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  1. 24 points
  2. 23 points
    "Don't copy Hakuhou's manner!!" was the underlying tone of things as the YDC unanimously recommended Terunofuji's Yokozuna promotion. Member Mr. Sugita: "He dropped all the way to Johnny Dunne Jonidan and struggled hard to get back and that has deeply moved sumo fans. This is the Mongolian version of pride. A Yokozuna has to be an example for everyone. I hope he learns from Hakuhou's strength but not from his manners, and hope he becomes a magnificent Yokozuna." Mr. Yamauchi: "From here on he should conduct himself as a Yokozuna. I want him to be a beacon for all the children and all those who want to join sumo in the future. As an example, I'd like him to be like Ohtani from the Angels and be at his own level, being an example for everyone as a rikishi and as a Yokozuna. For people to support him, he has to be a worthy Yokozuna inside and outside of the ring." Mr. Tango: "He has truly done well to return. Hinkaku (dignity for want of another word, I guess..) is the pinnacle of sumo, to be strived for. He has shown that he can totally concentrate on sumo and I value that highly. Hakuhou's actions are regrettable, but this is Japan's national sport and hinkaku is important. I'd like him to polish his hinkaku by listening to his oyakata and to opinions of people surrounding him." Mr. Koumura: "His promotion goes without saying. What he has achieved is beyond description. I value that very highly. I want him to do sumo that is on the level, fair and square. So long as he doesn't aggravate his knee injuries, he should be a calm Yokozuna." Mr. Tokura: "Regarding Terunofuji, everyone was in agreement. Having a strict Oyakata, I expect him to become a Yokozuna who will practice aesthetic sumo." Mr. Oshima: "Making his way back from Jonidan and getting successive yushos, he faced the final day in Nagoya unbeaten. That story has touched the hearts of everyone. It's remarkable that he managed to take over the bashos where no Yokozuna was present. He has also grown mentally with his return. I want him to do Yokozuna - like sumo from here on. A Yokozuna is expected to be far more than an Ozeki. I want him to become a dai-Yokozuna, bearing that in mind." Mr. Dichne, honorary member: "Congrats man, you are awesome. Stay healthy and train for the rematch!!"
  3. 21 points
    Understood there is a thread speculating if Terunofuji will be made Yokozuna. But Nikkan Sports has stated that the YDC has unanimously voted for Terunofuji to be made the 73rd Yokozuna: https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/202107190000663.html and I think it deserves a thread all on its own. Congratulations, Yokozuna Terunofuji!
  4. 20 points
    I concur. Everyone always bangs on about his 45 yusho, but never mention that he didn’t win 58 yusho. Pff. Call me when he’s won more than he hasn’t.
  5. 19 points
    Whenever I feel like it.. Day1: Mitakeumi' demolishing Takanoshou: "I feel good. (tarararararara, I know that I should now..) I was able to do the sumo I imagined. I feel that I'm in good shape..' Takarafuji, being the tachimochi during Terunofuji's first Yokozuna dohyo-iri, looking at him and remembering the hardships he had endured: " I was watching his back, it was moist and seemed to shine.." Shoudai, losing his first bout, losing to Houshouryuu for the third straight time: "I didn't see a good image.. My tachiai was excellent, and I want to gambarize from tomorrow again. I want to show healthy sumo that won't show my age. It would be great if I could be involved in the yusho race..." Takakeishou, losing to Hokutofuji, and asked about his neck and in general about his condition: "I'm OK.. I wasn't especially nervous. I was planning on doing good sumo, but.." He answered quite weakly and seemed lacking self confidence, a cause for concern, says the reporter. Houshouryuu, beating Shoudai on day 1: "I was patient and that was good. I'd like to gambarize in order to be able to my own brand of sumo.." Hokutofuji, beating Takakeishou: "I was able to get a proper first step in and that was good. I always feel I need to move forward and I'm glad that I brought that feeling to the basho. An Ozeki is an Ozeki, kadoban or not. All I was thinking about was to move forward with all I had.." New Juryo Asashiyuu had surgery before the basho-right ankle. "It wasn't serious surgery.. There are still many things in Juryo I'm not used to, so I hope to gambarize and get used to stuff.." Ura, off to a 0-1 start: "Lost totally. There is a serious difference in power between us.. I will gambarize and aim for kachikoshi!" Tamawashi, beating his 13 year younger opponent (Kotonowaka) by yorikiri: "I knew if I would stop the moving the bout would become his pace so I kept moving my body till the end." Kotonowaka losing to the veteran Tamawashi: "He had a quick first move. By the time I reacted I was "swimming" and that was bad.." Kiribayama, beating new Sekiwake Meisei by hatakikomi: "I was patient and able to go with the flow and win. Win or lose, I want to do sumo as hard as I can.." Meisei, losing his first bout as a shin-Sekiwake: "Nothing good about what happened there. I planned on mounting the dohyo as usual but my body became rigid.."
  6. 19 points
    I interrupt your unseasonal dose of fandom wars to bring you the transcript of Hakuho's winner's interview (as requested by @Benihana): https://www.asahi.com/articles/ASP7L6JFSP7LUTQP01V.html Q: You've come back with a zensho yusho. A: Yes, it's the best. Q: You had an intense battle with Terunofuji. How did you feel about it? A: I didn't pay attention to thoughts that "my right knee wasn't good". I just gave my all. Q: What did you think when you won? A: Before the basho, I didn't think I could win with a zensho yusho. I'm really relieved. Q: Your family is here? (@Eikokurai: May be relevant to your last post) A: My four-year-old daughter just knew that her father was a sumo wrestler, but actually got to see it in action in good shape. I hope she remembers this. Q: What about your right knee surgery in March? A: I was wondering about the surgery. I thought I would never be able to mount the dohyo again. Q: What are your aims after this? A: This was my 899th win as a yokozuna. After 1 more I will be at 900. With the aim of [that] one win I will give my best. Q: [Your thoughts on] 15 days of a "do or die" basho. A: I went forward with the aim of gambarising for the Tokyo Olympics. Now we're here, and I could fulfil my promise to my father. It was a grave matter. I think it was good to have an aim like that. Q: What is the state of your knee? A: It fought for 15 days. If I couldn't have stepped up [to the dohyo] by myself, I would have always have had regrets till the very end. Thinking about various other things instead, I could step on the dohyo and achieve a zensho. Q: Was there a realisation to end it here? A: Let's not talk about that. Let me rest. Q: What about Terunofuji? A: For the 15 days, he was the only one who fought with that intensity. There was truly a sense of stability, and it was completely different from the Terunofuji who stood on the dohyo three years ago. Q: Is there a difference compared to previous championships? A: All my goals, dreams motivations, and records inspired me. Taiho said he lost his ambition after winning 32 times. I found meaning in that no one had won a yusho after 6 basho off. I set another record, and that is good.
  7. 18 points
    @Asashosakari will not be able to provide coverage of this topic this basho. I've covered before, and I am willing to do so again. It'll be about 8 hours before I get Day 8 up though, but it will come. Thanks for your patience.
  8. 18 points
    Hello All, It had certainly been a while since I posted on this forum, but I recently discovered an online colorizer that would enable me to take any image, including older sumo images, and colorize them. I tried it out with several photos, but I think the ones below turned out the best. It really gives these photos more life. The famous photo of 5 yokozuna in 1954 (Azumafuji (middle) had just retired and Tochinishiki (far left) had just succeeded in his rope run) A photo of the 38th Yokozuna Terukuni Futabayama's final dohyo iri at his retirement ceremony. He is attended by Haguroyama at left and Terukuni at right A seemingly interested Haguroyama (with a bandage of some sort on his chin) looks at a photographer during a jungyo. Chiyonoyama looks anxious while his tsukebito help him with the tsuna The 38th Yokozuna Tamanishiki poses with some civilians A very happy Tamanoumi and Kitanofuji show off their Zensho-Yushogaku's to the public I'll try to post more later when I have more time, but this was very interesting and I hope you guys like it!
  9. 17 points
    Here's footage of Terunofuji practising his dohyo-iri! Also a picture of a cheerful Isegahama-oyakata and the 73rd Yokozuna donning their new tsunas.
  10. 17 points
  11. 16 points
    Inspired by the Endless Romanisation thread some time ago, @Asojima and I bring to you: The Shikona Translations & Trivia Megathread! Originally this thread contained a list of sekitori shikona. Each shikona is followed by a spoiler tag, which contains the following information pertaining to the shikona: However, after the initial postings, various facts of shikona lore (and the relative insignificance of the translations) became apparent. We are therefore updating the original data sets to better show how sekitori shikona are formed from heya traditions, hometown allusions, and personal references; a project that we expect to take some time. In the meantime, the original lists are archived at the following link within the thread. The new format, split into three blocks, is as follows. The more salient parts are the first and second bits, which actually relate to the shikona's formation; the translations have been relegated to the third part as an archive of work done and a rough idea of the meaning of the kanji, although as noted below they do not necessarily denote what the shikona means to the rikishi. This overhaul also introduces two changes: annotations and traditional Hepburn romaji. As this is a fair amount of visual clutter, the annotations will be confined to the Shikona History section of each rikishi's entry, while traditional Hepburn romaji will be included for the rikishi's real name and full shikona at the top of the entry if applicable. Annotations follow in the following form: * (asterisk): Denotes a heya component of a shikona. ^ (carat): Denotes a geographical component of a shikona. ' (apostrophe): Denotes a personal component of a shikona (whether a reference to the rikishi's real name or other reference to events in their life). Parentheses group together separate kanji in a shikona that belong to the same component. For instance, one might see an annotation thus: Koto*-(te-bakari)'. This indicates that there are three kanji in the shikona, that the "koto" element is a heya component, and the two kanji for "tebakari" together are derived from a personal reference. As for romaji, the romanisation system used primarily in this thread is modern Hepburn (the type generally used across Japan today). However, in deference to Kintamayama-san, where the traditional Hepburn romanisation of the shikona differs from the modern Hepburn (e.g. when it contains a long vowel), the traditional Hepburn romanisation will follow after the modern Hepburn, separated by a slash, and substituting full spellings for macrons (because they're a pain in the ass to type on the forum). General notes on translation: The translation of the shikona is to a certain extent divorced from the meaning of the shikona to the individual rikishi. An example would be Asashoryu's given name portion of his shikona, Akinori, which can be translated as Brilliant Virtue, but its connection to Asashoryu himself stems more from the same kanji being the name of his high school, Meitoku (an alternate reading of Akinori) Gijuku High School. With a lot of shikona having connections either to the rikishi's heya and/or the rikishi's hometown, the closest Western equivalent I can think of would be the process by which Lenin's nom de guerre was inspired by the river Lena, with much more abstract connotations, rather than directly meaning anything in and of itself. It doesn't help that translating Chinese/Japanese to English is confounded with several issues, a little like with hieroglyphs: Kanji can be used both for their sound value and their meaning value. These two don't necessarily coincide. For instance, Baruto's shikona consists of kanji that are almost certainly entirely used for their sound value, whereas the kanji in shikona like Futeno are used primarily for its meaning value. Very few shikona are aptronyms in both meaning and sound, and this tends to be more for foreign rikishi like Sentoryu and Osunaarashi. In a particularly devilish twist of Japanese, kanji can actually be explicitly assigned a non-standard sound value essentially for stylistic purposes. The shikona Hayateumi is an example: standard pronunciation would have it pronounced something like Oiteumi (as it shares characters with Oitekaze stable), but it's instead pronounced as the word for "hurricane/gale" in Japanese, which has a different set of kanji altogether. More famously, Hokutoumi also changed the standard pronunciation of the kanji for "win" (usually "sho"/"katsu") to "to" as a means of including the name of his hometown in totality (the first half as sound, the second half as kanji). In a more codified form, some kanji when paired together may also take standardised but non-obvious meanings that are metaphorical or allusions: the -asuka portion of Tamaasuka is an example. The -asuka portion is written with characters that mean "flying bird" and could be pronounced "hitori", but the kanji are codified as being pronounced as "asuka" in a practice dating from the eponymous Asuka period in Japanese history. So the translations are for the most part fan-generated trivia in and of themselves - interesting pieces of information given some relevance only because we are mostly external to the Japanese context in which they occur and hence have another cultural base to refer to. I know there have been a couple of shikona-oriented threads in the past in this subforum, but having glanced through them quickly I think we are very justified in saying that this list of 300 or so (including older rikishi) is the most extensive yet. Also, if there are any sekitori shikona that you would like a translation for but which isn't in the list, do drop a reply and I'll try to get to it. No promises as to when, though. (Toriteki shikona are preferably avoided because a lot more actual Japanese family names tend to be in there, which makes it a lot less meaningful.) Contents: Shikona A-C Shikona D-H Shikona I-K Shikona M-S Shikona T-Z Asojima's Kanji/Shikona Notes Changelog: 10 Aug 2021: Created. 11 December 2021: Introduced new format with explainer on annotations and traditional Hepburn romanisation. 14 December 2021: Asojima's archive uploaded
  12. 16 points
    John (Gunning) asked us to create an account here and post sumo related ISJ stuff that we don't see on Sumo Forum while he is away. It doesn't look like there is anything we know that you guys don't but just doing what the boss requested. Hello anyway.
  13. 16 points
    My observations: Ura, until today, continues his conservative and mostly boring sumo (since returning to Makuuchi) in attempts to avoid injury. Starts very far from the shikirisen, causing an illusion that all his bouts are matta. Today just happened, as he himself said. See him going the conservative way again tomorrow. Kiribayama- having a great basho, but I don't see him ever reaching higher than Sekiwake. His recent success is a result of Kakuryuu's coaching. Looking very good this basho, but we have yet to see if it's a fluke or the beginning of something bigger. Too early to call him the new Harumafuji, for sure. Terunofuji - sure. Houshouryuu - letting success rise to his short-fused head. Makekoshi and hopefully humble pie. The potential screams, but so does the self destruction mode. Tonsillitis, huh? Meisei - joi elevator Ichinojou will have good and bad days till he retires, Sekiwake and some M8 there as well. Forget about using his shikona and breakthrough basho in the same breath. World Champion in synchronized walking backwards. Shoudai- nothing a good shrink can't fix. You can all laugh and degrade him as much as you like. Eventual Yokozuna. The only problem he has is mental, and it's a serious one. His self confidence is non-existent. In every interview, a question is answered with a question. "How are you doing?" "I'm moving well, I think, right? Aren't I?" I do not exaggerate. He needs a good coacher or a better shrink to help him overcome that and turn him into a mean machine at 30. He has the power, he has the magic technique- he lacks the belief in himself. Takakeishou- first few days he was simply scared. That happens a lot after an injury. After seeing that he can cope, he's showing his stuff. One-dimensional as usual, but so what? The first time he gets a shot of pain in a bout ("I felt electricity shoot through my body.."), he'll return to being too careful. Hopefully without those spasms which nobody mentions these days. Takayasu - Kisenosato's departure has done him more damage than he cares to admit. The training against him was gold. He has nobody serious to train with. And a bad back. I think his 1-4 is a combination of both, except his win which was really good. I mean, the graceful way he mounted the dohyo to get that freebie.. Mitakeumi - I have no idea. I dare anyone to have an idea about this enigma. No idea. Tochinoshin - The last year or so all his bashos seem to be his last, yet he somehow perseveres. Kaisei and Aoiyama - They're the same guy, but Kaisei is ranked lower most of the time. Their fighting style is totally different, but they're the same guy. They get excellent wins out of nowhere, and then lose too easily. Abi - Can't wait for his return.
  14. 16 points
    Here you go. It's rough, but here's the gist. Source ―― How do you feel one day after the yusho? “The severity of yesterday is gone. Today is a wonderful day. The best.” ―― What kind of basho was this for you? “In my sumo life up to now a lot has happened. 44 yushos and the accompanying memories. The value of this yusho is right up at the top.” ―― Why is this one at the top in terms of memories? ”Because my sumo career was on the line.” ―― Zensho yusho in the basho in which your sumo career was on the line. ”Yes, it’s unbelievable, isn’t it.” ―― Did your feelings change during the 15 days? ”Yes. Physically and mentally, my body gradually grew larger.” ―― Were you concerned in the early going? ”Yes. Not having any losses in the early matches was big.” ―― Was your concern the reason for your facial expression after your day-one win? ”It was an expression of ‘hey, I can do this.’” ―― At what point did you feel like you found something to carry you through? “I would say the first day. For example, to understand it easily, think of a left-handed batter batting righty. Or a right-handed golfer swing lefty. It was big that I was able to win with that tachiai on day one. At times I’ve led with my right leg, but when I step in from my left leg, my right leg is the pivot, and in my mind I thought I couldn’t do that for 15 days.” ―― So you were worried about whether your step-in with your right leg would work? ”Well, leading up to the basho I was training with Sandanme. A right-handed batter switching to lefty. Can you do it? During the season. During the season. ” ――This is the first time you’ve fully expressed your spirit. ”Well, I was feeling that my back was up against the wall.” ―― Is this the most you ever went through the basho with thoughts of retirement? ”This basho, intai was close by, right next to me really. I pushed myself like never before.” ―― When did thoughts of intai disappear? “After I got katchikoshi. My 51st 8-straight-win start. Even after becoming Yokozuna, kachikoshi is still the first hurdle to clear. For me, 10 wins is kachikoshi for a Yokozuna, and 12 wins is double digit. So first 8 wins—kachikoshi. Then 10, then 12, and after I got to 12, I felt like I could aim for the yusho. ” ――Having produced the result, how are you thinking in terms of your future course of action? ”It’s not for me to decide. Whatever those around me decide, that’s what I’ll do.” (This Japanese here is unclear but I think what he really means is that he plans to continue if those around him want him to.) ――After the 15 days, how’s your right knee feeling now? ”Waking up today, it feels like there’s some fluid accumulation.” ――You were tied with Terunofuji after 14 days. “For 14 days I just looked down and mounted the dohyo when it was my turn because there’s pressure. Of course I (as Yokozuna) was always following. My experience having won 44 times came in handy. His (Teru’s) sumo was really stable. His movement has really become more precise compared to a few years ago." ―― Now that you’ve won your comeback yusho, what’s your next goal? “When I woke up this morning, for the first time in a while I had the nice feeling that today there was nothing to do. That I don’t have to go train. I don’t have to move my body. Don’t make me think about next time. I’m going to take my time to relax.” ―― Will it be a new feeling now that there will be two Yokozuna? “The sense of responsibility will go from 1 to 2, so it will make things a little easier.” ――What was your aim with your tachiai on day 14 against Shodai? “Well my knee wasn’t in good shape, and I felt there was a good chance I’d lose at tachiai. I decided on doing that tachai when I woke that morning. I didn’t realize I started so far back behind the line.” ―― For the Terunofuji match only you braced against your right left and led with your left. “It was unconscious. It was with my left? The first of the basho with my left? I was in the moment.” ――What was the thought behind the scream and winning fist pump after you won the yusho? “This was the first time intai had ever come so close to me. I felt I cleared that after 12 wins. Yusho was one more hurdle to clear. All that came out when I did so. 70% of the Japanese fans thought Terunofuji woulc win in terms of strength. Even for me, I hadn’t trained with him for years and it was the first bout with him for years, and I wasn’t sure how it would go.”
  15. 16 points
    Some more organized but still scattered thoughts on the Haku-hoopla, note that this is more about his post-bout flex and roar and not about elbows or slaps: 1. I was first attracted to sumo not because of the action of the sport itself, but because it upheld pro-social standards that I saw mocked in Western sports which shamelessly harbour crooks, punks, and abusers of women and children. I also liked the standards of dignity where the rikishi did not make ostentatious displays of wealth or pride. 2. Beyond being morally attractive, I also liked that the tamped-down nature of sumo etiquette meant that small transgressions on the part of the rikishi became much more meaningful and dramatic in contrast to, say, American football where everyone break dances after a first down and it's just empty vulgarity. In sumo a scowl, clenched fist, or omitted bow is an "ooh-ahh" moment. 3. Standards are subject to entropy, and that entropy has to be actively resisted. People might accept a 5% deviation from a standard, but someone has to bear the burden of being a killjoy and speaking out against even a 5% deviation because if they don't, then the new standard is 95%, and the wiggle room will reach down to 90%, and so on and so forth until the standard is erased. 3a. Does that mean the henka etc should be banned? No. In my opinion the tension between the platonic ideal of sumo and the real-world need to gut out wins makes sumo vibrate with energy. Like I alluded to at the top I'm just talking about pre-and-post-match conduct. 4. I was thrilled and instinctively "OK" with Hakuho's day 15 performance because of what I brought up in point 2. It was an awesome sight because it occurred in contrast to a sumo world populated by stoic and emotionally-regulated rikishi. The contrast between his behaviour and the normal standards of behaviour matched the contrast (in my opinion) between his accomplishment and the expected fate of a veteran in decline. The old lion was raging against the dying of the light. 5. Nonetheless, if Hakuho's behaviour is not objected to, that's one small step toward a sumo world where guys are jumping up and down when they get a KK, or making it rain when they get a wad of kenshos. As noted in point 3, small steps add up. If behavioural standards are permitted to wear down, what's to say other standards won't slip to the point where we see corporate logos on the dohyo and "this bow-twirling brought to you by McDonalds" messages? 6. Ultimately, sumo holds on because people recognize that it is *prior to* any wrestler or elder, with its own nature and standards, and those who join it are not entitled to alter it or abuse it. Therefore, I'll go with my brain over my heart and say that Hakuho should have kept it in his mawashi, so to speak. 7. I still love him.
  16. 15 points
    Tonight I had to work. And you?
  17. 15 points
    People alleging “ugly sumo”…I dunno. Abema just rolled through replays of all his victories and there were some very colorful, dramatic, and technically skilled finishes among them. A couple of instances of brute power prevailing, a couple of lucky ones. He had it all. Today versus Terunofuji, I thought was the perfect bout under the circumstances. No one slipped, no boring yorikiri or hitakikomi, the harite exchange, they got on the belt, it went long, that awesome stare down as a lead up. I mean, what the heck do people want before they’re satisfied? As for alleging poor sportsmanship for the celebration….whatever. Look at those numbers, will ya?
  18. 15 points
    To necro something from yesterday, this is how Gaga looks now (tweet courtesy of Abema). The tweet also mentions that he has gone from 220kg to 155kg with a successful diet.
  19. 14 points
    He planned on announcing his retirement after Nagoya, but the Kyokai were all "why retire after a zensho, you still have it" etc. He spoke with his family and decided to continue. Then came the Corona Miyagino detention. He saw it as a blessing, planning to use the extra down time to heal his injured right knee. It turns out the knee has not healed as he had planned. So he decided to retire. An official Kyokai announcement is expected within a few days. As an aside, and not surprisingly, the Kyokai finds itself in a serious bind. One Yokozuna left, so there is one Yokozuna left.. This Yokozuna, as strong as he may be, is working on borrowed time, as we say in Corsica. One misstep, one wrong fall, and the delicate knees are in danger. The way I feel, every time he mounts the dohyo can be the last. And the current crop of kadoban yes kadoban no Ozeki are in no way immediate candidates for Yokozuna. We may find ourselves with no yokozuna and one Ozeki come March. OK, one Yokozuna and one Ozeki, and it's not like we even have real Ozeki contenders with the erratic lot of late, starting with Mitakeumi and culminating with Takayasu with the up and coming youngsters far from making a serious impression record-wise. We shall see.
  20. 14 points
  21. 14 points
    And with that, he retires with three more wins in Ozumo than most of the folks on this forum have.
  22. 14 points
    I interrupt your unseasonal dose of fandom wars to bring you the transcript of Hakuho's winner's interview (as requested by @Benihana): https://www.asahi.com/articles/ASP7L6JFSP7LUTQP01V.html Q: You've come back with a zensho yusho. A: Yes, it's the best. Q: You had an intense battle with Terunofuji. How did you feel about it? A: I didn't pay attention to thoughts that "my right knee wasn't good". I just gave my all. Q: What did you think when you won? A: Before the basho, I didn't think I could win with a zensho yusho. I'm really relieved. Q: Your family is here? (@Eikokurai: May be relevant to your last post) A: My four-year-old daughter just knew that her father was a sumo wrestler, but actually got to see it in action in good shape. I hope she remembers this. Q: What about your right knee surgery in March? A: I was wondering about the surgery. I thought I would never be able to mount the dohyo again. Q: What are your aims after this? A: This was my 899th win as a yokozuna. After 1 more I will be at 900. With the aim of [that] one win I will give my best. Q: [Your thoughts on] 15 days of a "do or die" basho. A: I went forward with the aim of gambarising for the Tokyo Olympics. Now we're here, and I could fulfil my promise to my father. It was a grave matter. I think it was good to have an aim like that. Q: What is the state of your knee? A: It fought for 15 days. If I couldn't have stepped up [to the dohyo] by myself, I would have always have had regrets till the very end. Thinking about various other things instead, I could step on the dohyo and achieve a zensho. Q: Was there a realisation to end it here? A: Let's not talk about that. Let me rest. Q: What about Terunofuji? A: For the 15 days, he was the only one who fought with that intensity. There was truly a sense of stability, and it was completely different from the Terunofuji who stood on the dohyo three years ago. Q: Is there a difference compared to previous championships? A: All my goals, dreams motivations, and records inspired me. Taiho said he lost his ambition after winning 32 times. I found meaning in that no one had won a yusho after 6 basho off. I set another record, and that is good.
  23. 14 points
    Olympic Opening Ceremony Details leaked from NHK secret source! After the athletes march into the stadium and take their widely-spaced seats, 2500 volunteers will dress up and combine to simulate Coronavirus cells and randomly bounce around the playing field until a new group enters from the north end in the shape of a face mask. The Coronavirus cells will attempt to break through the mask and fail, then they will attempt to mutate into a new form and some may succeed. At that point, another new group will emerge from the south end of the stadium in the shape of a giant syringe. This will cause the cells to fall face up and after a few minutes, but not synchronized, they will turn face down, where the backs of their clothing is the same colour as the stadium floor. They will move around largely unseen, then flip back over again in formation, spelling out anti-covid messages in all the languages of the world for way longer than necessary. Then they will make a large circle while the syringe morphs into a pair of wooden sticks, all the while as the centre circle is raised one meter and the cover removed to reveal, a (round) dohyo! The loudest hyoushi-gi sound in history will then be heard throughout most of Tokyo, and the yokozuna and the rest of his party will appear. This will be the cue for great hilarity in every country in the world for sumo fans, as their local broadcast team attempts to explain the ceremony, stacking poor translations onto non-facts and adding in nonsensical comments, resulting in the longest off-basho thread here ever as we all trade the inanity. The ceremony is flawless, unlike the description of it. :)
  24. 14 points
    Takakeisho seems to have suffered from some sort of freak accident/incident that doesn't seem to be his opponent's fault. There's nothing much to say about it unless there's an announcement about his condition. In fact, contrary to any question of fault, the only thing that can be said about Takakeisho's bout is that he was lucky his opponent was alert. Ichinojo seemed to have realised something was not right and positively almost helped him down to the dohyo surface once the bout was over. If sumo had a sporting award, Ichinojo's certainly one of the front runners for this basho.
  25. 14 points
    Chiyonokuni is very interesting with his almost unmatched fury on dohyo. Too bad he has been so much injured. He never gives up and always puts his limbs in jeopardy with his tenacious Tawara dances and to the end-principle even in almost impossible situations. Ichiyamamoto looks weaker Tsurugisho-Ishiura was a good example how strong rikishi are. Ishiura is all muscle and weighs more than 99% of people and yet Tsurugisho is able to lift him upwards even without any effective grip. Tokushoryu has some subcutaneous fat deposits like hardened fat tissue of lipomas but he surely did his tottari beautifully. Of course it was the flow of the bout but such tottari always brings joy joy feelings to some (me at least). Good tottari is like perfect sneeze which clears nostrils perfectly without leaving any strechy slime hanging. Chiyoo has good shoulder muscularity and great character based on that post-bout interview where he said more content wise than some rikishi do during their whole career and was happy as Maradona when he scored against Greece. Ura can rely a lot on his knee(s) now as he doesn’t avoid much twists anymore compared to 6 months ago. Exemplary rikishi with such history of two operations and slowish recovery sensation wise. Good to see him in makuuchi. It may be quite probable that his career will end in another knee injury in some point but for now he brings in excitement and fighting spirit. Seemed to be quite close loss to Chiyoo. Tochinoshin hasn’t lost just knee stability but also some of his general power for some reason. Some bouts he loses clearly because of the knee problem but some he loses despite knee being in relatively safe position. Shimanoumi is thick overall. Not dumb, I think thick is sometimes used when calling someone dumb in English. In my native language, thick is just thick, not dumb. Well he is thick body wise. From neck to toes. He is really solid and also does this tight package sumo always moving as a block and trying to maintain his body close together. Bit like Daishomaru in many ways but more stoic. He has also bloomed at more mature age and kind of flew under the radar in his path to makuuchi. He even challenges well some really strong rikishi. Today he did his own sumo against Terutsuyoshi and used his dashinage at the end. Dashinage also suits him as that is often done from this very stable and tight stance. I like Shimanoumi. He is the embodiment of classic all around thick rikishi with simple but beautiful sumo. Tamawashi faded away at some point and became a rikishi anyone can beat in makuuchi. When he is able to his own sumo, he still possesses enormous power and he used to have strongest grip in sumo which is kind of strange considering his usual sumo style. Now Shoudai and Terunofuji have strongest grips. Chiyoshoma is sometimes manhandled in brutal ways but today some great mobiity, reacting to Aoiyama¨s moves, winning every small battles within the bout and finishing with burly uwatenage. One of the best bouts from him this year. Great stuff. I have a cramp in forearm extensor muscle due to deadlift so I refrain from further writing. Thank you for your attention, good will and please do understand that Hoshoryu is possibly the best rikishi in small fake moves before brilliantly timed throws.