Kaninoyama

Kakuryu to Retire

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13 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

The error code given when I try the video on Chrome is 224003 which apparently means "Failed to play the associated resource because it is not supported by this browser. Equivalent to the HTML5 MEDIA_ERR_SRC_NOT_SUPPORTED mediaError.". It plays in Firefox, but I do need to click the start button twice, which I think means that FF errors on the first attempt as well and then falls back on a different video format (while Chrome fails with both).

Thanks, I'll do some investigating later so it'll work better in future videos. I didn't re-encode the video, just copied it from my online TV service, which I know does work in Chrome, so maybe there's something wrong with how I'm wrapping it in an .mp4 file. I don't know if it's falling back to a different video format in Firefox though because I believe there is none (the site creates an additional file after uploading but it seems to be the exact same as the original in my case).

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One of my fondest memories of Kakuryu was what he did after he won one of his Yusho several years ago.  After he stepped off the dohyo  and as he was walking in the rear area where all the photographers were and where he would get his hair redone, he spotted his wife in the crowd.  He suddenly stopped walking and ran over and gave her a warm kiss.  It was just momentary but it said a lot about the type of man and husband he is.  I was so surprised because he seems so reserved.  It was such an unguarded moment.  He didn't make a big deal out of it and it certainly wasn't to impress the press.  I was very touched by this gesture of love towards his wife.

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https://www.zakzak.co.jp/smp/spo/news/210325/spn2103250007-s1.html

The old Izutsu beya building was razed to the ground, but a construction notice for a multi dwelling unit with an attached sumo beya appeared at the end of last year, to be owned by Sakahoko's widow. Construction will start in April and last 12 months.

It seems like Kakuryu is on a fast track to rebuild Izutsu beya. The author speculated that Toyonoshima will grab one of the 70 year olds' kabu this coming May from outside his ichimon, and return the Izutsu kabu so that Kakuryu can open his heya.

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21 minutes ago, Kamitsuumi said:

https://www.zakzak.co.jp/smp/spo/news/210325/spn2103250007-s1.html

The old Izutsu beya building was razed to the ground, but a construction notice for a multi dwelling unit with an attached sumo beya appeared at the end of last year, to be owned by Sakahoko's widow. Construction will start in April and last 12 months.

It seems like Kakuryu is on a fast track to rebuild Izutsu beya. The author speculated that Toyonoshima will grab one of the 70 year olds' kabu this coming May from outside his ichimon, and return the Izutsu kabu so that Kakuryu can open his heya.

Sekitori retirement announcements are often tied to the negotiation and resolution of more than one planned kabu transaction.   The decline of a rikishi makes the news.  The completion of the kabu juggling makes the announcement.

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1 hour ago, Kamitsuumi said:

https://www.zakzak.co.jp/smp/spo/news/210325/spn2103250007-s1.html

The old Izutsu beya building was razed to the ground, but a construction notice for a multi dwelling unit with an attached sumo beya appeared at the end of last year, to be owned by Sakahoko's widow. Construction will start in April and last 12 months.

It seems like Kakuryu is on a fast track to rebuild Izutsu beya. The author speculated that Toyonoshima will grab one of the 70 year olds' kabu this coming May from outside his ichimon, and return the Izutsu kabu so that Kakuryu can open his heya.

12 months - just nice for Kakuryu to pick up the ropes of managing a heya at Michinoku, too.

And, as a sidenote, Kakuryu's wife will be the first Mongolian okamisan.

Edited by Seiyashi

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1 minute ago, Asashosakari said:
29 minutes ago, Seiyashi said:

And, as a sidenote, Kakuryu's wife will be the first Mongolian okamisan.

Asasekiryu?

I keep forgetting Asasekiryu's Takasago now. I went "right there's Tomozuna and he's married to a Japanese, then.... Yep, Kakuryu's next".

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On 24/03/2021 at 16:01, Asashosakari said:

I've got pretty much the exact opposite take on that, in that I wouldn't be surprised if Kakuryu turns out to be a future NSK rijicho, not Hakuho as is usually anticipated. Kakuryu's demeanor just seems perfectly suited for a future "face of the company" role.

Excellent point. Especially seeing as former dai-yokozunae have not had much success in reaching this position, for one reason or another. 

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5 hours ago, dingo said:

Excellent point. Especially seeing as former dai-yokozunae have not had much success in reaching this position, for one reason or another. 

Well, considering how few dai-yokozuna we have had...

Taiho was ruled out thanks to health problems relatively early in his oyakata career. Kitanoumi did however make rijicho twice (and is, in fact, the only oyakata to ever do so). Chiyonofuji was apparently not well-liked by his peers but still held a number of important posts in the hierarchy, and Takanohana imploded his own oyakata career with some assistance from his deshi. The only other dai-yokozuna, Asashoryu, for obvious reasons never got anywhere in this conversation.

We could surmise that the same attributes - the dominance, the will to win - that makes a dai-yokozuna also makes that person unsuited for the more conciliatory position of rijicho, but there's really too few data points to tell. That said, I do agree it's a lot easier to see Kakuryu as a rijicho than Hakuho, if only for the fact that he has the support and esteem of so many rikishi that will be his peers as oyakata even before his career as oyakata has started.

Edited by Seiyashi
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6 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

Well, considering how few dai-yokozuna we have had...

Taiho was ruled out thanks to health problems relatively early in his oyakata career. Kitanoumi did however make rijicho twice (and is, in fact, the only oyakata to ever do so). Chiyonofuji was apparently not well-liked by his peers but still held a number of important posts in the hierarchy, and Takanohana imploded his own oyakata career with some assistance from his deshi. The only other dai-yokozuna, Asashoryu, for obvious reasons never got anywhere in this conversation.

We could surmise that the same attributes - the dominance, the will to win - that makes a dai-yokozuna also makes that person unsuited for the more conciliatory position of rijicho, but there's really too few data points to tell. That said, I do agree it's a lot easier to see Kakuryu as a rijicho than Hakuho, if only for the fact that he has the support and esteem of so many rikishi that will be his peers as oyakata even before his career as oyakata has started.

Kakuryu has represented the rikishi before the NSK (sorry, can't remember the name of the group), and seems to be a conciliator rather than an intimidator.  These would be good traits for a future executive in the Kyokai.

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Sad to see him retire but i'm glad that he has his Japanese citizenship and can continue as an oyakata. Yes, maybe he should've gone sooner, but the mental desire to compete was there as was his sincerity, however his body was having none of it. I am glad that he's listened to his body and can now finally have the well earned rest he so richly deserves.

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NSK posted the intai conference with a career highlights package.

The bout he identifies as his most memorable is at 1:06, which got him promoted to Juryo. Featuring a raven-haired Konosuke.

Edited by yohcun
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14 minutes ago, yohcun said:

NSK posted the intai conference with a career highlights package.

 

I don't dare look, please tell me it doesn't include that koshikudake... 

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14 minutes ago, Seiyashi said:

I don't dare look, please tell me it doesn't include that koshikudake... 

No, they skip that. It's more montage of his first everything.

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5 minutes ago, yohcun said:

No, they skip that. It's more montage of his first everything.

Thank god. Although technically, it was his first and last loss by koshikudake. :-P

3:00: that sotogake against Baruto looks awfully familiar...

Man, Kakuryu in his younger days was a beast. 

Edited by Seiyashi

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3 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

Man, Kakuryu in his younger days was a beast. 

Technically, in his younger days he was a laid back and therefore pretty underachieving Maegashira, who tended to move backwards a lot and winning by pulls and slap downs. He was not necessarily loved for it by the odd foreign sumo afficionado. He also lost at a suspicious ratio when it really counted for his opponents.

Kakuryo 2.0 (beefed up, wiser, more free), though, was mostly fun to watch.

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I would like to join the chorus of well wishers. I should admit that his ascension to the rank of yokozuna was a big surprise for me back then. But as the saying goes in Mongolian wrestling, rank begets power, so he did. I look forward for his oyakata carrier. 4th Mongolian oyakata if I am not wrong, who would have thought. Well done Anand.

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1 hour ago, BuBa said:

4th Mongolian oyakata if I am not wrong

You are probably missing Tokitenku in your count. He was Magaki oyakata briefly before passing away.

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Apologies again for thread necromancy. No clue if this should be filed under a new thread entitled "Kakuryu Activities", but here is his retirement interview - it is extensive: https://taishu.jp/articles/-/93841?page=1

Retirement Interview with Yokozuna Kakuryu: "Looking back, I have no regrets at all."

Born in Mongolia, Kakuryu came to Japan at the age of 16. With his well-balanced physique and skilful sumo, Kakuryu served as yokozuna for 41 basho. Injuries have plague him in recent years, and he announced his retirement during the Haru basho in March. We asked him to reflect on his 19 years of sumo, including his passion for the ring and his words to his classmate, Yokozuna Hakuho.

I: How do you feel now that you have gone from yokozuna Kakuryu to Kakuryu Oyakata?

K: When I decided to retire in the middle of the Haru Basho, I felt that I had been released from something, and I couldn't think about anything. I feel refreshed.

I: I was also impressed by the occasional smiles you showed at your intai press conference on March 25.

K: Indeed. There were no tears (laughs). I have been sumo wrestling since I was 16 years old, and many thing have happened. However, looking back, I have no regrets. I have been absent since the July basho last year, and I was thinking, "I want to get back in the ring as soon as possible!" In the past, I had been able to return to the ring many times even when injured. That's why I participated in the joint training sessions at the Kokugikan before the Haru basho - wrestling with the younger rikishi and making my own adjustments. However, just before the basho, I tore a muscle in my left thigh during training. At the moment, my body felt good and I thought, "I'll be fine." However the injury healed slowly and I wondered if I would be able to make it to the next basho. I wanted a lot of people to see me in the ring again, and that was my goal, but as I got older, I started to think, "I'm done... I guess I've had enough." Even if I healed well, I would get injured again in a different part of the body. When this kept happening, I began to wonder if my body was giving me signals. I have a longer life ahead of me, you know.

I: Did you feel that you had reached your limits, both physically and mentally?

K: That's right. As a yokozuna, I can't go into the ring in a half-hearted state. I regret that I was not able to enter the ring with the determination that this would be my last sumo match.

I: Unlike many other Mongolian rikishi, you did not have any experience of bokh as a boy, did you?

K: Yes. Hakuho's father was a Mongolian sumo champion, and Asashoryu and Tokitenku's father were also strong men. Some people have been around bokh since they were children. But in my case, I did not have that kind of environment. I loved basketball more than that, and was a fan of the NBA (laughs). So, when I was 15 years old, there was a story that Hakkaku-oyakata was going to hold a youth sumo tournament in Mongolia, and I participated. I failed to qualify. The boys who did well in the tournament were able to go to Japan and become rikishi. Even though I had never wrestled before, I was still shocked when I failed to qualify. After that, my desire to become a rikishi great stronger, but I didn't know how to become one. When I was in such trouble, my father's acquaintance (a professor of Japanese at a university) helped me out and I sent two letter to people in the sumo business in Japan, saying, "If there is a heya that accepts me, I will do my best to live up to their expectations."

I: One of the letters arrived at Izutsu-beya, where you were to be admitted later, didn't it?

K: The letter was really left to chance, but about a month after I sent it, I received a phone call from the okamisan of Izutsu-beya at my home in Mongolia, who asked me if I would like to come to Japan right away. As expected, I was like, "Oh my God, what should I do?" Six months later, I was fortunate to be able to go to Japan. When I first entered the room, I remember the unique smell of tatami mats. Since then, I've become a man and a father. I'm glad that I was able to keep to what I wrote in my letter.

I: Your first dohyo apperance was at the Kyushu basho in 2001. The veteran rikishi of the time, Terao (now Shikoroyama-oyakata) was alos a member of Izutsu-beya.

K: Yes, the "Rikisaburo" in my name was given to me from the name that Terao had previously used, but I didn't understand the meaning until much later (laughs). In terms of life in a heya, my master told me not to go out for 6 months. I was convinced that this was a heya rule, but it had another meaning. The year I entered, many Mongolian rikishi entered as well, like Harumafuji (Hatsu) and Hakuho (Haru). However, since there were not many Mongolian rikishi in the same heya, there was no one to talk to, so the Mongolian rikishi in the vicinity would hand out with each other at night. In this way, I wouldn't have learnt Japanese and wouldn't have been able to fit in at the sumo stable - it's a vicious cycle. By forbidding the young rikishi to go outside, he helped them to learn Japanese quickly and get used to the heya and sumo culture. He also allowed me to have a cell phone, which young rikishi are usually not allowed to have and allowed me to keep in touch with my family in Mongolia. I can't thank him enough. People often ask me, "Wasn't it hard?" But I was prepared for it from the beginning, so it wasn't too hard for me. The only thing I didn't like is raw food (laughs). I couldn't eat fish.

I: In 2005, at the age of 20, you were promoted to the rank of shin-juryo.

K: Looking back, there are many memorable sumo matches, but the one that made me happiest was the one in the previous basho, where I won my fifth match in the fifth makushita division to become shin-Juryo. Hakuho and Harumafuji, who were in the same grade as me, had been moving up the ranks since I started, but I could not catch up with them. When I became a sekitori, I said, "I've finally caught up. I can't lose to my classmates!" But the result was a loss, I was sent back to the makushita division.

I: At that time, I heard that the gyoji at the heya encouraged you.

K: On the night of the final day of the tournament, Kimura Shonosuke (then Shikimori Koshinokichi) called out to me when I was depressed. He said, "Ananda, are you frustrated? You're going to have a week off from tomorrow, but if you're frustrated, why don't you sweat it out in practice?" I thought, "You are right." I was awakened. Thanks to his advice, I was able to return to Juryo in one basho and was promoted to Makuuchi a year later.

I: You were promoted to ozeki in the summer of 2012. In the most recent Hatsu and Haru bashos then, you had defeated yokozuna Hakuho.

K: I had been unable to beat Hakuho for a long time, and my first yusho came in Haru of 2014. Although I was promoted to Ozeki, there were already five Ozeki, and including me, it was the "Six Ozeki Era". Every basho, the Ozekis were competing with each other for wins and it was tough to become a yokozuna. However, it was great to have someone to compete with. You can't do your best if you don't have someone like that. Then, after winning 14 matches in 2014 Haru, I was given a chance to win the yusho.

I: In the Haru basho, you won your first championship. How did you feel?

K: When my promotion was decided, I was so anxious. I remember saying, "I'm so happy." But to tell you the truth, I was thinking, "It would be nice if I could serve as yokozuna for one or two years." I think that's how I felt. When I became a yokozuna, I understood the weight of the position and the hardships it entailed., and I also realised that Hakuho, who has been yokozuna for a long time, has overcome such hardships. I thought, "If I don't manage to yusho as yokozuna soon..." So I was really happy when I won the autumn tournament for the second time that year.

I: You also won the Haru and May tournament in 2018, and your sixth in Nagoya.

K: I had an accident before that basho, which ended up being my last victory. I cam to Nagoya after thorough training in Tokyo, and I thought, "This basho is the one!" But then I felt discomfort in my lower back, and for a week before the basho started, I devoted myself to treatment twice a day. During the first half, I was on painkillers, but I was able to win the basho by attacking quickly to prevent the back pain from worsening. However, during that time, yokozuna Kisenosato retired as did many rikishi of the same generation like Toyonoshima (now Iztusu-oyakata) and Kotoshogiku (now Hidenoyama-oyakata) who were Ozeki with me. To be honest, I was sad to see the rikishi who had fought in the same era disappear. When other rikishi of my generation retired, I thought, "Maybe it's time for me to retire, too."

I: When did you start thinking about becoming a stablemaster?

K: When I got married and my children were getting older, I thought it was time to start thinking about the future. I didn't know anything about anything other than sumo and I thought, "Now that I've been brought up to this level, I need to give something back." As many of you may know, it order to become a sumo stablemaster, you need to be Japanese. However, it is a difficult question for a foreign-born rikishi to easily accept this, including opinions of his family back home. Hakuho became Japanese before I did, but I think he must have had a lot of trouble. Now that he has announced his intention to continue his career, I'm sure he'll do something since he is the yokozuna who set such a record! As a junior members of the team, there is not much more I can say. I thought a lot about the timing of my naturalisation, and even consulted with my family in Mongolia. However, I didn't want to become a Japanese citizen too soon, and created an "escape zone" where I could retire at any time. If I quit now, I wouldn't be able to become an oyakata - I wouldn't be able to do anything! I put myself in a lonely position and put pressure on myself. If you have a way out, you can't help but want to run away.

I: So that's how it was. From now on, as an oyakata, you will be in position to teach young rikishi.

K: Until I was an Ozeki, my stablemaster told me to focus on myself. But after I became a yokozuna, I trained not only myself but also the younger rikishi. I believe that the advice of an active rikishi can give you a different perspective from that of your stablemaster. However, I feel that teaching others is a difficult task. It's not the same as forcing what you've experienced on others. I would like to teach in a way that suits each individual.

I: Do you think there will be a new yokozuna in 2021?

K: That's a difficult question. Personally, I hope Shodai, whom I trained with a lot when I was active, will do well, but I am concerned about his passive style of sumo. In terms of training hard, I would like to see Daieisho win his first basho (which he did). When he was young, I thought he had something good within him, and so trained him well. Meisei, who won the Fighting Spirit Award last basho, is also improving. After all, rikishi who work hard are always improving. For young rikishi to grow, it is important that they have ears to listen. As an oyakata, I would like to do my best to create opportunities for them.

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On 26/03/2021 at 16:00, Seiyashi said:

The only other dai-yokozuna, Asashoryu

Curious to know why you left out Wajima, Akebono, Musashimaru, Kitanofuji, etc. While there’s no formal definition and there is some subjectivity, “Dai-Yokozuna“ usually means one who has won ten yusho.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/10/23/sumo/quest-capture-10-titles-tough-challenge-current-crop-star-wrestlers/

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41 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

Curious to know why you left out Wajima, Akebono, Musashimaru, Kitanofuji, etc. While there’s no formal definition and there is some subjectivity, “Dai-Yokozuna“ usually means one who has won ten yusho.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/10/23/sumo/quest-capture-10-titles-tough-challenge-current-crop-star-wrestlers/

Eh, within the context of my original post I guess I mistyped. I meant ichidai-class yokozuna (i.e. the 20+ crowd) rather than just dai-yokozuna, because the question back then was whether Hakuho or Kakuryu was more likely to be rijicho. 

Edited by Seiyashi

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15 minutes ago, Seiyashi said:

Eh, within the context of my original post I guess I mistyped. I meant ichidai-class yokozuna (i.e. the 20+ crowd) rather than just dai-yokozuna, because the question back then was whether Hakuho or Kakuryu was more likely to be rijicho. 

Right, I gotcha. I should have followed the thread properly and worked that out.

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First day at work today. Kakuryuu came to the KKan to take part in the lecture on how to administer first aid on the dohyo in case of an injury, brought on by the untimely death of Hibikiryuu.. Sporting a white shirt (5L) and leather shoes, he said "It's hard to get used to.." He has started coaching at his heya Michinoku and will mainly do security duty at the KKan during Natsu. He has acquired a driver's license as well. "It's all going to be new for me from here on. I would like to properly learn all I can," he said.

sum21050720030009-p1.jpg

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