Gurowake

Trivia bits

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20 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Keep in mind that many of today's younger stars have turned professional with anywhere between 5 and 15 years of amateur experience, often in high quality programs. A lot of them join already knowing what works for them, or at least thinking they know, to the consternation of their professional coaches.

Aoiyama is *still* listed as a yotsu wrestler on the Kyokai website, as that's presumably what he was as an amateur and what he started out as a pro.  His wikipedia page shows him on his debut tournament, and he was a *lot* skinnier.  Apparently as he put on weight he was no longer able to do yotsu very well and is now known as being almost exclusively an oshi specialist.  So clearly they can change based on circumstances.

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I'm guessing Takekaze's yorikiri percentage is extremely low as well for a rikishi with such a long career. I think the last time he used it to win a bout was in 2014. 

Edited by ryafuji

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2 hours ago, ryafuji said:

I'm guessing Takekaze's yorikiri percentage is extremely low as well for a rikishi with such a long career. I think the last time he used it to win a bout was in 2014. 

Not that hard to look up: http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_kim.aspx?r=1284 - around 4%.  He did have a yorikiri in Nagoya this year though.

Another interesting bit I noticed while looking at his yorikri list: his very first Ozumo match was against Ama (Harumafuji), and it was a win by yorikiri.  Ama had won the Sd Yusho the basho before and was in his first Makushita basho at Ms15 such as to be Takekaze's first opponent.  Takekaze went on to reach Juryo in 2 basho from debut, while it would take Ama a few more years.  Not too surprising given that Takekaze is 5 years older.

Edited by Gurowake
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Both makuuchi and juryo were won by rikishi who were one loss behind on the final day,  beat the rikishi who was in the lead to force a play-off and then won the play-off.

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17 hours ago, ryafuji said:

I'm guessing Takekaze's yorikiri percentage is extremely low as well for a rikishi with such a long career. I think the last time he used it to win a bout was in 2014. 

I've been looking at the percentages for all of the makuuchi for Aki; here's what I have so far:

image.png.0671350926416993e8002c93b628b16e.png

Takakaze is the second lowest; Takakeisho is the lowest by far (1 actual bout out of 131).

 

 

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1 hour ago, Yamanashi said:

I've been looking at the percentages for all of the makuuchi for Aki; here's what I have so far:

image.png.0671350926416993e8002c93b628b16e.png

Takakaze is the second lowest; Takakeisho is the lowest by far (1 actual bout out of 131).

 

 

Better to focus on the oshi-zumo specialist for a better comparison. Most of the others are yotsu-specialist or all rounders.

Onosho, Chiyomaru, Chiyotairyu, Kagayaki

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4 hours ago, rhyen said:

Better to focus on the oshi-zumo specialist for a better comparison. Most of the others are yotsu-specialist or all rounders.

Onosho, Chiyomaru, Chiyotairyu, Kagayaki

Done.  I've also calculated the oshidashi/yorikiri ratio.

image.png.2da8d924d8bc511fc80f41d55a725e95.png

Takakeisho still sticks out.

 

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NHK had an info graphic on senshuraku, listing the previous three yusho winners who had won despite trailing by 2 wins after Day 12. Here's a somewhat expanded version of that: all yusho winners who trailed by 2 at some point after Day 10, and how the yusho race developed from their point of view, listing how many rikishi (if any) were ahead of them after each day.

(red = trailed by 2 or 3, blue = trailed by 1, green = in the lead)
 

Basho Winner Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15
1954.03 12-3: Oe Mitsuneyama 7-3: 1x   9-1, 1x 8-2   8-3: 1x   9-2   9-3: led with 6 10-3: led with 2 11-3: led alone 12-3: outright yusho
1955.01 12-3: Y1e Chiyonoyama 7-3: 1x   9-1, 2x 8-2   8-3: 1x   9-2   9-3: led with 4 10-3: led with 2 11-3: led with 1 12-3: playoff yusho over 1
1956.05 12-3: O1e Wakanohana 7-3: 1x   9-1, 3x 8-2   8-3: 2x   9-2   9-3: 1x 10-2 10-3: led with 3 11-3: led with 1 12-3: playoff yusho over 1
1965.07 13-2: Y1w Taiho 9-1: 1x 10-0   9-2: 1x 11-0 10-2: 1x 11-1 11-2: 1x 12-1 12-2: led with 1 13-2: outright yusho
1965.09 12-3: Y2e Kashiwado 7-3: 2x   9-1, 1x 8-2   8-3: 1x 10-1, 1x   9-2   9-3: 2x 10-2 10-3: 2x 11-2 11-3: led with 3 12-3: playoff yusho over 2
1967.11 12-3: Y1w Sadanoyama 9-1: 1x 10-0   9-2: 1x 10-1   9-3: 1x 11-1 10-3: 1x 11-2 11-3: led with 2 12-3: outright yusho
1972.01 11-4: M5w Tochiazuma 7-3: 1x   8-2   7-4: 1x   9-2, 1x   8-3   8-4: 1x   9-3   9-4: led with 4 10-4: led with 2 11-4: outright yusho
1974.07 13-2: Y1e Wajima 9-1: 1x 10-0   9-2: 1x 11-0 10-2: 1x 11-1 11-2: 1x 12-1 12-2: 1x 13-1 13-2: playoff yusho over 1
1999.01 13-2: S1e Chiyotaikai 9-1: 1x 10-0 10-1: 1x 11-0 10-2: 1x 12-0 11-2: 1x 12-1 12-2: 1x 13-1 13-2: playoff yusho over 1
1999.11 12-3: Y1e Musashimaru 7-3: 1x   9-1, 3x 8-2   8-3: 1x 10-1, 1x   9-2   9-3: 1x 10-2 10-3: led with 2 11-3: led with 1 12-3: outright yusho
2005.09 13-2: Ye Asashoryu 9-1: 1x 10-0   9-2: 1x 11-0 10-2: 1x 12-0 11-2: 1x 12-1 12-2: led with 1 13-2: playoff yusho over 1
2012.05 12-3: M7w Kyokutenho 7-3: 1x   9-1, 3x 8-2   8-3: 1x 10-1   9-3: 1x 10-2 10-3: led with 2 11-3: led with 2 12-3: playoff yusho over 1
2015.05 12-3: Se Terunofuji 8-2: 2x   9-1   8-3: 2x 10-1, 2x   9-2   9-3: 2x 10-2 10-3: 1x 11-2 11-3: led with 1 12-3: outright yusho
2015.09 12-3: Y1w Kakuryu 8-2: 1x 10-0, 1x 9-1   9-2: 1x 11-0, 1x 10-1 10-2: 1x 11-1 11-2: led with 1 12-2: led alone 12-3: playoff yusho over 1
2017.09 11-4: Y1w Harumafuji 6-4: 1x   9-1, 1x 8-2, 6x 7-3   7-4: 1x 10-1, 3x   8-3   8-4: 1x 10-2   9-4: 1x 10-3 10-4: 1x 11-3 11-4: playoff yusho over 1


Sadanoyama's yusho, the first case of somebody coming back from 2 down with 3 to go, is a pretty boring story actually: Leader Taiho apparently got injured in his Day 12 win and missed the final three bouts of the basho, and two of the three pursuers were yokozuna (Sadanoyama and Kashiwado), so it's not a big surprise that one of them ended up catching him and claiming the title.

Harumafuji trailing by 3 wins after Day 10 makes him the only one who has managed to come back from that in the last 5 days. However, he's not the only one overall as one other winner was behind by 3 at an earlier date than Day 10, and thus was the very first one to claim a championship from that far down. Who was it? :-) (Harumafuji himself was 3 down after Day 5 as well, not only after Day 10.)

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On 9/30/2017 at 15:30, Asashosakari said:

Harumafuji trailing by 3 wins after Day 10 makes him the only one who has managed to come back from that in the last 5 days. However, he's not the only one overall as one other winner was behind by 3 at an earlier date than Day 10, and thus was the very first one to claim a championship from that far down. Who was it? :-) (Harumafuji himself was 3 down after Day 5 as well, not only after Day 10.)

Kyokutenho also started 2-3 on his Yusho run.  Kotoshogiku was 5-0 to start that basho.

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1 hour ago, Gurowake said:

Kyokutenho also started 2-3 on his Yusho run.  Kotoshogiku was 5-0 to start that basho.

That basho also featured an Ozeki who was 2 wins in the lead at 10-1 after Day 11 and only won again on Day 14 to finish 11-4.

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Yokozuna Musashimaru is the only rikishi in the 15 day basho era to have won the yusho with a 15-0, 14-1, 13-2, 12-3 and 11-4. Harumafuji has the yusho with all of those records EXCEPT a 12-3. 

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The oldest Makuuchi next basho will be Aminishiki (born 10/3/1978).  The oyakata of Naruto-beya will be ex-Kotooshu (born 2/19/1983).  How often is a top-ranker older than the youngest stable master?  Is this the largest age difference?  Has a rikishi in Maegashira or above ever been older than his own  oyakata?

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On 4.10.2017 at 07:59, Yamanashi said:

  Has a rikishi in Maegashira or above ever been older than his own  oyakata?

Takamisakari and his shisho Azumazeki (ex-Ushiomaru) who is two years younger

Edited by Senkoho
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In 2008, Aminishiki achieved something that 5 current or future yokozuna and 8 other current or future san'yaku couldn't.  What was it?

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14 minutes ago, Yamanashi said:

In 2008, Aminishiki achieved something that 5 current or future yokozuna and 8 other current or future san'yaku couldn't.  What was it?

Run a funny blog?

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1 hour ago, Yamanashi said:

In 2008, Aminishiki achieved something that 5 current or future yokozuna and 8 other current or future san'yaku couldn't.  What was it?

He needed only 4 consecutive tournaments to defeat all the Y/Os at least once while being maegashira?

Edited by Benihana

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24 minutes ago, Benihana said:

He needed only 4 consecutive tournaments to defeat all the Y/Os at least once while being maegashira?

Not what I was looking for, but way cool!

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1 hour ago, Yamanashi said:

Not what I was looking for, but way cool!

I don't know if that's correct, just a guess.

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He did get six losses on the eighth day, but what I was going for was this:

In Natsu basho 2008, he was the only rikishi to defeat Kotooshu:

Not Asashoryu (Y1e)

Not Hakuho (Y1w)

Not Kakuryu (M3w)

Not Ama (S1e)

Not Kisenosato (K1e)

... and not Kaio, Baruto, etc.

In fact, for 2008 he beat Hakuho twice and Kakuryu three times -- and he owned Osh (5-1).

 

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Whut?

 

That's not a quiz, that's a scandal!

 

Reminds me a bit of:

What have the icons on the top of the reply box in common?

a) They are all stupid.

b) They are all not stupid at all.

c) They are all on top of the reply box.

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Entering Kyushu basho Toyonoshima is in his 7th consecutive basho since he got demoted from juryo, moving him into a tie for second place all-time among unsalaried ex-sekiwake. The runaway leader is Tochiakagi who was on the banzuke for 27 more basho after losing his sekitori status. Tied with Toyonoshima at #2 is Dewagatake from the 1930s, albeit a time when there were only two annual basho, so he was down there for a lot longer with his 7 tournaments. In 4th place we have Hoo with 6 basho. And that's the lot for former sekiwake who decided to stick it out, none of the others who were demoted hung around for more than 3 tournaments before retiring or getting back to juryo.

Edited by Asashosakari
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27 minutes ago, Asashosakari said:

Entering Kyushu basho Toyonoshima is in his 7th consecutive basho since he got demoted from juryo, moving him into a tie for second place all-time among unsalaried ex-sekiwake. The runaway leader is Tochiakagi who was on the banzuke for 27 more basho after losing his sekitori status. Tied with Toyonoshima at #2 is Dewagatake from the 1930s, albeit a time when there were only two annual basho, so he was down there for a lot longer with his 7 tournaments. In 4th place we have Hoo with 6 basho. And that's the lot for former sekiwake who decided to stick it out, none of the others who were demoted hung around for more than 3 tournaments before retiring or getting back to juryo.

Tochiakagi might be ahead of Toyonoshima here, but they are not really in the same class. Toyonoshima had 5 jun-yusho and appeared in a yusho kettei-sen, he probably is already the leader in such a category.

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