sumojoann

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sumojoann last won the day on August 16 2021

sumojoann had the most liked content!

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About sumojoann

  • Rank
    Sekiwake
  • Birthday 12/10/1948

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Houston, Texas
  • Interests
    SUMO!!! My husband! Also Mongolian language, history, customs and culture. All things Japanese (except sushi, sorry!). I love all animals and some insects, M.C. Escher, Louis Wain, epic music, linguistics, gardening, genealogy, gargoyles, crocheting and baking.

Affiliations

  • Heya Affiliation
    Isegahama, Arashio, Miyagino
  • Favourite Rikishi
    Terunofuji, Wakatakakage, Enho

Recent Profile Visitors

4,501 profile views
  1. sumojoann

    Hiro Morita’s “Sumo Prime Time”

    Hiro's latest installment of Sumo Prime Time, "Fall Tourney Sum Up - Tamawashi goes all the way!" was pretty basic and would appeal to newbies only, with the exception of one scene. He showed snippets of each of Tamawashi's 15 bouts, describing the action and giving the English name of the kimarite. Both the Japanese and English names of the kimarite were posted on screen at the end of each bout. Really nothing exceptional for those of us who have been sumo fans for a number of years. Typical of what's already available on Youtube. But one scene made it all worthwhile. It was already mentioned on SF (from Twitter, which I have been having issues accessing), but I don't know if what was shown on SF was a still photo or a video since I could not access it. Anyway, in Hiro's video, he showed a video of Takayasu warmly greeting Tamawashi and shaking his hand after having been defeated by him, which resulted in Tamawashi winning the Yusho. Hiro mentions Takayasu's good sportsmanship, but to me it went way beyond that -- a lot of respect, kindness and even affection. This video was worth watching solely for that scene. It starts at 5:25.
  2. sumojoann

    Corona and sumo

    What are the current food and alcohol measures? This may be posted already but what is the daily spectator cap for Kyushu?
  3. sumojoann

    What's so special about Hokuseiho?

    While I agree that bokh isn't a DIRECT factor in Hokuseiho's development, I think it is indirect. He was quite inspired and influenced by Hakuho. Bokh, as we know, is one of Mongolia's three national sports, and is deeply ingrained in virtually all native-born Mongolian men. It's such a deep part of their culture, a culture that Mongolians are extremely proud of. I think when it comes to Hakuho, you can take him out of Mongolia but you can't take Mongolia out of him. Bokh is part of his heritage, even if he never participated in it. Whatever Mongolian cultural pride that Hokuseiho had before he met Hakuho is difficult to measure since he left Mongolia for Japan at the age of five. However, once he met Hakuho, which occurred several times, I believe Hakuho would have emphasized the importance of his Mongolian heritage. Yes, Hakuho, the son of a Mongolian Dai Yokozuna, was encouraged by his father to pursue other sports, which he did for a while (basketball). His father was a great influence on him. That being said, even as a young child, he gravitated towards sumo and was still essentially a child himself (age 15) when he became a rikishi. Even if he didn't participate in bokh, it was still a major part of his heritage. Regarding Kakuryu, still a major part of his cultural heritage, even though to my knowledge, there is no ancestral history of involvement in bokh. I think Sumostew presented a balanced view. Perhaps I should have said in my original post that bokh was ONE reason for the Mongolian-born wrestlers' success, not THE reason.
  4. Sumostew has just uploaded an interesting YT video, "What's so special about Hokuseiho?" Not only does she delve into Hokuseiho's background, she also analyzes why Mongolian's have done so well in ozumo, going beyond the obvious -- that bokh is the reason. Using height and weight charts, plus snippets of videos to illustrate, it's all well done. I particularly enjoyed the photo of a very young Hokuseiho (who looked like he was 6 years old) meeting Hakuho, and having a sit-down chat.
  5. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    I think you're right. My doctor, who otherwise seemed like an intelligent person, actually said (when I told her how exciting Japanese professional sumo was), "But isn't that all fake?" Maybe we should accept them as a new member of SF and the "Wise Ones" on the forum can attempt to educate them, although sometimes you can't fix stupid.
  6. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    The list of Sansho is now officially posted on the NSK website. (You have to scroll down below the Champions' list). https://www.sumo.or.jp/EnHonbashoMain/champions/
  7. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    Yeah, I read that your loonies are in big trouble.
  8. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    Hiro uploaded his latest "Sumo Prime Time" video, "Day 14 Tourney: Who's going to win it all?" about 11 hours ago. Someone made a very interesting comment. They wished that Hiro had covered some of the interesting matches in the lower ranks. They specifically mentioned the Hamasu vs Yamato match in Jonidan. Apparently Yamato, who weighs only 78kg, attempted a tasukizori against Hamasu, who weighs 132kg. Yamato lost. He had the arm and the leg locked, but not the strength to follow through. ****NOTE**** -- Does anyone have a video of the Hamasu vs Yamato Day 14 match?
  9. sumojoann

    Hiro Morita’s “Sumo Prime Time”

    Hiro's latest, "Fall Tourney Day 14: Who's going to win it all?" was interesting because he showed the final Juryo matches leading up to Tochimusashi's Yusho, including Kotokuzan defeating Hokuseiho, and Atamifuji defeating Tochimusashi. And of course Hiro also covered the excitement in Makuuchi leading up to Day 15. I laughed when he said, "Takayasu, the former Ozeki, knows he can't have any more hiccups." One comment was very interesting. Someone wished that Hiro had covered some of the interesting matches in the lower ranks. He specifically mentioned the Hamasu vs Yamato match in Jonidan. Apparently Yamato, who weighs only 78kg, attempted a tasukizori against Hamasu, who weighs 132kg. Yamato lost. He had the arm and the leg locked, but not the strength to follow through. ****NOTE**** -- Does anyone have a video of the Hamasu vs Yamato Day 14 match?
  10. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    Here is my favorite "majestic and elusive" double henka. A quick version of the Japanese crane mating dance. Harumafuji vs Tochinishin Aki basho 2011 Day 10 Sept 20. Kinta's video. It starts at 5:45.
  11. Sorry, I should have been more clear about the rules governing independent tourists from countries other than the US. I looked at several articles and they mentioned that the rules could be different, of course, for other countries, but since the differences weren't spelled out, I focused on the US. Great to know about the tickets for Hakuho's danpatsu.
  12. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    Is there a video of this match available?
  13. I'm putting this announcement here since it means that we can go to Kyushu this year if we want to, so I consider it to be sumo-related. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida announced Thurs that Japan will be open to independent tourists effective Oct 11, 2022. No visa required and no quarantine if you are from the US, and you must have proof that you've had 3 vax. https://news.yahoo.com/japan-allowing-independent-tourists-visit-190753547.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall
  14. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    It's called karma, Takakeisho.
  15. sumojoann

    Aki 2022 discussion (results)

    I thought it was a chickensh*t move on Takakeisho's part to henka Hokutofuji, thus knocking him out of first place, but it seems like some people think it's perfectly fine. I'm not one of those people.