Yubinhaad

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Yubinhaad last won the day on December 2 2017

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  1. New recruits for Haru 2018

    Joining Arashio-beya is 15-year-old Taiga Tanji? (丹治 大賀) from Fukushima city. Currently a tall and slender 183cm and 68kg, he participated in rhythmic gymnastics from kindergarten through to the end of elementary school thanks to the influence of his Russian mother Natalia, who was herself a rhythmic gymnast. He made the unlikely switch to sumo in the second year of junior high. His initial goal is to become a sekitori, although of course his dream is to become the first Yokozuna from Fukushima. Arashio-oyakata (former Komusubi Oyutaka) is appreciative of Tanji's sporting background as he has great flexibility and core strength.
  2. Nishiiwa-beya preparations

    The groundbreaking ceremony for Nishiiwa-beya's premises took place in June last year. Construction fell slightly behind schedule due to bad winter weather but should be completed well in time for the heya's return from Osaka after the Haru basho. The shisho returned to his home prefecture of Aomori to source some hiba logs, which will be used to make the heya signboard, teppo poles and kamidana (the small Shinto shrine in the keikoba). Groundbreaking ceremony. Construction underway. Taking his deshi to visit the site. Back in Aomori to find the logs.
  3. Games Talk Hatsu 2018

    Regarding Hoshitori, it's the fifth sub-1000pt yusho since 1996 Aki (scoring system was different before then). Shatsume's winning score of 915 is indeed the lowest of those five, "surpassing" Kirinoumi's 948pt yusho from 2002 Kyushu. Shatsume is the first Hoshitori debutant to record three daily top scores in a basho. Not to be outdone, Suwihuto also got three and even did it on three consecutive days, making him the fourth player to accomplish that. This is the first time two players have recorded three daily top scores in the same basho. Jejima and Susanoo continue their battle to collect the most daily top scores overall - they are now tied with 32 each.
  4. Retirees after Hatsu 2018

    He's not on the list this time, but certainly a notable retirement is 41-year-old Kyokuhikari, the second longest-serving rikishi, after 26 years on the dohyo. He made his debut in March 1992 and was the last survivor of the enormous class of 152 rikishi who entered then. Kyokuhikari won all seven bouts in the 1999 Aki basho, but lost in the yusho kettei-sen against Tochisakae, who was making his comeback after injury knocked him down from the sekitori ranks. Here are a few pictures from Kyokuhikari's danpatsu-shiki. One other note, Tatsunami-beya's Sandanme gyoji Kimura Toyohiko has also retired after eight years in the job. I'm rather sad about that as he was one of the most vocally distinctive gyoji.
  5. Sansho for 2018 Hatsu

    Bit late, but I just found this Daily Sports article which gives the following numbers: Shukun-sho: Tochinoshin, 28 votes. Awarded. Kanto-sho: Ryuden, 25 votes. Awarded. Kanto-sho: Abi, 23 votes, conditional on winning final bout. Awarded. Gino-sho: Tochinoshin, 27 votes. Awarded. Shukun-sho: Endo, 10 votes, not awarded. I was of the opinion that the sansho articles in the press largely parroted each other, the same general information with minor variations here and there. I'll have to try and pay more attention from now on, in case more detailed results show up somewhere like this.
  6. Hello all, here are the kimarite statistics for all divisions after the opening basho of 2018. Maegashira rikishi were the stars of the show here - Tochinoshin put his migi-yotsu skills to good use to win a hard-earned first Makuuchi yusho, as well as a couple of sansho. Elsewhere, Hokutofuji won a kinboshi for the fourth consecutive basho to equal Tosanoumi's record. Yoshikaze won two kinboshi on consecutive days, becoming the first rikishi to do that twice. Finally, Ryuden and Abi were both rewarded with a Kanto-sho for their fine performances in their Makuuchi debut. We also say farewell to Kitataiki (now Onogawa-oyakata), who announced his retirement at the start of the basho. He had more sotogake wins than any other active rikishi and was also the only active rikishi with a mitokorozeme win. Terutsuyoshi began his basho with a rare kozumatori ankle pick win against fellow former Juryo Asabenkei. It's the first kozumatori since 2015 Kyushu, and only the 17th overall since it was introduced in the 2001 kimarite expansion. Later in the basho, Terutsuyoshi clinched his kachi-koshi with a nice kakenage win against Enho. Two bouts after Terutsuyoshi's kakenage, Tobizaru also secured kachi-koshi with a sakatottari win against Akua (it's the second of the video links there, the first was their original bout which led to a torinaoshi). Matsuda brought his eight-bout losing streak to an end with the 5th nichonage of his career, unfortunately not caught on video. In the available records only Toseima has more nichonage wins, with 10. With his older brother absent for three straight basho, Amanoshima is doing his best to keep the ashitori coming, adding two more wins this basho. In fact I thought he had clinched his kachi-koshi with a third on Day 13, but it was called oshidashi instead. This was the 9th basho in the Heisei era to be hit with 8 fusen bouts in the sekitori divisions. Technically the record for the era is 9 from the 2005 Nagoya basho, however one of those was Makushita-ranked Gojoro who came up for a Juryo bout but withdrew due to injury (and never mounted the dohyo again). Fun fact - Hakuho had one of the fusenpai back then, too. For the third consecutive basho oshidashi was the most common kimarite, accounting for 26.20% of bouts. The 1.81% gap over yorikiri is the largest we have yet seen. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 0 2 1 0 1 1 5 0.21% Amiuchi 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Ashitori 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0.13% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Fusen (default) 6 2 4 6 3 3 24 1.01% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 21 16 33 55 51 5 181 7.64% Hikiotoshi 23 8 13 21 26 2 93 3.92% Hikkake 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 0.17% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Isamiashi 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 0.13% Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kainahineri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Kakenage 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 0.13% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 0 3 4 9 2 0 18 0.76% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 0 0 1 3 1 0 5 0.21% Kimetaoshi 0 0 1 3 0 0 4 0.17% Kirikaeshi 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 0.17% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kotenage 9 3 4 12 11 3 42 1.77% Kozumatori 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 0 2 4 5 0 11 0.46% Makiotoshi 0 0 1 3 0 0 4 0.17% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuridashi 6 4 19 22 21 3 75 3.16% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Okuritaoshi 0 0 6 4 5 1 16 0.68% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 78 38 102 172 188 43 621 26.20% Oshitaoshi 7 7 15 15 20 9 73 3.08% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Shitatedashinage 1 0 2 2 2 1 8 0.34% Shitatehineri 1 0 2 2 2 0 7 0.30% Shitatenage 7 3 11 21 14 4 60 2.53% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Sotogake 1 1 3 2 0 0 7 0.30% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 8 3 10 15 21 3 60 2.53% Susoharai 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tottari 2 0 2 2 1 0 7 0.30% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 19 3 10 9 3 0 44 1.86% Tsukihiza 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0.08% Tsukiotoshi 18 9 28 35 44 5 139 5.86% Tsukitaoshi 1 0 3 3 3 2 12 0.51% Tsukite 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 1 0 0 0 2 0 3 0.13% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchimuso 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0.13% Uwatedashinage 1 5 4 9 9 1 29 1.22% Uwatehineri 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Uwatenage 11 7 15 20 28 9 90 3.80% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 0.13% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 69 66 81 164 162 36 578 24.39% Yoritaoshi 8 4 19 33 38 6 108 4.56% Zubuneri 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0.08%
  7. Ex-Makuuchi Soutairyuu retires

    Sotairyu's danpatsu-shiki took place in the Kokukigan today, with around 300 participants. A few pictures in the box.
  8. Tokoyama

    Tokoyama are affiliated to a particular heya just the same as gyoji, yobidashi and so on. Regarding visits to other heya, Nishonoseki-beya's Tokoshima is a regular visitor to Sadogatake-beya, which has a lot of rikishi and only two lower-ranking tokoyama, whereas Nishonoseki has far fewer rikishi and another high-ranking tokoyama to take care of them. The two heya are in the same ichimon but geography is also important here, they are a few miles from each other in Chiba prefecture. I imagine other heya probably have similar arrangements, but that's the only one I know the specifics of. From the archives, Tokoshima with Kotootori:
  9. Retirees after Hatsu 2018

    Hokutogo was the longest-serving rikishi in Hakkaku-beya, having joined ozumo back in 1996. He signed off with a win in his final bout. Tokkoriki retires after nine years, he had been suffering with calf injuries in both legs for some time. Before joining ozumo at the relatively late age of 22 he was a care worker, and apparently he will return to that occupation in the future. Isshinryu retires after almost 15 years in ozumo, joining Kitanoumi-beya in 2003. He was a yotsu-zumo specialist and was particularly strong at belt throws, even managing an all-shitatenage kachi-koshi last year. He has secured a job at a restaurant in Tokyo's Ginza district. Daitenpaku was one of four survivors from the previous Asahiyama-beya, which closed three years ago. He retires after a 14-year career in which he was ever-present, chalking up 574 consecutive bouts. After moving to Isegahama-beya he served as a tsukebito for Takarafuji and often wore his kesho-mawashi for his appearances in the jinku segment of jungyo events (shown below). Alas, I only found a single picture from the senshuraku party. As mentioned in the kyujo thread, Ogiryu suffered repeated shoulder injuries which never fully healed, so he calls it a day after almost five years. His danpatsu-shiki took place last month. He will (or maybe already has) return to his hometown of Sapporo, Hokkaido prefecture.
  10. Haru jungyo 2018

    And here's the handwritten version, or at least a rather bad photocopy of it. Maybe the Kyokai will repost a better version at some point.
  11. Basho Talk Hatsu 2018 (SPOILERS)

    This is also the case for gyoji in the lower divisions, those from Nishonoseki ichimon have been wearing some spiffy new outfits courtesy of Ozeki Takayasu this basho, as modelled here by Kimura Kazuma:
  12. Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Hatsu 2018

    No, for my trivia purposes it's just those who actually fight eight bouts, not those who had a kyujo but ended up getting that "8th round" bout. Fair point though. Happy for Kaisho, who celebrates his 23rd birthday with the Sandanme yusho. Maybe there's something to this shikona change stuff after all! Incidentally I learned the other day that the second kanji is in honour of his father, Katsumi. A few pictures in the box.
  13. Sansho for 2018 Hatsu

    Shukun-sho: Tochinoshin (1st) Kanto-sho: Ryuden (1st) Kanto-sho: Abi (1st, must win final bout) Gino-sho: Tochinoshin (2nd)
  14. Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Hatsu 2018

    Tamaki's hair is surely long enough by now for him to wear an oichomage for his first Juryo appearance. Takita fought an 8th bout down in Jonokuchi today, so this will be the 29th basho in the seven-bout era in which two rikishi have been needed to fight an 8th bout, and the first since 2015 Natsu.
  15. Kyujo Updates - 2018 Hatsu

    J12e Yamaguchi is kyujo for Day 14, which gives Tokushoryu a free win and kachi-koshi.