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If I'm not mistaken, Yamaguchi has become the first rikishi in over 50 years to get straight kachikoshi for two full years / 12 basho, without being a current or later ozeki/yokozuna (presumably) or a rookie. The most recent one to do it was later komusubi Haguroiwa (1964.11 to 1966.11, from Ms35e to his makuuchi debut).

Edited by Asashosakari
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Latest rikishi to reach kachikoshi from...

0-7: Tochinishiki, Haru 1951, only one to achieve it
0-6: Tochinonada, Haru 2008, 13 cases altogether (including the one above), all 8-7's
0-5: Yoshikaze, Natsu 2012 (8-7), 53 cases altogether (including the 13 above), 43x 8-7 and 10x 9-6 (latest: Tokitenku, Kyushu 2006)


Latest rikishi to go makekoshi from...

7-0: never
6-0: Dejima, Kyushu 2008 (6-9), 4 cases altogether, 2 of them via kyujo (fourth case: Oga, Nagoya 2006, also 6-9)
5-0: Takarafuji, Haru 2017 (7-8), 40 cases altogether (including the 4 above), 13 of them via kyujo, 17x 7-8, 5x 6-9 (latest: Dejima above), 5x 5-10 (latest: Aoiyama, Natsu 2013)


15-day tournaments only, but including those staged 1939-1944.
 

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When looking at some of the rikishi profiles on Sumo Reference, I realized that both Kizenryu and Higonojo have pretty good records for their final bouts when standing at 3-3: Higonojo managed kachi koshi 19 times (only falling to 3-4 five times), while Kizenryu's record is 9-2. I have not figured out how to do a search on this, but possibly someone can help: Who are the lower division rikishi with the strongest nerves?

 

 

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Yokozuna who have won their debut, only 4 in 15 bout era including Kisenosato. The lowest Yusho count being 4 at intai:

Tachiyama

Tochigiyama

Futabayama

Azumafuji

Taiho

Takanosato

Takanohana

Kisenosato

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12 hours ago, Flohru said:

When looking at some of the rikishi profiles on Sumo Reference, I realized that both Kizenryu and Higonojo have pretty good records for their final bouts when standing at 3-3: Higonojo managed kachi koshi 19 times (only falling to 3-4 five times), while Kizenryu's record is 9-2. I have not figured out how to do a search on this, but possibly someone can help: Who are the lower division rikishi with the strongest nerves?

 

 

This is not exactly what you were asking for, but almost. I looked at all lower division rikishi who were at 3-3 after day 12.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?group_by=rikishi1&year=1960.07-now&day=13-15&ms=on&sd=on&jd=on&jk=on&shikona_changes1=on&wins1=3&winsopt1=1&offset=1450&show_form=1

I only checked for rikishi with 10 or more bashos on the bubble. 

If you look at differences, here are the top 5 (sorry for the formatting):

1. Kotokuni 27-10 (+17)

2. Higonojo 18-3 (+15)

3. Bungonishiki 22-8 (+14)

4. Higo 25-11 (+14)

5. Kaorufuji 25-12 (+13)

 

The leaders in percentages

1. Sagatsukasa 10-1 (90.9%)

2. Takamifuji 9-1 (90%)

3. Dewanoshin 13-2 (86.7%)

4. Owakamatsu 12-2 (85.7%)

5. Higonojo 18-3 (85.7%)

 

And here are the lists for the biggest lower-division chokers:

1. Hisatsukasa 9-27 (-18)

2. Hokutoryu 19-34 (-15)

3. Takashoma 17-31 (-14)

4. Kasachikara 15-29 (-14)

5. Wakabusho 7-10 (-13)

 

1. Daido, Kotomiura, Shigematsu, Tensetsu, Warabigawa 1-9 (10%)

 

Edit: listing the query by records I saw that one rikishi had a 0-8 record for the seventh bout, viz. Kotoryusei (who is still active)

 

Edited by Randomitsuki
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22 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

If I'm not mistaken, Yamaguchi has become the first rikishi in over 50 years to get straight kachikoshi for two full years / 12 basho, without being a current or later ozeki/yokozuna (presumably) or a rookie. The most recent one to do it was later komusubi Haguroiwa (1964.11 to 1966.11, from Ms35e to his makuuchi debut).

And now you jinxed him and he can never fullfill his dream. :'-(

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On 26.3.2017 at 23:28, Randomitsuki said:

This is not exactly what you were asking for, but almost. I looked at all lower division rikishi who were at 3-3 after day 12.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?group_by=rikishi1&year=1960.07-now&day=13-15&ms=on&sd=on&jd=on&jk=on&shikona_changes1=on&wins1=3&winsopt1=1&offset=1450&show_form=1

I only checked for rikishi with 10 or more bashos on the bubble. 

If you look at differences, here are the top 5 (sorry for the formatting):

1. Kotokuni 27-10 (+17)

2. Higonojo 18-3 (+15)

3. Bungonishiki 22-8 (+14)

4. Higo 25-11 (+14)

5. Kaorufuji 25-12 (+13)

...

 

Thanks, that's pretty helpful! Looking at Higonojo's record manually once more, I still count five basho (2011.01; 2012.03; 2013.03; 2014.07; 2015.01) in which he fell to make-koshi from 3-3, so I guess your search is not 100 % accurate. Well in one of those basho, 2012.03, his final bout already was on day 12 so that will be the reason in that case. Anyway, it is pretty obvious that he became a sekitori mainly due to his strong nerves.

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Toyohibiki has won his second multiple-playoff juryo yusho after finishing on 10-5. The first was back in January 2007 when he emerged victorious after a four-way playoff. Masurao (with a record five juryo yusho) is the only other to have two 10-5s. There is one example of a 9-6 (!!) yusho - Buyuzan in March 2001 (that was a eight-way). Sadly no 8-7 yushos yet....

 

Edited by ryafuji
oops, 2007

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1 hour ago, ryafuji said:

Toyohibiki has won his second multiple-playoff juryo yusho after finishing on 10-5.

Also becoming only the 11th rikishi to feature in juryo playoffs at least 3 times.

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2 hours ago, ryafuji said:

The first was back in January 2017 when he emerged victorious after a four-way playoff.

*cough*

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6 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:
2 hours ago, ryafuji said:

The first was back in January 2017 when he emerged victorious after a four-way playoff.

*cough*

Ahh, back in the good old days. I remember it well.

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28 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

*cough*

Corrected, thanks :-)

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After ozeki yusho, least basho to sekiwake or intai:

 2 Masuiyama    1949.05 -> 1950.01  intai
 3 Toyokuni     1930.01 -> 1930.10  intai
 3 Tochiazuma   2003.11 -> 2004.05  demotion (regained ozeki rank after one basho)
 5 Mitsuneyama  1954.03 -> 1955.05  demotion
 5 Baruto       2012.01 -> 2012.11  demotion
 6 Shimizugawa  1934.05 -> 1937.05  intai
 6 Kotoshogiku  2016.01 -> 2017.01  demotion
 7 Tochiazuma   2006.01 -> 2007.03  intai    (still on banzuke for 2007.05)
 8 Noshirogata  1928.03 -> 1930.03  demotion (regained ozeki rank after two basho)
10 Konishiki    1992.03 -> 1993.11  demotion
11 Kirishima    1991.01 -> 1992.11  demotion
12 Wakahaguro   1959.11 -> 1961.11  demotion
12 Takanonami   1997.11 -> 1999.11  demotion (regained ozeki rank after one basho)

Goeido will have the "opportunity" to join in 4th place with 4 basho.

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No one in the 6-basho era has defeated 4 different Yokozuna in a single basho.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&group_by=basho&group_by2=rikishi1&having=4&onlyw1=on&rank2=y

First two are pre-6-basho, most recent was one of four concurrent Yokozuna defeating the other 3 in regulation and then one of them again in a playoff.

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On a similar note, no one managed to defeat all 3 of the Yokozuna From Natsu 2014 until Kotoshogiku's Yusho Hatsu 2016 (of course, due to injuries, there were only 5 basho where it was reasonably possible for most).  Kisenosato then repeated that with his first Yusho.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&group_by=basho&group_by2=rikishi1&having=3&onlyw1=on&rank2=y

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While looking something up in the oyakata gallery, I happened to stumble upon the picture of Kent Brockman-oyakata (aka Minatogawa, moto-Daitetsu). I looked up his career table in the Doitsubase and somehow noticed that as a one-time Komusubi with a total of 31 Makuuchi basho he never once achieved a double-digit KK in the top division.

A little idle clicking later, I believe to have found the post-1958 top three.

Kitakachidoki   49

Minatofuji         46

Misugiiso          35

 

All of them are career Maegashira. Would be interesting to know if there are former Sekiwake and/or Komusubi who can top Daitetsu's 31. I cannot be arsed to figure that out manually.

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23 minutes ago, yorikiried by fate said:

 

Misugiiso          35

 

He's from the 1920's, I think.

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On 22.4.2017 at 23:15, yorikiried by fate said:

While looking something up in the oyakata gallery, I happened to stumble upon the picture of Kent Brockman-oyakata (aka Minatogawa, moto-Daitetsu). I looked up his career table in the Doitsubase and somehow noticed that as a one-time Komusubi with a total of 31 Makuuchi basho he never once achieved a double-digit KK in the top division.

A little idle clicking later, I believe to have found the post-1958 top three.

Kitakachidoki   49

Minatofuji         46

Misugiiso          35

All of them are career Maegashira. Would be interesting to know if there are former Sekiwake and/or Komusubi who can top Daitetsu's 31. I cannot be arsed to figure that out manually.

The hopefully complete list of 30+ basho guys (15-day era):

60 Kotoinazuma (K)
49 Kitakachidoki (M3)
47 Jingaku (K)
47 Kyokudozan (K)
46 Minatofuji (M2)
44 Hamanoshima (K)
35 Misugiiso (M2)
34 Kirinishiki (M2)
34 Jumonji (M6)
32 Asanosho (M2)
32 Wakanoyama (K)
31 Udagawa (M3)
31 Daitetsu (K)
30 Tamaryu (K)
30 Otsukasa (M4) - best result 8-7!

The longest-tenured sekiwake was Hayateumi with 22 basho. Kyokushuho is the active leader with 20.

A few interesting near-misses:

- Kurama had 61 single-digit results, with his only 10-5 setting up his komusubi and then sekiwake debuts
- Asanowaka's only 10-5 record didn't come until the 50th of his 52 makuuchi appearances, at age 34
- Tagaryu had 48 single-digit scores and only one that was better - which earned him a yusho
 

Edited by Asashosakari
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2 minutes ago, yorikiried by fate said:

Amazing autism work!

Posting took longer than compiling. ;-) Just a quick merge of this and this in Excel.

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3 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

The hopefully complete list of 30+ basho guys (15-day era):

60 Kotoinazuma (K)

One of those rank and file guys that I started to follow in Sumo World magazine. I became more of fan after looking at his career record. He fell to Juryo due to injury and managed to make Komusubi during the Futagoyama Taka/Waka era. I was also happy to see that he managed to secure a Kabu.

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21 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Posting took longer than compiling. ;-) Just a quick merge of this and this in Excel.

Clever. I'm always dwelling on the naive assumption that the queries cannot give proper information about careers. Really nice method.

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On 3/25/2017 at 06:58, PawnSums said:

due to hokutoryu's retirement (Sadgoodbyes...), Hanakaze has the longest career on record.

Yep, I was there on his last day. He won and got his kachi-koshi which was nice. Now Hanakaze is the only rikishi older than me in sumo; which is of course why I want him to continue indefinitely, even after he has to be carried onto the dohyo.  Heh.

 How many players in sports as physically demanding as sumo can say they have been active since 1986?! I realize there are factors that help to keep these active (being the only one who knows all the best chanko recipes etc), but it is still a spectacle how looooong you have to scroll down his record on the DB.

Edited by Asameshimae
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If I'm not mistaken (this always gets me in trouble):

This means that Hanakaze and Hokutoryu (before he retired) both broke the 30 year career record set from, wait for it, 1766 to 1796, by Miyagino Nishinosuke.  Whoa. That's something.

I know normally records from antiquity aren't comparable, but I think it is (largely) in this case.

Gokurosama to them both. And fight on Hanakaze.

Edited by Asameshimae

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