Yubinhaad

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Yubinhaad last won the day on March 30

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  1. Joining Oguruma-beya is 22-year-old Yuta Minami, who graduated in March from Nippon Sports Science University, same as his senior stablemate Yoshikaze. The press report him as 180cm, 165kg currently. Third from right with the sky blue tie. Also, the two new gyoji made their first appearance during the Haru jungyo, here they are courtesy of the Kyokai.
  2. In Kashiwa yesterday it was performed by Sadogatake-beya's Kotootori, from the same ichimon, seen here rehearsing:
  3. Not sure if we have a specific thread about citizenship, but it is also potentially relevant here. Asasekiryu has been granted Japanese citizenship and is therefore eligible to hold a myoseki, paving the way for him to stay in the Kyokai after intai. It was formally announced in the Official Gazette today, seen at the bottom of this screenshot:
  4. I'm pretty sure the images used on jungyo posters are stock images provided by the Kyokai, and I don't think there's any reversing or other manipulation involved. Certainly the Kisenosato picture is, it was on the cover of the Haru basho pamphlet. Harumafuji is in the same kesho-mawashi and holding his tachi the same way in his Kyokai profile picture, so this jungyo one is probably another from that shoot. Hakuho has the same kesho-mawashi but is holding the tachi in his left hand on his profile, so there's evidently no formal rules about which hand or how that is held. The organising team likely communicate with the Kyokai during the planning and choose which pictures they want from the Kyokai library depending on how the poster is to be laid out.
  5. Two new gyoji and one new tokoyama join the ranks for the Natsu basho, all 15 years old. Kimura Narimasa (木村 成将), Irumagawa-beya Shikimori Tomotaro (式守 友太郎), Tomozuna-beya Tokohibiki (床響), Sadogatake-beya Rumours that Tokohibiki falls over just as he's about to complete a chonmage are unfounded...
  6. A dozen sekitori on the kyujo list for the start of the jungyo, most of them from the top flight. Hopefully the two Yokozuna will be able to join later even if only for dohyo-iri duty. Makuuchi: Hakuho, Kisenosato, Goeido, Terunofuji, Takekaze, Arawashi, Kaisei, Tochinoshin, Kyokushuho, Chiyoo. Juryo: Chiyootori, Fujiazuma.
  7. These new recruits are getting younger all the time...
  8. Here are the kimarite statistics for all divisions in this remarkable basho. Midorifuji had quite an eventful basho. On Day 9 he produced one of the rarest kimarite, spinning Shingaku around and toppling him with an okurigake rear leg trip. It is only the second time that this kimarite has been used since it was introduced in the 2001 expansion. More notably, Midorifuji had a large slice of luck on Senshuraku when the shimpan wrongly called a mawashi hansoku against his oppponent Nishiyama, as reported here by Kintamayama. It was the only hansoku of the basho. Once again we have the Uno brothers to thank for all four of the ashitori in this basho. For the second Haru basho in a row, Amanishiki had a chance of pulling off an all-ashitori kachi-koshi, but alas this time he lost his final bout (last year he won the bout, but not with an ashitori). Matsuda and Akua both have plenty of pedigree when it comes to kakenage, and both got a win with the technique on Nakabi. Matsuda moves his career tally to nine, while Akua is only one behind. For good measure, Matsuda also collected his third nichonage win here. New Yokozuna Kisenosato secured the early kachi-koshi on Nakabi, producing the first kotehineri of the year against Shohozan. Fellow Yokozuna Harumafuji also got in on that act, claiming the first komatasukui of 2017 against Takayasu. Other kimarite making their first appearance of the year are nimaigeri, kainahineri and uchimuso. Nankairiki takes his uchimuso tally to 16 with that. It's always a nice treat to see a well-executed shitatehineri. There were seven in total here, and for the first time in five years three of them were in the Makuuchi division. Ishiura's first and then Yoshikaze's win are the pick of the bunch. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Speaking of which, the missing Juryo kettei-sen kimarite was tsukidashi. I can't figure out how to do one of those blue tag deals to alert Doitsuyama to that. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 3 0 0 2 2 0 7 0.30% Amiuchi 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08% Ashitori 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 0.17% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 4 1 3 3 4 1 16 0.68% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 31 20 34 65 46 7 203 8.61% Hikiotoshi 13 7 9 23 23 0 75 3.18% Hikkake 0 0 2 1 1 0 4 0.17% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Isamiashi 0 1 0 0 4 1 6 0.25% Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kainahineri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Kakenage 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0.13% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 4 1 0 2 4 0 11 0.47% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 0 0 1 6 7 0 14 0.59% Kimetaoshi 0 0 1 1 3 0 5 0.21% Kirikaeshi 0 1 0 1 1 0 3 0.13% Komatasukui 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Koshikudake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kotenage 3 1 4 13 15 1 37 1.57% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 0 1 1 2 0 4 0.17% Makiotoshi 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 0.13% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Okuridashi 8 8 17 29 21 2 85 3.60% Okurigake 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Okuritaoshi 0 0 1 5 7 0 13 0.55% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 66 50 121 172 135 36 580 24.60% Oshitaoshi 6 8 19 23 20 7 83 3.52% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 2 1 2 3 4 0 12 0.51% Shitatehineri 3 0 1 3 0 0 7 0.30% Shitatenage 4 5 10 17 16 3 55 2.33% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Sotogake 0 0 1 2 5 0 8 0.34% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 7 2 9 13 13 1 45 1.91% Susoharai 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Tottari 1 1 3 1 0 0 6 0.25% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 8 9 13 15 8 4 57 2.42% Tsukihiza 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Tsukiotoshi 23 11 18 42 34 3 131 5.56% Tsukitaoshi 1 1 4 2 2 2 12 0.51% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 2 0 0 0 2 0 4 0.17% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchimuso 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 0 2 3 0 5 0.21% Uwatedashinage 6 5 10 6 6 2 35 1.48% Uwatehineri 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Uwatenage 7 12 23 31 26 7 106 4.50% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0.08% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 90 54 87 152 153 34 570 24.17% Yoritaoshi 8 9 9 38 50 15 129 5.47% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
  9. So we've already lost Yusei to retirement, but it looks like I missed another brother - Tokitsukaze-beya's Hayasaka is likely the younger brother of Hamayutaka. Finally, here's a glimpse of new yobidashi Daiki in action during his first basho. He hasn't quite gotten the hang of the sonkyo position yet, so Setsuo gives him a helping hand.
  10. A few pictures from Hokutoryu's danpatsu-shiki which was held on senshuraku. He and Yamahibiki-oyakata (former Maegashira Ganyu) made their ozumo debut together in March 1986, and evidently it was quite an emotional moment when the time came for the shisho to make the final cut. And now to Ryuonami, a post-final-bout hanamichi shot and then danpatsu-shiki. Yusei also participated in his shussehiro, and I'm struggling to recall any other post-maezumo retirees who did that. Makes his intai even more odd. One other note, Tokinowaka retired after a 17-year career and had his danpatsu-shiki at some point between Hatsu and Haru. He has returned to his hometown to study and will eventually take over the family business.
  11. Nice thing I learned as a result of Tamakongo's yusho - while at Ushiku High School he was coached by former Juryo Mutetsuyama, who sadly passed away a few months before Tamakongo joined ozumo. For the shussehiro at his hatsu dohyo, Tamakongo wore one of Mutetsuyama's kesho-mawashi. It was arranged by Kataonami-oyakata (former Sekiwake Tamakasuga), he and Mutetsuyama were on the sumo team together at Chuo University. Possibly the third kanji in Tamakongo's shikona is also a tribute to Mutetsuyama, as it was his given name, but I don't know that for sure.
  12. Some real sumo spirit was on display today from Hanakaze and Amamidake. They got locked in a yotsu-zumo battle, and after 4 minutes 12 seconds a halt was called by the shimpan, who ordered a ni-ban-go torinaoshi. In the second attempt, 46-year-old Hanakaze got an uwate grip and managed to force Amamidake out for an okuridashi win, securing his kachi-koshi as a result. Not a henka in sight. Pictures and (linked) videos. It's the second basho in a row in which a ni-ban-go torinaoshi has happened early in the day, in January it was Kyonosato who eventually prevailed over Daishiryu on Day 12.
  13. Hokutoryu has announced his retirement after 31 years on the ozumo dohyo, signing off with a win which secured his kachi-koshi. He made his debut in March 1986 as one of the earliest recruits to the new heya established by former Yokozuna Kitanoumi. With his retirement, Hanakaze stands alone as the last remaining rikishi to have made his debut in the Showa era. As the ironman of the lower divisions, Hokutoryu chalked up 1,169 consecutive bouts which is a record for a rikishi without sekitori experience. That came to an end in 2014 after he suffered diabetes-related problems with his left foot, requiring surgery to remove the big toe. With the encouragement of Kitanoumi he overcame that and we saw the unlikely occurrence of a 43-year-old participating in maezumo. Hokutoryu's intention was to continue until Kitanoumi reached the mandatory retirement age (which would have been in May 2018), but sadly Kitanoumi passed away in November 2015. Hokutoryu pledged to continue at least until the first anniversary of his death and then carry on if he felt able. However, in January this year he suffered the first zenpai (0-7) record of his career, which made him realise that the end was near. He shed a few tears when discussing his former shisho with the reporters in the hanamichi. A few pictures in the box.
  14. Yes, I was only looking for two stablemates as the only leaders, but should've included that in the post. Thanks.
  15. As far as I can tell, Kisenosato and Takayasu are the first pair of stablemates to be unbeaten after Day 8 in almost 43 years (in cases where only two rikishi were unbeaten). The last time seems to be the 1974 Natsu basho, when Mihogaseki-beya duo Kitanoumi and Masuiyama started 8-0. A bit further down the ranks (and a bit easier to check with a query), Meisei improved to 5-0 with a win in Juryo against Asahisho, and looks good for a return to that division. Since the start of the seven-bout era in 1960, he is the 8th rikishi to earn his 5th win on Day 8, and the first since Ushiomaru in the 2005 Natsu basho. (Late edit in italics.)