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  1. 15 points
  2. 15 points
  3. 13 points
    Ozeki Takakeisho fought against sekitori opposition for the first time since his pectoral injury happened (just 40 days ago...). He had 10 bouts against Takanosho, Kagayaki and Onosho and won 8. "I didn't really know what to expect at first but my body moved well. I don't feel any pain" he commented. "He didn't seem to feel too much disconfort" analyzed his oyakata after the practice. Oguruma Oyakata had also his take on Takakeisho "There's still some way to go, he was fighting against lower maegashira opposition. There's only a few days left already so it's the preparation he'll do from now that'll matter" And Shibatayama Oyakata had something to say too " His sumo doesn't seem affected by the injury, he is doing similar sumo as last basho so I'm not worried" https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201911010000633.html
  4. 12 points
    http://www.sumo.or.jp/EnHonbashoBanzuke/index/index.php/ Makuuchi Kakuryu Y Hakuho Goeido O Takayasu Takakeisho O --- Mitakeumi S Tochinoshin Abi K Endo Hokutofuji K Asanoyama Daieisho M1 Okinoumi Myogiryu M2 Meisei Takarafuji M3 Tomokaze Tamawashi M4 Kotoyuki Aoiyama M5 Ryuden Onosho M6 Enho Tsurugisho M7 Kotoeko Shohozan M8 Sadanoumi Kotoshogiku M9 Yutakayama Shimanoumi M10 Shodai Ishiura M11 Chiyotairyu Ichinojo M12 Takanosho Chiyomaru M13 Kagayaki Terutsuyoshi M14 Nishikigi Daishomaru M15 Daishoho Wakatakakage M16 ---
  5. 11 points
  6. 11 points
    I always have a hard time finding Juryo recaps so I'm going to make some myself this basho. I should be able to record the bouts most days, but I don't think I'll be able to get every day, especially during the second week. Does anyone on here already record all the Juryo bouts? Or would anyone be interested in recording on days I won't be around? Thanks for the help!
  7. 10 points
    Fukurou seems to not have been on the forum in a month (hopefully everything is alright and she's just busy), so here goes...the non-starting rikishi for Kyushu basho: Makuuchi M12e Ichinojo (Minato, kyujo Day 5 in Aki) Juryo none Makushita Ms5w Takanofuji (Chiganoura, ?!? - no idea why they haven't marked him retired yet) Ms8e Arawashi (Minezaki, kyujo Day 13 in Aki) Ms18w Nishikifuji (Isegahama, kyujo Day 9 in Aki) Sandanme Sd25w Kirinoryu (Michinoku, kyujo since Aki) Sd47e Komanokuni (Shibatayama) Sd60w Chiyodaigo (Kokonoe, kyujo Day 3 in Aki) Jonidan Jd14w Kyokuyuko (Nakagawa, kyujo since Aki) Jd18w Chiyotaiho (Kokonoe) Jd31e Kakutaiki (Michinoku) Jd52e Kototaiki (Sadogatake, kyujo since Aki) Jd61e Chiyotensho (Kokonoe) Jd72e Raiga (Futagoyama) Jd76e Honma (Naruto) Jd76w Hamasu (Onoe, kyujo Day 13 in Aki) Jd92w Fukunofuji (Isegahama, kyujo since Natsu) Jd100w Hanashi (Musashigawa) Jd102w Ariake (Isenoumi, kyujo since Nagoya) Jd107e Toki (Tatsunami) Jonokuchi Jk10w Toyama (Musashigawa) Jk26e Goketsuyama (Shibatayama, kyujo since Aki) Jk26w Wakaseido (Asahiyama, kyujo since Nagoya) Jk27e Yamamotozakura (Shikihide) Jk27w Kototsukahara (Sadogatake, kyujo since Aki) Jk28e Reon (Shikihide, kyujo since Nagoya)
  8. 10 points
    I don't see the topic yet so I'm starting it with this piece on Ozeki Takayasu who was back in training this morning after announcing his engagement yesterday. Takayasu took part to the Nishonoseki training session ( rikishi from other ichimon were also there, namely : Goeido, Tomokaze, Onosho) and had the most bout of all sekitori present, 25 in total. "It was a good session. I could move my body well and I did forward sumo" he analyzed A lot of fans who were there to watch the training congratulated him on his recent engagement to the Enka singer Mori Konomi (they look beautiful together btw so if you didn't see the pictures of videos go watch them). "I received a lot of support, I want to turn it into strength and up my motivation ahead of the basho" commented Takayasu. While the fans and the media are rooting for him to finally start a Yokozuna run, not all voices are this positive. Oguruma Oyakata who watched over the session is a bit worried about Takayasu injured arm. The injured arm was tapped and although Takayasu fought 25 bouts the results were not great: 1-9 against Goeido, 4-2 against Tomokaze, and 3-6 against Onosho ( so 8-17 in total) and in between the bouts Takayasu looked worried about his arm a few times. "Takayasu is still in pain" commented Oguruma, "I'm worried about Takayasu, he is way too preoccupied by his his arm" added Shibatayama Oyakata. Even Takayasu himself admits his elbow isn't perfectly healed yet, "I can put some strength in my left arm but my power is down compared to before the injury. There's still some time, I'll do my best to improve my condition" The Basho starts in 9 days, Takayasu is Kadoban. https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201911010000376.html
  9. 10 points
    Hokutofuji and Asanoyama made it! The fairest decision. Glad they could finally bring themselves to have more than two komusubi.
  10. 9 points
    Terunofuji declared he wants to be back in makuuchi before the Olympics.Today he went with the heya's sekitori for degeiko to Tokitsukaze-beya. The now ms10 did 6 bouts in a row with Yutakayama, Shodai, Nishikigi and juryo Azumaryu and won them all, a break and then 4 more wins in a row. He needs a 7-0 (makushita yusho) to get back to juryo for next basho. https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201911060000424.html o
  11. 9 points
    Kintamayama bribes them to delay the announcement to allow for time to play Guess the Banzuke.
  12. 9 points
    Nine shikona changes on this banzuke for rikishi from eight different heya. Kototebakari's change to Kotoshoho was announced along with his promotion, and is the only one among the top three divisions. He has also changed the given name to Yoshinari. It was only recently that Obana was lamenting the lack of flowers on the banzuke, but now he can cheer for a new one as Koshinishiki changes to Etsunohana. The first kanji is the same as before but with a different reading, that of his hometown Joetsu. He too has changed his given name to Tomoya, which in his case is his real given name. In Sakaigawa-beya, Obamaumi takes on a more heya-specific shikona, Sadanoryu. Over in Futagoyama-beya, Morita is the latest to receive a kanji from the shisho (former Ozeki Miyabiyama), in this case it's about as simple as can be as he is now Miyabi. Three other rikishi also receive their first shikona; Kise-beya's Shioya is now Kisenoumi, the first two kanji obviously those of the heya. Similar story for Fujishima-beya's Ueta, who gets a kanji from the heya and is now Fujinonami. Meanwhile, Tatsunami-beya's Minami is now Zuiko - I'll see if I can find out the context behind that one, as it seems quite unusual. Few rikishi deserve a change of luck more than oft-injured Mitsuuchi; perhaps his new shikona Tosamidori will provide it. The first two kanji are likely in honour of his home prefecture Kochi, formerly known as Tosa province. He's also changed the given name to Kiyota. Finally, banzuke returnee Okuniasahi has made the same change as his brother Okunisato did earlier in the year, switching the middle kanji but with no change to the reading. J13e Kototebakari Toshiki > Kotoshoho Yoshinari (琴勝峰 吉成) Sd64w Koshinishiki Masatora > Etsunohana Tomoya (越乃花 友弥) Jd22w Obamaumi > Sadanoryu (佐田の龍) Jd82w Morita > Miyabi (雅) Jd83e Shioya > Kisenoumi (木瀬ノ海) Jd95e Ueta > Fujinonami (藤乃波) Jd104e Minami > Zuiko (瑞光) Jk15w Mitsuuchi Kota > Tosamidori Kiyota (土佐緑 清太) Jk29e Okuniasahi (大国旭 > 大國旭)
  13. 8 points
    There can't be many rikishi who can say they fought father-and-son sekitori; Chiyonofuji did it against Takanohana/Takahanada, and today Toyonoshima met a Kotonowaka again. Unlikely, since it was Fujinoteru who did it. I'll upload the clip I've got when I do the kimarite statistics after the basho.
  14. 8 points
    Asanoyama looked completely flawless in his victory over Kakuryu. Simply steamrolled the top yokozuna as if he wasn't even there. Asanoyama yusho for sure.
  15. 8 points
    Sadogatake guys tuning up for Kyushu.
  16. 8 points
    Ura will be back for Kyushu, restarting from jd106, after 5 basho: "I only prepared" - during the long rehabilitation he trained his muscles - upper and lower body. He resumed keiko end of October in Fukuoka, and also this day he did 20 bouts. Already 2 times he had surgery - there mustn't be a 3rd time, thus his focus is to do sumo "So there's no injury" https://www.daily.co.jp/general/2019/11/06/0012852196.shtml
  17. 8 points
    M12e Ichinojo is heading for juryo - his back pain has become more severe and kyujo for Kyushu is imminent. He had continued rehabilitation in Tokyo so far, but still is in no condition to train. He'll arrive in Fukuoka on the 4th and continue with rehabilitation there. The weight of 224kg was the main cause of the problem - he's down to 190kg now. Severe back pain started 3 years ago, and this time he wants to devote himself to recuperation, though entering later is still under consideration. Minato-oyakata:"We'll look at his condition and decide. I don't want him to act unreasonable. A powerful rikishi will certainly make it back to makuuchi, once properly cured." https://www.sanspo.com/sports/news/20191104/sum19110405010001-n1.html
  18. 8 points
  19. 8 points
    I again regret not to have given this an extra thread - Takayasu and Konomi Mori today o o ooo oo o ooo o o o o oo o o oo o o o oo o o o oo oo and Natsu 2017 o NHK charity ozumo this year o news clip vid congratulations o
  20. 8 points
    Sekiwake Tochinoshin was looking good at training today, facing visiting Mitakeumi and others going 9-6 and even tsuridashi'd Mitakeumi. It was a warm sunny day today, which is good news for his battered body. "This kind of day is good. My body is moving well. I just hope my knee gambarizes during the basho," he said. He is facing a second return to Ozeki, the first since ex-Tochiazuma. "I'm feeling OK. The pressure on me to win is stronger when I'm Ozeki. I feel I will be able to go all out this time!!" he proclaimed. https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/img/201910310000420-w500_0.jpg
  21. 8 points
    That is a lot of questions, but since I never get to talk about sumo in my real life, I'll gladly answer at length here! I currently live in the United States east coast, although I come from Turkey, which is something of a wrestling country (I am an oil wrestling fan besides sumo). My road to sumo was rather strange - I happened to see some people discussing a basho on another website once, and I didn't understand any of the esoteric terminology at the time; a few years later, after slowly becoming curious about the subject, I searched sumo in Youtube and found Kintamayama's channel during Aki 2018...the rest is history. As for Ichinojo, I have a few reasons as to why I like him. One of the first things I did when I found sumoforum was search for informational videos, and I was rewarded with a whole thread of them. One of the posts in this thread featured a documentary about Ichinojo from his early days, back when there were great things expected of him. He seemed (as I'm sure all rikishi do in documentaries about themselves) to be very humble and just generally nice, despite his big success. However, this impression really hit me when I watched an early match of his - I think versus Kisenosato - which featured numerous false starts; each time, to my pleasant surprise, Ichinojo gave a very deep bow, which struck me considering how most rikishi just give a little nod. Add to all this the fact that he was (at the time) so spry and strong at 180 kg and I instantly became a fan. Plus, he was originally a nomad! How cool is that. This kind of brings me to what interests me and saddens me about sumo - the fact that there are so many people who come up the ranks with great hopes and expectations upon them and end up being mid-maegashira, or worse yet, they get injured and their career takes a dive. I know that among the current Makuuchi rikishi, there are several besides my big man who fall into this category of "next ozeki/yokozuna turned disappointment," and while I'm sure this is just the nature of the game, I can't help but see it as a tragedy. Why must this happen? And even more than that, what do the rikishi themselves feel? Behind the stoic manly face presented to the public, what is their human heart like? Are they sad, or disappointed, or just resigned? Does Ichinojo wonder about what might have been if he could have maintained his form and weight and curse whatever events led to him ballooning in size? Does he still have hope that he might achieve the goals that once seemed inevitable? What does that lovely family of his shown in the documentary think nowadays? This sort of thing, the search for inherent humanity, is not what initially attracted me to sumo - but it is why I remained, even though I have no way of knowing any of this short of becoming a wrestler myself. And so I am stuck here, wondering, as I watch from a detached distance the flesh-and-blood men who are mandated to be like stone in all things. They come close, I think, but surely something of the host must survive, right? This is why this website is so valuable - through it, I might be able to get close to the answers for these questions. Or maybe not, but who knows? I have some hope. As for my shikona, if you can call it that, it's an acronym of personal meaning for myself. I don't know any Japanese, so I couldn't pick a real one. That ended up being a long, rambling response. If anyone read this whole thing, thanks! As I said, it's rare that I get to talk about sumo, so I took this chance and flew away with it.
  22. 7 points
    Hi there, one of my favorite silly pet projects is to visualize how sumo gamers fare in Kyushu Basho, originally with the intent to show how fickle and hard-contested the fight for the Sumo Gaming World Championship can be. Of course, this all has changed with Pandaazuma. In recent years, he played in a league of his own, but this is no longer the case, as in 2019 he is playing in an entirely different dimension, thus making the question of who will become Sumo Game World Champion moot. In fact, I have already ordered trophies for Pandaazuma for the years 2019 through 2025 (which, of course, is a lie; but I have a feeling that I could order them right here and right now). In any case, this will not detract me from visualizing how the other best sumo gamers in the world fared, and to put this into a visualization that will be updated each day. Unfortunately, any visualization that pictures Pandaazuma will make comparisons of the scores of other players an exercise in having great eyesight, as their internal differences must be captured within a few pixels. In order to be able to discern the trajectories of the mere mortals among players, the visualization below will represent Pandaazuma's score minus 100 points! Of course, even then he would lead by a mile. It's beyond laughable, but what can you do... Anyway, here are the standings for Day 1 (Day 2 will come in much later today, if not tomorrow). For each day, I will compute the standings in the various games and add them to the overall Sumo Gaming World Championship tally (which can be seen here). On each day of the basho (hopefully), I will provide you with the estimated Top 10 Sekitori Oracle standings (as the standings on the Web page are relatively uninformative until the last few days of the basho), the Top 10 positions for the Kyushu Masters, and a visualization of the top players in total. So here we go with Day 1: Oracle Estimated Final Standings: 1. Sakura 644 2. Ryoshishokunin 639 2. Frinkanohana 639 2. Gansekiiwa 639 5. Kishikaisei 636 5. pandaazuma 636 7. Gurowake 635 8. Haidouzo 634 8. Tsuchinoninjin 634 8. Mmikasazuma 634 Standings for the Kyushu Masters: 1. Athenayama 60.98 (lead in OBG, co-lead in RotoSumo, 2nd in Hoshitori Game) 2. ScreechingOwl 49.63 (2nd in Salarycap Sumo) 3. Taka 39.56 (co-lead in RotoSumo) 4. Tsuchinoninjin 37.05 (lead in Odd Sumo and Salarycap Sumo) 5. Pandaazuma 34.80 (co-lead in Juryo Game) 6. Gansekiiwa 33.98 (2nd in Odd Sumo, tied for 2nd in Oracle) 7. Norizo 32.32 (lead in Hoshitori Game) 8. Hironoumi 28.58 (3rd in Hoshitori Game and RotoSumo) 9. Takanorappa 28.56 (lead in Toto) 10. Frinkanohana 28.28 (co-lead in TTT, tied for 2nd in Oracle) And here is da graph: The question of who becomes first or second seems settled. Norizo jumped into 3rd place, overtaking Gonzaburow. chishafuwaku defended 5th place for now, but Taka is off to a brilliant start, moving from 12th to 6th overall. 7th to 10th are covered by ScreechingOwl (who was even outside of the 100 points club featured here, but catapulted himself into the standings), Ganzohnesushi (OK'ish start), Andoreasu (meh start, dropping from 7th), and Golynohana (also lackluster, dropping from 8th place).
  23. 7 points
    When the city of Tsushima carried out a survey of its cultural treasures, it discovered that Nagasaki Prefectural Tsushima High School still had a kesho-mawashi of Taisho-era Ozeki Tsushimanada. An employee who had worked there for over 40 years recalled that when the current school building was opened in 1978, the old one was converted into warehouse space, and the kesho-mawashi was likely packed away somewhere and forgotten about while everyone was busy with the move. Born in a village called Kuwa, upon reaching adulthood Tsushimanada joined the Japanese army, serving in Tsushima's heavy artillery battalion. Due to his great height a senior officer recommended he be discharged in favour of taking up sumo, and so he entered Dewanoumi-beya at 21, although his hatsu dohyo was delayed until 1910 as he was struggling with a thiamine deficiency. To mark his Ozeki promotion he received the kesho-mawashi from the Tsushima(no)kuni koenkai, but unfortunately his time at the rank was cut short due to a left arm injury. He completed only one of the next five basho and retired from ozumo at 34, returning to Tsushima where he died in 1933 at the age of 45. Tsushimanada is shown wearing the kesho-mawashi on this commemorative postcard, issued at the time of his Ozeki promotion. The postcard is in the collection of Tsushimanada's great niece Chiyoko Kawakami, along with another of his kesho-mawashi and a haori with his family crest. That kesho-mawashi was given by Morinaga Confectionery and features the company's angel logo. His modern-day namesake, Sakaigawa-beya's Tsushimanada, is not related but was given the shikona as his father and grandfather both hail from Tsushima, which I didn't know before.
  24. 7 points
    Even during his active days, Kitazakura (now Shikihide) was known for his side activities dealing with problem adolescents. It looks like he may be using his heya more as a refuge for these kids than as a training grounds for future sekitori.
  25. 7 points
    Hello, I'm a fairly young person (compared to some of you all) who has only been watching sumo since Aki 2018, almost totally by accident. I immediately got hooked and in my search for information between bashos, I found my way here, where I have been lurking for a few months. Thanks to all of you people for posting and providing news and commentary - it blows my mind to see how much information is on here, without which I couldn't have become properly addicted! I don't plan on posting very much, but I wanted to have the ability to if there was need (like the Ichinojo yusho which I hope for every tournament but to no avail). Until then, this'll be about it. Thanks again!