Yubinhaad

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Yubinhaad last won the day on November 30

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  1. Yubinhaad

    Takayoshitoshi scandal

    It was apparently being considered from a few months ago, but with the general turmoil surrounding the heya and shisho it was shelved. I don't buy the fresh start idea really, the first kanji is still from Takanohana, a fresh start would have made it 隆 from Takamisugi (Chiganoura) instead, no? Anyway it's a good thing, Takanofuji is much more along traditional lines and replaces one of my least favourite shikona on the banzuke.
  2. Yubinhaad

    New recruits for Hatsu 2019

    Joining Sadogatake-beya is 17-year-old Koki Susumu (進 洸希) from Ibigawa town in Ibi District, Gifu prefecture. Currently a third-year student and member of the judo department at Chukyo High School in Mizunami, Gifu. The former principal of the school is a close friend of the heya's koenkai chairman, and through them Susumu received an invitation to visit the heya, which he did in his first year at the school. After several more visits he decided he would later join ozumo. Sadogatake-oyakata (former Sekiwake Kotonowaka) visited the school for a press conference with his new deshi.
  3. Yubinhaad

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Kyushu 2018

    Well the tomorrow I envisioned clearly ran late, but to complete that: out of 75 extra bouts fought by a Makushita rikishi, only 5 took place on Day 14. Banryunada in 1963 Hatsu, Akashiumi in 1964 Kyushu, then the double duty by Hakusan and Sanofuji in 1984 Natsu, and finally Tamaki this basho. So yes, very rare. It was more fluid down in Jonokuchi from the late 60s (when hoshitori data becomes available) until the turn of the century. 28 extra bouts were fought on Day 14, and 41 more on senshuraku. And then as I mentioned previously, for whatever reason after that there was an almost total change, with most extra bouts since 2000 taking place on Day 14. There's also an extraordinary case in Jonidan in 1972 Haru. This was during an odd period where some young rikishi only competed in Tokyo basho and for only a few bouts (I know I've read about that here, but I can't think of how to search for it). Perhaps that's why they had to go up the ranks to find Wakamaeda for an extra bout. And since I'm in the thread, a note about Jonokuchi yusho winner Hatooka. He suffered a torn patellar tendon during keiko in December 2017 and had surgery to repair it. After missing four complete basho, he was able to fight one bout in September to stay on the banzuke, and this basho made a full return to win the yusho. He's found plenty of comradeship and inspiration in Kise-beya, with stablemates Ura, Shuji and Jokoryu also having suffered lengthy injury breaks but also making successful comebacks. I'm also waiting for that to happen, but so far of the ten to have done it twice, it's been five in Makushita, five in Jonokuchi.
  4. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke Surfing Kyushu 2018 (9th Wave)

    Thanks to the two rijicho of the 9th Wave, Randomitsuki and Jakusotsu. Three players chalked up streaks of 10 consecutive kachi-koshi in this wave: Jakusotsu (2014 Hatsu to 2015 Nagoya), Charliki (2014 Aki to 2016 Haru) and Achiyama (2016 Natsu to 2017 Kyushu). Ganzohnesushi's picks collected the most yusho, with a total of 7 in his 36 basho. A-Y overview of the players in this wave: Player Basho W-L-A Yusho Achiyama 36 141-99-12 1 Andoreasu 36 164-96 3 Asashosakari 6 31-7-4 3 Ayagawa 27 173-93-11 2 Azumashida 5 24-7-4 2 Charliki 20 133-63 4 Chishafuwaku 25 106-69 2 Doitsuyama 16 70-38-4 4 Fukurou 35 134-109-2 2 Ganzohnesushi 36 224-152-4 7 Gurowake 24 98-60-10 2 Hironoumi 22 98-56 1 Holleshoryu 15 44-54-7 0 Itachi 20 96-44 1 Jakusotsu 36 156-95-1 2 Jejima 35 138-109-14 2 Kaiowaka 9 33-30 0 Kameumi 1 6-1 0 Koorifuu 2 9-5 0 Kotoviki 20 67-70-3 0 Kuroimori 35 144-100-1 2 Mmikasazuma 3 17-4 1 Randomitsuki 25 116-67 2 Senkoho 28 123-73 0 Takanorappa 7 28-21 0 Terarno 34 133-105 1 Tsukiko 3 11-10 0 Vikanohara 16 76-36 1 Wakatake 1 3-4 0 Wamahada 34 124-91-23 2 Yamasanzan 2 8-6 0 Yubinhaad 36 142-110 4
  5. Hello all, here are the kimarite statistics for the final basho of 2018, which saw a rare Komusubi yusho as Takakeisho proved to be the strongest of the depleted upper ranks. No Makuuchi rikishi managed to record a kachi-koshi in all six basho of the year for the first time since 2003. But a round of applause for Daishoho who managed to do it in the Juryo ranks - he's the first to do that in the same year since Katsunishiki in 1975. The last to chalk up six in a row in Juryo was Asahisato in 1993/4. Moving on to the techniques, kekaeshi was more popular than usual this basho, with four appearances in total. Tobizaru collected two of the wins in Juryo, the first time that's been done in the Heisei era (Tochitsurugi was the last to do it, in 1987 Kyushu). In fact I think there should have been five kekaeshi, but whoever was on duty as kimarite-gakari decided that Ezuka's successful second attempt against Kiryu was a ketaguri instead. Having fallen to the first make-koshi of his short career, Tanahashi bounced back on the final day, weathering the initial attack of freshly-renamed Dainichido and toppling him with an excellent chongake. Of the three uchigake here, the third was the most interesting, as Enho applied a leg grab right at the end which might have turned it into a mitokorozeme. But I think it really came too late to have any meaningful impact on the outcome so it stays as an uchigake, which is fair enough. Day 6 brought two komatasukui wins in Jonidan and Sandanme - although frankly I thought the first one would be a koshikudake, I can't see any leg grab at all. There were two okurihikiotoshi in this basho, both produced by Sakaigawa-beya rikishi. Sadanoumi's hikkake (or tottari) attempt wasn't quite enough to beat Daieisho, but it did give him the winning position to pull him down from behind. In the second bout, Sadanohana kept tricky Amanoshima at arms length and coped admirably with his twisting and turning in an entertaining finish. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08% Amiuchi 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Ashitori 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 0.16% Chongake 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 4 0 1 2 1 0 8 0.32% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 30 20 40 57 49 11 207 8.39% Hikiotoshi 9 13 14 25 13 1 75 3.04% Hikkake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Isamiashi 0 0 0 3 4 0 7 0.28% Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kainahineri 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08% Kakenage 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 2 3 2 7 5 1 20 0.81% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 1 2 0 1 0 0 4 0.16% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Kimedashi 2 1 2 4 0 0 9 0.36% Kimetaoshi 0 1 2 2 0 0 5 0.20% Kirikaeshi 0 1 1 1 2 1 6 0.24% Komatasukui 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08% Koshikudake 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08% Kotenage 10 1 6 10 8 1 36 1.46% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 1 2 1 1 1 6 0.24% Makiotoshi 0 1 1 4 0 0 6 0.24% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuridashi 3 4 31 20 36 3 97 3.93% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0.08% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritaoshi 1 1 3 3 5 1 14 0.57% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 75 56 101 195 155 46 628 25.45% Oshitaoshi 9 11 7 24 14 8 73 2.96% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 0 0 1 2 0 1 4 0.16% Shitatehineri 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 0.16% Shitatenage 5 7 12 16 12 3 55 2.23% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Sotogake 0 0 2 4 1 0 7 0.28% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 10 3 9 12 17 5 56 2.27% Susoharai 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Tottari 2 0 0 2 2 0 6 0.24% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 7 6 12 7 9 1 42 1.70% Tsukihiza 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0.08% Tsukiotoshi 23 9 18 36 35 1 122 4.94% Tsukitaoshi 1 0 2 2 2 0 7 0.28% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 0.12% Uchimuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 1 3 2 0 6 0.24% Uwatedashinage 1 3 8 6 8 0 26 1.05% Uwatehineri 1 0 1 1 1 1 5 0.20% Uwatenage 13 3 14 35 48 14 127 5.15% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 1 0 2 0 1 0 4 0.16% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 71 56 98 154 212 50 641 25.97% Yoritaoshi 11 5 16 24 54 14 124 5.02% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi was the most common kimarite in 2018, accounting for 25.77% of the 14,803 torikumi this year. This is the 27th year for which complete all-division kimarite data is available, and the first time that oshidashi has topped the charts. Also notable is the number of fusen bouts this year, 102. While it's worth noting that at least three had nothing to do with injury (Takayoshitoshi, Hikarugenji, Shingaku...), it's still the first time fusen has reached three figures since 1993. Overall, 69 kimarite were used this year (not counting fusen and hansoku), one less than in 2017. Among the comebacks were rarities gasshohineri and tsukaminage, both having been unused for a decade. Chongake and kozumatori also returned after a couple of years out of use. The unused kimarite were: Kakezori Koshinage Mitokorozeme Okuritsuridashi Okuritsuriotoshi Omata Osakate Sabaori Shumokuzori Sotokomata Sotomuso Sototasukizori Susotori Tsumatori Ushiromotare Waridashi Yaguranage Yobimodoshi Ushiromotare usually gets at least one accidental/comical appearance, this year drawing a blank for only the third time since it was introduced in 2001. Thanks to Doitsuyama for the database, to Miselet for the videos, and to you for reading!
  6. Yubinhaad

    Retirees after Aki 2018

    The okamisan belatedly posted some pictures from Tetsuyuzan's danpatsu-shiki shortly before the Kyushu basho, so before I forget here they are. Haven't found any for the Kyushu retirees yet, although Musashigawa promises some for Buken at some point.
  7. Yubinhaad

    Latest kabu-babu changes

    I forgot to mention, there's a line in the Kyokai's business report for last year, he acquired the myoseki as of March 24th 2017. 平成29年3月24日 年寄名跡春日山を勢こと東口翔太が継承すること
  8. Yubinhaad

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Kyushu 2018

    I think it's very rare indeed, in fact you might have the answer there already with 1984 Natsu. I have a bit more checking to do (tomorrow hopefully), but so far I haven't found any later cases of a Makushita rikishi fighting an 8th bout on Day 14. In recent times it's been Jonokuchi rikishi who fight the 8th bout on Day 14 - since 2000 only two (out of 40) have fought their extra bout on Senshuraku, Koseki in 2003 Haru and Ishiharayama in 2013 Aki. Tamaki is the 10th rikishi to fight an 8th bout twice, and the first since Hanai (Kyonosato) in 2015 Natsu and Nagoya.
  9. Yubinhaad

    Kyushu Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    Farewell then, Satoyama. I can think of no more fitting way to retire than with a gyakuten kachi-koshi, back against the wall and still leaving everything on the dohyo, tenacious to the end. Check out his first win this basho, a 90-second slog against hefty Tokushinho. Today's win against Kotokamatani was much shorter but with a great finish. Some pictures of those bouts are in the box below.
  10. Yubinhaad

    Kyushu Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    Kintamayama beat me to it about Aoiyama stubbing his toe(s). I thought it was a slip as well until I noticed him reaching down to check them straight away.
  11. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi Status Kyushu 2018 - D14 Late Withdraw

    Press report that Arawashi is doing what he probably should have done at the start and will be kyujo from Day 13, due to a left knee injury. Chiyonokuni will get the free win which should secure his Makuuchi place.
  12. Yubinhaad

    Lower-division Torikumi Kyushu Basho 2018

    27 Isenohana (Jd22e) 1-5 Terunosato (Jd32e) 1-5 Terunosato joins the club as we get a second 40+ bout in this basho, the first time that's happened to my knowledge. Combined age of 84 years, 8 months and some days. It's also the first meeting for these two veterans.
  13. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi Status Kyushu 2018 - D14 Late Withdraw

    Press report that Goeido is kyujo from Day 12, due to a right arm injury sustained back on Day 7 against Shodai (I do recall seeing him flex it afterwards). Good thing he secured his kachi-koshi today. Mitakeumi will even his record at 6-6 with the freebie.
  14. Yubinhaad

    Day 11 pics overview Kyushu 2018

    Impact!! (Not the most flattering angle for Ichinojo...)
  15. Yubinhaad

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Kyushu 2018

    3-1 Sd18e Masunoyama Chiganoura 27 22 Good to see Masunoyama coming back up the ranks once again, he clinched his kachi-koshi yesterday. He had back surgery in June after doctors discovered that he was suffering ossification of the ligamentum flavum, causing the spine to be compressed and numbness of his legs and feet. Ahead of the Aki basho (in which he finished 6-1) he was able to do suriashi without any problems for the first time in several months. He has quite a big scar on his back, which can just about be seen in this hanamichi picture.