Gurowake

Trivia bits

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I checked the 1-6 to 6-1 sequence in the database.  Not surprisingly, easier to do: 558 since 1960.  Then I checked for rikishi with highest rank Juryo-and-above: 29, including Henry (Sentoryu) Miller. 

Some performed this feat on their way up, some on the way down.  Unless I missed someone (easy to do!) only one man ended up in Sanyaku: Daitetsu at K1W (though the DB lists his top rank as J12).

The only active rikishi from this subgroup: Sagatsukasa in 2016.11 and 2017.01

 

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On ‎12‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 21:56, Yamanashi said:

Unless I missed someone (easy to do!) only one man ended up in Sanyaku: Daitetsu at K1W (though the DB lists his top rank as J12).

 

 

That isn't an error. The DB shows highest rank to date in these kind of queries, not highest ever rank. At the time of Daitetsu's 1-6 to 6-1 sequence (September to November 1981) his highest rank was indeed J12 (back in January 1980).

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2 minutes ago, ryafuji said:

That isn't an error. The DB shows highest rank to date in these kind of queries, not highest ever rank. At the time of Daitetsu's 1-6 to 6-1 sequence (September to November 1981) his highest rank was indeed J12 (back in January 1980).

Interesting.  I checked "highest rank" in the DB, but also checked (manually) anybody at M or above.  So maybe I missed some others.  Unfortunately, I can't find the Excel file now ...

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19 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Eyeballing the list, there's also Yakigaya (Wakakoyu) who later made sanyaku.

Unfortunately, I haven't been following sumo for awhile, so I don't catch some obvious names.  I am currently going through the 550 names one at a time to check for career highest rank.  Then I will be able to tell how many rikishi achieved this feat on the way up vs. on the way down.

Preliminary research has found another Komusubi, Wakajishi, and an Ozeki, Kaiketsu. In addition, at least two rikishi have pulled off the 1-6 to 6-1 trick twice.

Ganbarou, or whatever.

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OK, I gambarized and went through the DB for all 1-6 to 6-1 sequences (incidentally, there were some 1-7 to 7-1 runs in the 40's and 50's!).

516 rikishi with 558 events; 5 men did it three times.

You can't get a 1-6 or a 6-1 above Makushita, so most of these rikishi never saw makuuchi.

79% of the cases were performed "on the way up" (prior to the rikishi reaching his highest rank).

No future Yokozuna ever performed this feat, but the following makuuchi did:

Ozeki: Hokutenyu, Kaiketsu

Sekiwake: Kaiki, Wakashoyo

Komusubi: Wakakoyu (twice), Wakajishi, Daitetsu

M1: Kotobeppu, Ryuo

M2: Shotenro (thrice!), Kitataiki, Saisu

M3: Kototsubaki, Daishi

M6: Wakanojo, Kinkaiyama

M8: Tamarikido, Tamaairiki

M9: Kobo, Sagatsukasa

M11: Daigo, Tochinofuji (thrice!)

M12: Senyoryu, Takanomine, Takanoyama, Yoshiazuma

M13: Maruyama

M16: Akiseyama

(My apologies in advance for typos.)

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Something truly trivial...longest streaks of back and forth division changes. Listed are the start and end division, and the first basho of the streak. Active rikishi and ongoing streaks in red. Cutoff 1930, i.e. modern era but without the weird banzuke-making of the first few years.

between sanyaku and maegashira:
 8 Dewanohana    M  -> M   1985.11
 6 Mitsuneyama   Sy -> Sy  1948.10
 6 Annenyama     M  -> M   1958.03
 6 Ozutsu (2)    M  -> M   1983.01
 6 Shohozan      M  -> M   2013.05
 5 Chiyonoyama   M  -> Sy  1946.11
 5 Hasegawa (1)  M  -> Sy  1970.07
 5 Hasegawa (2)  Sy -> M   1974.01
 5 Ozutsu (1)    Sy -> M   1981.07
 5 Asahifuji     M  -> Sy  1984.07
 5 Kotogaume     M  -> Sy  1985.09
 5 Tosanoumi     Sy -> M   2003.05
 5 Wakanosato    Sy -> M   2005.01

between makuuchi and juryo:
 7 Wakashoyo     J  -> M   1991.07
 6 Oshio         J  -> J   1971.07
 6 Hakuryuyama   J  -> J   1981.07
 6 Masurao       J  -> J   1985.07
 6 Hananokuni    J  -> J   1992.01
 6 Tochinonada   M  -> M   2009.09
 5 Maenoyama     J  -> M   1956.09
 5 Wakanokuni    J  -> M   1967.07
 5 Taniarashi    J  -> M   1978.03
 5 Amanoyama     J  -> M   1983.05
 5 Kitakachidoki M  -> J   1989.07
 5 Kinkaiyama    J  -> M   1999.07
 5 Asanowaka     J  -> M   2001.11
 5 Toyozakura    J  -> M   2003.09
 5 Koryu         J  -> M   2009.11
 5 Takarafuji    J  -> M   2011.05
 5 Ikioi         J  -> M   2012.01
 5 Yutakayama    J  -> M   2017.03

between juryo and makushita:
 7 Shinobuyama   Ms -> J   1947.06
 7 Sanofuji      J  -> Ms  1983.03
 6 Tochifudo     Ms -> Ms  2003.07
 6 Asofuji       J  -> J   2008.01
 5 Kamuiyama     Ms -> J   1933.05
 5 Kozuzan       Ms -> J   1940.01
 5 Kainoyama     Ms -> J   1948.10
 5 Yamato        Ms -> J   1995.01
 5 Takanoyama    J  -> Ms  2013.09
 5 Sakigake      Ms -> J   2013.11

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And for the lower divisions:

between makushita and sandanme:
13 Kotomikasa    Ms -> Sd  1983.03
10 Dewayu        Sd -> Sd  1974.07
 9 Shimada       Sd -> Ms  1978.09
 9 Shoryu        Ms -> Sd  1979.01
 9 Tsushimanada  Sd -> Ms  1992.03
 9 Okoryu        Sd -> Ms  2016.07
 8 Buyuzan       Sd -> Sd  1937.05
 8 Taninooto     Sd -> Sd  1981.03
 8 Kiyotakara    Sd -> Sd  1988.11
 8 Kaisei        Sd -> Sd  1996.05
 8 Kotokusuwaka  Sd -> Sd  1997.05
 8 Kiyoazuma     Sd -> Sd  2003.01
 8 Meisei        Ms -> Ms  2013.03
 8 Kotofukujuno  Ms -> Ms  2016.03

between sandanme and jonidan:
11 Yoshida       Sd -> Jd  1986.05
10 Yuzawa        Jd -> Jd  2008.09
10 Mutsukaze     Jd -> Jd  2012.05
 9 Tengozan      Jd -> Sd  1972.01
 9 Maishinzan    Jd -> Sd  1986.09
 9 Oshiro        Sd -> Jd  1988.11
 9 Hashinomoto   Jd -> Sd  1999.05
 9 Takashoma     Jd -> Sd  2001.01
 9 Kototaiki     Sd -> Jd  2013.07
 9 Minatoryu     Jd -> Sd  2014.09
 8 Kotohitachi   Jd -> Jd  1978.09
 8 Shioryu       Jd -> Jd  1980.05
 8 Motoki        Sd -> Sd  1985.07
 8 Oazuma        Jd -> Jd  2000.03
 8 Tamahoriki    Jd -> Jd  2002.07
 8 Jiguruma      Sd -> Sd  2007.03
 8 Tokiarashi    Jd -> Jd  2011.05
 8 Higonoryu     Sd -> Sd  2013.07
 8 Ryutsukasa    Sd -> Sd  2015.11

between jonidan and jonokuchi:
11 Hayate        Jk -> Jd  1988.11
11 Aoto          Jk -> Jd  1992.11
11 Suenaga       Jk -> Jd  1999.11
10 Ikuta         Jk -> Jk  1985.03
 9 Kozakura      Jk -> Jd  1982.11
 9 Endo          Jk -> Jd  1988.07
 9 Fusahikari    Jk -> Jd  2001.07
 9 Chichii       Jk -> Jd  2002.11
 8 Tanimura      Jk -> Jk  1988.11
 8 Anseiryu      Jk -> Jk  1994.07
 8 Minozakura    Jk -> Jk  1995.07
 8 Daisuruga     Jd -> Jd  1998.01
 8 Kawai         Jk -> Jk  2003.07

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1 hour ago, Asashosakari said:

between makushita and sandanme:

Holy Moley!  I thought you were simply tracking moves from one division to another, but when I looked at Kotomiksa's record, I realized that you're looking at consecutive changes from one basho to the next!

Maybe you can keep track of the current rikishi to see how many changes they rack up.  My suggestion for a name is "Churn watch".

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Not sure if this is the right thread...

This query doesn't include Enho but I don't know why. Can someone spot the error?

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8 minutes ago, Tenshinhan said:

This query doesn't include Enho but I don't know why. Can someone spot the error?

The KK and MK shorthand notations don't work in the query when those zero-values aren't present.

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For db newcomers - be careful about querying the low level divisions from decades ago. The information is incomplete and just because it doesn't show up doesn't mean it didn't happen.

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Also, I know Kyokutenho was bouncing back-and-forth between the joi and the rest of Makuuchi for a long time.  This is obviously difficult to research because it is not rank-specific.

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Does anyone happen to have the full list of rikishi who have earned at least 4 kinboshi? I ask because this basho Hokutofuji can earn a kinboshi in his 4th straight tournament, and I'm curious as to whether anyone has kinboshi'd in more than 4 consecutive tournaments, and whether anyone other than Tosanoumi has matched that.

Hokutofuji can also earn kinboshi in the 4th of 4 tournaments he's faced yokozuna, and I'd like to know what the current record is for a 100 percent kinboshi record.

Edited by Katooshu

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6 minutes ago, Katooshu said:

Does anyone happen to have the full list of rikishi who have earned at least 4 kinboshi? I ask because this basho Hokutofuji can earn a kinboshi in his 4th straight tournament, and I'm curious as to whether anyone has kinboshi'd in more consecutive tournaments, and whether anyone other than Tosanoumi has matched it.

Hokutofuji can also earn kinboshi in the 4th of 4 tournaments he's faced yokozuna, and I'd like to know what the current record is for a 100 percent kinboshi record.

Here you go... 95 guys with 4+ official kinboshi. Godspeed.

Edited by McBugger
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Just now, Katooshu said:

Thank you :-D

I'll try to see if I can answer any of your other enquiries later today while procrastinating (unavoidable). If I'm going to be inefficient, at least I can be productive.

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4 hours ago, McBugger said:

Here you go... 95 guys with 4+ official kinboshi. Godspeed.

I did a study of Takamiyami once and came across a surprising statistic: he was 21-113 against Yokozunae, but 12 of those wins were against Wajima, including 7 of his 12 kinboshi.  I hope he remembered to send Wajima a nice fruit basket when he retired!

 

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5 hours ago, Katooshu said:

I ask because this basho Hokutofuji can earn a kinboshi in his 4th straight tournament, and I'm curious as to whether anyone has kinboshi'd in more than 4 consecutive tournaments, and whether anyone other than Tosanoumi has matched that.


Tosanoumi is the only one at four consecutive basho. 16 more managed three in a row, the last one before Hokutofuji was Kotonishiki in 1999.
 

Rikishi			Basho	Span

Tosanoumi		4	1998 Kyushu - 1999 Natsu
Yamanishiki		3	1930 Natsu - 1931 Hatsu
Tatekabuto		3	1940 Natsu - 1941 Natsu
Wakanohana Katsuji	3	1953 Hatsu - 1953 Natsu
Kotonishiki Noboru	3	1953 Natsu - 1954 Hatsu
Kotogahama		3	1955 Hatsu - 1955 Natsu
Narutoumi		3	1956 Natsu - 1957 Hatsu
Kiyokuni		3	1964 Aki - 1965 Hatsu
Daigo			3	1964 Kyushu - 1965 Haru
Kirinji Takayoshi	3	1966 Natsu - 1966 Aki
Fukunohana		3	1970 Natsu - 1970 Aki
Kurohimeyama		3	1978 Kyushu - 1979 Haru
Tochiakagi		3	1981 Aki - 1982 Hatsu
Tochinonada		3	1998 Natsu - 1998 Aki
Tamakasuga		3	1998 Aki - 1999 Hatsu
Kotonishiki Katsuhiro	3	1999 Haru - 1999 Nagoya
Hokutofuji		3	2017 Nagoya - 2017 Kyushu


Also, note that the database query result includes fusen bouts which skews the numbers. Kyokutenho for instance has two kinboshi, not four as shown in the summary.

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Makushita Banzuke
Result East High Rank West High Result
  Yago J13 Ms1 Terutsuyoshi J9  
  Asabenkei J7 Ms2 Shimanoumi J14  
  Kitataiki M2 Ms3 Tobizaru J14  
  Kitaharima M15 Ms4 Akiseyama M16  
  Toyonoshima S Ms5 Jokoryu K  

If I didn't screw up the data processing, then Hatsu 2018 is the very first basho in history* in which all 10 rikishi ranked Ms1 to Ms5 have been sekitori before. (Shame about Kitataiki's retirement messing with the occasion a bit.)

* History being the DB's full-banzuke coverage period since Natsu 1934, but it's unlikely that it happened at any point before.


The only post-1934 example at the opposite end of the spectrum - nobody with sekitori experience - apparently happened in Natsu 1969:

Makushita Banzuke
Result East High Rank West High Result
2-5 Oshio Ms1 Ms1 Kasugaryu Ms1 3-4
5-2  Manazuru Ms2 Ms2 Masuiyama Ms2 6-1 
3-4 Kitaseumi Ms3 Ms3 Fukumoto Ms3 3-4
5-2 Teruzakura Ms4 Ms4 Hagiyama Ms2 4-3
2-5 Terukami# Ms1 Ms5 Nishimori Ms3 1-6


If anybody's wondering about the trend, the average number of ex-sekitori has been:

1930s: 5.1
1940s: 4.0
1950s: 3.5
1960s: 3.9
1970s: 4.4
1980s: 4.9
1990s: 5.0
2000s: 5.3
2010s: 5.3

Edited by Asashosakari
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5 hours ago, Asashosakari said:
Makushita Banzuke
Result East High Rank West High Result
  Yago J13 Ms1 Terutsuyoshi J9  
  Asabenkei J7 Ms2 Shimanoumi J14  
  Kitataiki M2 Ms3 Tobizaru J14  
  Kitaharima M15 Ms4 Akiseyama M16  
  Toyonoshima S Ms5 Jokoryu K  

If I didn't screw up the data processing, then Hatsu 2018 is the very first basho in history* in which all 10 rikishi ranked Ms1 to Ms5 have been sekitori before. (Shame about Kitataiki's retirement messing with the occasion a bit.)

 

I noticed this myself when looking at the Juryo Game entry form.  I didn't realize that it never happened before though, or that it was anything special; I would have thought it to happen at least occasionally in the past. 

On similar notes, the only two in this range without sekitori experience on the previous banzuke got promoted, and both Ms6s were former sekitori as well.  There was only Mitoryu at a high rank in the top 20 Makushita rikishi.

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12 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I noticed this myself when looking at the Juryo Game entry form.  I didn't realize that it never happened before though, or that it was anything special; I would have thought it to happen at least occasionally in the past. 

Yeah, I was surprised as well.

Some more data... There have been 422 basho between 1934.05 and 2018.01. Excluding the five tournaments that had more than 10 rikishi at Ms1-Ms5 (four of them after WWII when returning rikishi were re-inserted in the banzuke, and Hatsu 1983 with a kosho rikishi), the sekitori counts happened this often:

10 - 1
9 - 4 (1966.11, 1967.05, 1995.03, 2000.09)
8 - 15 (most recently 2017.11)
7 - 36 (...2017.09)
6 - 81 (...2015.09)
5 - 87 (...2017.01)
4 - 77 (...2016.09)
3 - 67 (...2014.05)
2 - 41 (...2010.07)
1 - 7 (1955.09, 1957.09, 1958.09, 1962.01, 1962.03, 1962.11, 1963.01)
0 - 1

It's most surprising that the full 10 didn't happen in 1967.05, which was the basho after 16 sekitori spots were eliminated and huge numbers of juryo rikishi found themselves demoted to makushita, and all KK rikishi in upper makushita received demotions due to lack of space. The only Ms top 5 guy who didn't have juryo experience in 1967.05, Tochifuji, had gone 6-1 at Ms1e and was dropped to Ms3e.

Edited by Asashosakari

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I really wonder at that decision to eliminate that many sekitori spots all at once.  Couldn't they have done it gradually over the next couple years?  Were they that hard up for money that it had to be RIGHT NOW? 

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