Yubinhaad

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  1. Hello all, here are the kimarite statistics for the final basho of 2017. Now with 100% fewer crappy charts! Many, many thanks are due to Doitsuyama for keeping the database going, and to Asashosakari for his video coverage of the lower divisions. The basho saw Yokozuna Hakuho claim an unprecedented 40th Makuuchi yusho, despite letting himself down with a ludicrous temper tantrum on Day 11. Lucky for him, throwing your toys out of the pram isn't an official kimarite, so he won't be appearing in the table below. Moving on to the actual techniques, Amanoshima put together another kachi-koshi with some rare kimarite. Ashitori is his stock-in-trade and provided two of his wins here, taking his career total to 24. His other wins were more notable, coming from kimarite that he hasn't used before. A nice ipponzeoi shoulder throw took care of Okoryu, while veteran Shunba found himself being "backwards leaned" out of the dohyo by ushiromotare. Day 10 provided a couple of zori-te, first a nice izori win at the edge for Satozakura, and then an excellent tasukizori from Kaishu. Tagonofuji has shown his leg trip abilities before, but this basho he deployed kawazugake for the first time, and then for a second time two days later. He's only the third rikishi in the available records to get two kawazugake wins in a single basho. For the second basho in a row, Wakasatake - soon to branch out with the new Nishiiwa-beya - won two bouts with a susoharai footsweep; unfortunately this time they were his only wins in a make-koshi result. In total there were five susoharai here, the most in a basho for just over 12 years. Where all-division results are available, it's the 8th basho to reach that number. Three kimarite kept us waiting but finally made their first appearance of the year in this basho. Terutsuyoshi had little to shout about in a rather poor tournament for him, but on Day 9 he did pull off a superb koshinage, followed by some superb glaring, against Takagenji. Elsewhere, Torakio demonstrated the relative difference in strength between him and some Jonidan opponents this basho, becoming the first rikishi to win twice with okuritsuriotoshi. The final kimarite to make its annual debut here was koshikudake. There should have been a chongake in this basho too in my opinion, as I suggested here, however it was called an uchigake instead. It would have been the first chongake of the year (the first for almost three years in fact), but that's how it goes. One kimarite that did get corrected was Aonosho's win on Day 12, originally announced in the arena as an oshitaoshi, but later changed to a fairly rare kotehineri, the second armlock twist down we've seen this year. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 0 0 0 2 2 0 4 0.17% Amiuchi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ashitori 0 0 1 2 0 1 4 0.17% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 6 0 1 3 2 2 14 0.59% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 0.13% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 27 20 39 58 47 5 196 8.28% Hikiotoshi 11 10 6 19 23 4 73 3.09% Hikkake 2 1 0 1 0 0 4 0.17% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Isamiashi 0 0 0 4 4 0 8 0.34% Izori 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Kainahineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kakenage 0 1 0 0 4 0 5 0.21% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 9 0 7 4 5 0 25 1.06% Kawazugake 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Kekaeshi 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 0.13% Kimetaoshi 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08% Kirikaeshi 1 1 0 0 2 0 4 0.17% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Koshinage 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kotehineri 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kotenage 6 1 13 10 8 0 38 1.61% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 0 2 2 3 0 7 0.30% Makiotoshi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuridashi 9 5 15 18 21 3 71 3.00% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurinage 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0.08% Okuritaoshi 0 1 6 5 4 2 18 0.76% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 66 47 107 191 159 45 615 25.99% Oshitaoshi 9 5 13 33 32 10 102 4.31% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 0 0 1 3 1 1 6 0.25% Shitatehineri 1 1 1 1 3 3 10 0.42% Shitatenage 3 2 7 12 18 5 47 1.99% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotogake 0 1 1 2 1 0 5 0.21% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 5 7 5 8 16 2 43 1.82% Susoharai 0 1 0 1 3 0 5 0.21% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tottari 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 9 3 7 9 1 0 29 1.23% Tsukihiza 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08% Tsukiotoshi 19 9 27 37 33 6 131 5.54% Tsukitaoshi 2 2 5 1 2 0 12 0.51% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0.13% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Uchimuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Utchari 0 0 2 3 5 0 10 0.42% Uwatedashinage 3 5 7 4 4 0 23 0.97% Uwatehineri 0 2 0 0 1 0 3 0.13% Uwatenage 13 13 23 26 30 5 110 4.65% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0.08% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 73 50 94 164 176 37 594 25.11% Yoritaoshi 4 14 15 28 44 10 115 4.86% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri was the most common kimarite of the year, accounting for 25.40% of the 14,509 honwari torikumi. However, 2017 saw the narrowest gap of any calendar year in the current kimarite era, with oshidashi following closely behind at 25.11%. Overall, it was a more diverse year for kimarite than 2016, with 70 out of 87 kimarite being used at least once. After drawing a blank last year, izori made a comeback with three appearances this time. Kubihineri was also used three times (all in the Hatsu basho, strangely) and sabaori made one appearance, both having been unused since 2014. Also notable this year are some of the kimarite introduced in the last expansion of the kimarite list in 2001. The rarest of them, okurigake, was used for only the second time since the expansion, while okuritsuridashi and osakate reappeared after being unused in recent years. Tokkurinage was used no less than nine times, five more than in any prior year. On the other hand, okurihikiotoshi drew a blank for the first time, having previously averaged three bouts per year. Unused kimarite in 2017: Chongake Gasshohineri Kakezori Kozumatori Mitokorozeme Okurihikiotoshi Omata Shumokuzori Sotokomata Sotomuso Sototasukizori Susotori Tsukaminage Tsumatori Waridashi Yaguranage Yobimodoshi Thanks for reading!
  2. New Juryo for Hatsu 2018

    Like all new sekitori Akua must now consider what colour he wants his shimekomi to be, with help from some stablemates and yobidashi Yuto.
  3. Retirees after Kyushu 2017

    Sad to see Suekawa call it a day, he overcame two lengthy injury absences before, but being kyujo in the last two basho suggests injury struck again. He will return to his hometown of Ebino, Miyazaki prefecture. The city's mayor, Takaaki Muraoka, was among those making a cut in the danpatsu-shiki, although not one of those in the handful of pictures. Kasuganami was the longest-serving rikishi from Kasugayama/Nakagawa-beya, retiring after a 19-year career. He received a bouquet of flowers following his final bout on Day 13, in which he signed off with a win. His danpatsu-shiki is set to take place on December 23rd, it seems he will then be working in the kitchen of a shrine. (I wonder if it's Heiken-ji in Kawasaki, where his former stablemates had their mass danpatsu-shiki exactly a year earlier on that date) Also receiving a bouquet of flowers was Tomiyama, who retires after a dozen years in sumo. His danpatsu-shiki took place at the end of the basho but I haven't found any pictures of that, unfortunately. Mutsumi's danpatsu-shiki took place following the Aki basho, a few pictures were posted here.
  4. Sumo Reference Updates

    Just noticed while preparing the kimarite notes that the Sandanme yusho kettei-sen bout hasn't been added to the database. I don't know whether it's the cause, but for some odd reason the kimarite (oshidashi) is given in Japanese on the English side of the Kyokai site.
  5. Rikishi Status Kyushu 2017 - Final

    Two weeks rest required for Myogiryu, it says in the press. Indeed, he comes up to fight Daiseido. I'm just hoping it won't be his last bout with an oichomage.
  6. Basho Talk Kyushu 2017 (SPOILERS)

    First bout I've seen where the slow-mo replay looked like the full speed of many bouts! I saw a Toki bout once where he was doing that kind of rapid-fire tsuppari, but backpedalling at the same time because the opponent was unmoved. Funny stuff.
  7. Rikishi Status Kyushu 2017 - Final

    Myogiryu is out for Day 14 due to a meniscus injury in the left knee. Shodai will get the fusensho, while Myogiryu will sadly fall to make-koshi.
  8. Basho Talk Kyushu 2017 (SPOILERS)

    Mizuguchi (previously Shoho) was the performer in 2015 Hatsu, his final time with the bow.
  9. Basho Talk Kyushu 2017 (SPOILERS)

    If you mean a mid-basho situation, the last such example was Musashifuji, who saw the 2003 Kyushu basho through to the end after Musashimaru's intai halfway through. That was never going to happen here though due to all the conflicting stories and facts up in the air with Harumafuji's scandal. Minanosato had one more basho after Asashoryu's intai before handing the bow to Chiyonohana.
  10. Basho Talk Kyushu 2017 (SPOILERS)

    Satonofuji has today become the most prolific yumitori-shiki performer of the Heisei era, with his 418th performance moving him ahead of Wakakaze. It also puts him into second place on the all-time list of most performances, although I think it's unlikely he'll reach Edonohana's record of 637. Artwork I stumbled across a while back:
  11. Rikishi Status Kyushu 2017 - Final

    Reports that Takayasu is out for Day 13, he was clearly limping after his bout today. Goeido will get the fusensho.
  12. Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Kyushu 2017

    I'd definitely cheer a long-awaited Ryuden promotion to Makuuchi. He showed a lot of patience and spirit in overcoming his injury troubles, and of the 11 rikishi to have spent the whole year in Juryo he has the best overall record. Homarefuji has had four decent basho, but unfortunately at J1 he picked the worst time to have a bad result. Kyokutaisei too has picked up four kachi-koshi, so a promotion for him would also be welcome although he looks like an outsider in that race. I want Tsurugisho to finish 8-7 here, a perfectly even record for the year would befit the current King of Middle Juryo. Overall record as of Day 12: Ryuden 48-39 Homarefuji 45-42 Kyokutaisei 45-42 Tsurugisho 43-44 Amakaze 42-45 Terutsuyoshi 42-45 Azumaryu 41-46 Yamaguchi 41-46 Hidenoumi 40-47 Kotoeko 40-47 Seiro 38-49
  13. Videos -Kyushu 2017- Promo and Days 1-15

    I wanted to mention the bout below, so I took the liberty of doing the links since I was watching through them all anyway. Thanks! Strange kimarite decision on this one - it's quite clear that Omote's leg trip is left-to-left (that is to say, his left foot is behind Daiseiryu's left foot), which should make it a chongake. For some reason though it was called uchigake. Oh, and in another good bout, I really felt for Hamatensei, he put in a good effort only to see the mono-ii overturn the decision and give the win to Tokio. I thought it should've been a torinaoshi, but having said that Hamatensei did seem to hurt his shoulder so it's perhaps for the best that he didn't have to fight again immediately.
  14. New recruits for Kyushu 2017

    Turns out Takagi is also in that 2016 Inter-High results PDF - he was a member of the sumo team at Niinagakuen Asahigaoka High School along with stablemate Sakurafuji (Yano) who entered ozumo a year ago and encouraged Takagi to join him in Isegahama-beya. They both helped in winning the school's first Kanagawa prefectural team title in June 2016, a couple of months before the Inter-High. Time for a total stab in the dark - maybe his shikona is Shinfuji, with 新 being the first character of the school name (新名学園旭丘高). Takagi in the school keikoba: Thanks very much for the videos and comprehensive coverage as always!
  15. New recruits for Kyushu 2017

    Urakaze had to wipe away tears at the end.