Yubinhaad

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Yubinhaad last won the day on June 15

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  1. Ozumo beyond 2020 basho for foreign visitors

    A few more pictures of the 2017 performance of sandangamae.
  2. Rikishi extra activities

    A small group from Takasago-beya visited a rest home in Kamakura, Kanagawa prefecture yesterday, led by heya manager Matsuda (former Ichinoya). Rikishi Asakoki and Asanojo performed in sumo demonstrations (exercises, kimarite and hansoku), while yobidashi Rikinojo gave taiko and jinku performances. Heya chanko was enjoyed by all.
  3. Former Juryo Wakanoshima intai

    A few more pictures from Wakanoshima's danpatsu-shiki.
  4. Latest kabu-babu changes

    Just to have it updated here, Takekuma (former Maegashira Zaonishiki) celebrated his 65th birthday on September 3rd and is now into his extra five years as a consultant. His (then impending) retirement was marked at Tokitsukaze-beya's senshuraku party after the Nagoya basho. Oyama-oyakata (former Maegashira Daihi) turns 65 on October 16th, according to Azumazeki's okamisan he will also be staying on for the extra five years. He also received flowers at the heya's senshuraku party after the Aki basho. .
  5. Games talk Aki Basho 2017

    Well, the lowest-scoring Makuuchi yusho race in 21 years resulted in the lowest-scoring Hoshitori yusho in 15 years - not a bad way to mark my 100th basho! I think it's only the third sub-1000-point yusho during my time playing it. With a UDH win in Nagoya and now this, I should probably buy some lottery tickets before my luck runs out.
  6. The latest set of upcoming promotions among the gyoji, yobidashi and tokoyama have been announced. All are effective from December 26th, the banzuke release day for the 2018 Hatsu basho. Gyoji: Kimura Masatoshi (Chiganoura-beya) - to Sandanme Shikimori Seiichiro (Isegahama) - to Jonidan Kimura Sakuranosuke (Shikihide) - to Jonidan Yobidashi: Fujio (Isegahama) - to Juryo Kohei (Nakagawa) - to Makushita Tokoyama: Tokosei (Asakayama) - to Itto (1st class) Tokogo (Oguruma) - to Itto Tokoteru (Sakaigawa) - to Yonto (4th class) Tokoyu (Onomatsu) - to Yonto Tokoazuma (Sadogatake) - to Yonto Recent threads: 2014/2015 promotions 2015/2016 promotions 2017 promotions Apparently I'm incapable of settling on one particular thread title for this stuff. I was thinking perhaps it should all be consolidated into a single thread for easier reference, thoughts?
  7. Retirees after Aki 2017

    Quite a few veterans calling it a day this time. Also quite a lot of danpatsu-shiki pictures around, so it might take a minute for everything to load. Minatosho retires after a 17-year career, in fact he made his debut in the same basho as Wakanoshima. Minatosho was one of a handful of remaining rikishi who had experienced the kosho system, I believe there are only four others left now. Okuma retires after 14 years and moves on to work (or perhaps train first) as a seitai therapist. Fujinohana retires just a few months after his twin brother Fujinoumi, and will apparently be following him to the USA where their father lives. Gagyusan retires after 11 years, and will do some sort of work for the local authority in his hometown of Kamibayashi. He certainly has one of the more unique database pictures! Kisenowaka's 11-year career began with a Jonokuchi kettei-sen appearance in his first basho alongside the much-hyped Masumeidai. In the end they were both beaten by Tongan Hisanoumi, who was returning from a year-long injury absence. 35-year-old Suzaku - one of the rare Tonodai graduates who didn't join Tokitsukaze-beya - retires after a dozen years on the dohyo, most of which time was spent in the Makushita ranks. His kyujo this basho ended his streak of 518 consecutive bouts from his debut. And finally, also retiring but not on the list this time is Izutsu-beya's Mutsumi, who apparently had his danpatsu-shiki with just his family.
  8. 2017 Aki - Kimarite Statistics

    Greetings all, at the end of this remarkable basho. While injuries reduced the top end of the banzuke to a skeleton crew, the Makuuchi yusho was still taken by a high-ranking rikishi, with lone Yokozuna Harumafuji staging a superb recovery to snatch the yusho from the hands of lone Ozeki Goeido. Moving on to the techniques, Matsuda put his leg trip skills on display to great effect here, winning bouts with nimaigeri, uchigake and nichonage on the way to a 7-0 record. While he wasn't able to solve the Enho puzzle in the Sandanme yusho kettei-sen, it's still the best result of his career and will see him make his Makushita debut in the final basho of the year. The middle Sunday of the basho saw no less than three tsuridashi performed, the first of them by 42-year-old Isenohana which was a fine way to mark the 1,000th bout of his long career. It's always nice to see the rare zori-te techniques make an appearance, and three of them were used in this basho! Ikeru clearly had a plan for his bout against Masutoo, going low right at the start for a tsutaezori win against the Hungarian. It's the first appearance of the year for that one. Next, Fukuyama showed impressive strength and agility to keep his backside off the dohyo to get an izori win against Onojo. Finally, Saionji added new depth to his usual oshi-based sumo with a tasukizori on Senshuraku, toppling Hokutotsuru. Aside from tsutaezori, two other kimarite also made their first appearance of 2017 in this basho. On Day 10, Konno flattened his smaller opponent Ono for a sabaori win. The following day Matsuzawa (son of former Sekiwake Kotonishiki) had a couple of tries at lifting Toki out of the dohyo for an okuritsuridashi win. Thanks to Asashosakari for those videos! Wakasatake swept up two of the basho's four susoharai wins in his 4-0 start, although he faded after that. He has more wins with susoharai than any other kimarite, albeit only three basho into his career. There were a couple of attempted kekaeshi leg kicks which didn't succeed, most spectacularly from retiring Mutsumi, whose air shot quickly led to the end of his bout against Toseima. A few days later, Matsuzawa at least made contact with his attempt against Chida, albeit also in vain. Shoutout to the tenacious Awajiumi for a couple of gyakuten dashinage wins in this basho. For the eighth time, oshidashi was the most common kimarite in the basho, accounting for 26.56% of all torikumi. The three highest oshidashi percentages have all occurred in the last three Aki basho, with last year's 26.71% the highest. Wacky! Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 1 0 0 2 4 0 7 0.29% Amiuchi 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04% Ashitori 1 1 1 1 0 1 5 0.21% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 3 1 2 0 3 2 11 0.46% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Hatakikomi 32 17 36 38 52 3 178 7.42% Hikiotoshi 16 6 12 22 27 6 89 3.71% Hikkake 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 0.13% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Isamiashi 0 1 0 2 0 2 5 0.21% Izori 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Kainahineri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Kakenage 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 3 1 4 8 4 0 20 0.83% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 0 0 2 4 1 0 7 0.29% Kimetaoshi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Kirikaeshi 1 0 1 0 0 2 4 0.17% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotenage 6 2 13 6 10 0 37 1.54% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Makiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Okuridashi 5 5 15 23 25 3 76 3.17% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Okuritaoshi 0 2 3 3 4 1 13 0.54% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 59 46 107 198 183 44 637 26.56% Oshitaoshi 5 5 15 17 40 12 94 3.92% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 0 0 0 4 2 0 6 0.25% Shitatehineri 1 0 0 2 3 1 7 0.29% Shitatenage 5 4 7 7 20 4 47 1.96% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Sotogake 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 0.17% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 6 8 7 14 11 3 49 2.04% Susoharai 0 1 0 0 3 0 4 0.17% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Tokkurinage 0 2 0 0 1 0 3 0.13% Tottari 2 0 2 2 1 0 7 0.29% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 8 5 5 17 4 1 40 1.67% Tsukihiza 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Tsukiotoshi 29 12 27 46 41 4 159 6.63% Tsukitaoshi 1 1 1 1 0 0 4 0.17% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 0 1 2 0 1 1 5 0.21% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04% Tsutaezori 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Uchigake 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Uchimuso 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 2 2 3 1 8 0.33% Uwatedashinage 3 7 6 4 8 0 28 1.17% Uwatehineri 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Uwatenage 12 11 11 20 42 7 103 4.30% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 1 0 2 0 1 1 5 0.21% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 66 62 100 154 182 33 597 24.90% Yoritaoshi 4 9 15 26 42 11 107 4.46% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% This is the 100th basho to take place since the kimarite list was last altered in 2001, and since then there have been 250,772 honwari torikumi. As mentioned earlier, three of the exotic zori-te group were used in this very basho. Unsurprisingly, the other three members of the group - kakezori, shumokuzori and sototasukizori - are the only kimarite to remain unused during the current era. Of course, yorikiri is by far the most common kimarite across the era as a whole, accounting for 26.22% of all those bouts. But during the last six years oshidashi has closed the gap quite noticeably. It's been far too many years since I made any kind of chart, so please forgive the amateur rush job here.
  9. Persistence Watch - 2017 edition

    It's correct, sometimes a rikishi will get an extra eighth bout to make up the numbers in the last two days. This basho it was Sekizukayama on Day 14.
  10. Trivia bits

    Kenshin has 0% interest in a mawashi grip.
  11. Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Aki 2017

    While Matsuda's family name is the expected characters 松田, his shikona is actually taken from Matsuda Shokudo, 満津田食堂, a restaurant owned by his parents in the family hometown of Iida, Nagano prefecture. It has been in business for 130 years after being founded in 1887. Last year he and some of his stablemates made the 40-minute journey to Iida from Gifu, where the summer jungyo began, to visit the restaurant. Katsudon, pork served over a bowl of rice, appears to be a speciality. (A few pictures in the box at the bottom) Matsuda has a lot of judo experience and is particularly good at leg techniques, among them sasae tsurikomi ashi which is nimaigeri on the sumo dohyo. He has five wins with that in his career so far, including his first win this basho. He hadn't expected to have such a good basho, but after getting his seventh win yesterday he found himself surrounded by reporters in the hanamichi. "I always thought of this as other people's business, nothing to do with me," he said with a smile. He will fight for the Sandanme yusho in a kettei-sen tomorrow against Enho. Nobody else has managed to defeat Enho yet, but Matsuda is very skillful and shouldn't be written off.
  12. Former Juryo Wakanoshima announced his retirement after a 17-year career. He made his debut in March 2000 as a member of Hanaregoma-beya, and fell one win short of promotion to Juryo a dozen years later. After the heya closed in 2013 the surviving rikishi moved to Shibatayama-beya, and Wakanoshima finally made his Juryo debut in the 2014 Nagoya basho. He chalked up seven basho in the division in total, but lately he has been struggling with a right knee injury and felt it was increasingly unlikely that he would return to the sekitori ranks again. Wakanoshima signed off today with a win in his final bout. His danpatsu-shiki is set to take place at the Kokugikan on the 30th, after which he will apparently work in a Tokyo restaurant. Pictured outside the Kokugikan on Day 12. Edit: And presented with flowers following his final bout today.
  13. Winter jungyo 2017

    The full schedule for the final jungyo of 2017 has been released. Eight events take place around Japan's southern island of Kyushu, before the sumo year comes to an end with a trip to Okinawa for a couple of two-day events. By my count, that makes 78 jungyo days in total this year. December 3rd - Omura, Nagasaki December 4th - Goto, Nagasaki December 6th - Nogata, Fukuoka December 7th - Usa, Oita December 8th - Miyazaki, Miyazaki December 9th - Kumamoto, Kumamoto December 10th - Kagoshima, Kagoshima December 11th - Kitakyushu, Fukuoka December 13th/14th - Miyakojima, Okinawa December 16th/17th - Ginowan, Okinawa
  14. Basho Talk - Aki 2017 (SPOILERS)

    I was hoping a video would turn up, thanks! While slipping plays a part, Konno has his hands on Ono's mawashi and is clearly bearing down on him, so I definitely agree with the sabaori call. First of the year, too.
  15. Rikishi Status Aki 2017 - Day 15 no changes

    Former Juryo Higonojo has a fractured bone in his hand. Further down the ranks his stablemate Fukuda pulled a calf muscle in his right leg in keiko just before the basho, leading to his Shonichi fusenpai. And while linking videos I've seen a couple of other injuries. Veteran Dairaido seemed to pull a hamstring after an awkward splits at the end of his last bout, unfortunately. Tsuyasato's right knee buckled when Ezuka tried a susoharai footsweep in their their bout back on Day 2.