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All three of Takayasu's career fusenshos are against Ozeki or Yokozuna:

  1. Kotooushuu, Aki 2013
  2. Goueidou, Natsu 2015
  3. Kakuryuu, Nagoya 2016
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All three of Takayasu's career fusenshos are against Ozeki or Yokozuna:

Heh, that's a rather amusing line of inquiry that I've never thought about before. Interestingly, Hakuho's first four fusensho all came against ozeki (with Hakuho himself in four different ranks), until Osunaarashi wrecked the streak last year.

But the most astounding thing might be Tamanishiki - 6 career fusensho and all against sekiwake or komusubi.

Edited by Asashosakari
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(inspired by elsewhere)

The earliest day on which a basho (15-bout era) has ever seen a sole leader with a less-than-perfect record was Day 7 when 5 rikishi have managed to be on top alone with a 6-1 record, most recently in Aki 1992.

The earliest day ever with a sole leader two wins clear of the field was Hatsu 1998 Day 6 when nobody except 6-0 Wakanohana had a better record than 4-2.

(For completeness, the earliest ever sole leaders regardless of circumstances have been seen fifteen times on Day 4. Incidentally, Day 4 is also the earliest day on which every makuuchi rikishi had at least one loss, though that's happened much less often.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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How long has it been since Hakuhō has won with a proper nage? I remember him being an uwatenage beast but I feel like it’s been years since I’ve seen that. (I’m aware he got a “shitatenage” win this basho but that wasn’t really a nage…)

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How long has it been since Hakuhō has won with a proper nage? I remember him being an uwatenage beast but I feel like it’s been years since I’ve seen that. (I’m aware he got a “shitatenage” win this basho but that wasn’t really a nage…)

Natsu day 13, I'd say, against Kisenosato, would be the latest one to satisfy your definition of "proper"- technically, his utchari on senshuuraku against Kakuryuu was a nage, but wasn't entirely nage-ish. (I don't believe I'm saying things like that in this delightfully maths-filled thread)

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Nagoya basho 2016 is only the second basho for yokozuna Hakohu where he has more than two losses after day 12 (not counting his kyujo retreat for aki 2015 after day two). In the other (Natsu 2012) he finished 10-5.

And his first yokozuna basho was excatly nine years before (Nagoya 2007), so that are 50 out of 52 bashos with at least 10 wins after day 12.

Edited by Tsubame

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The only two rikishi to have started their Ozeki run from a komusubi yusho are the Hanada brothers, Taka and Waka.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query.aspx?show_form=0&form1_rank=K&form1_y=on&form1_m=on&columns=4

Although some start from even lower...

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi.aspx?shikona=futabayama&heya=-1&shusshin=-1&b=-1&high=-1&hd=-1&entry=-1&intai=-1&sort=1

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The only two rikishi to have started their Ozeki run from a komusubi yusho are the Hanada brothers, Taka and Waka.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query.aspx?show_form=0&form1_rank=K&form1_y=on&form1_m=on&columns=4

Although some start from even lower...

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi.aspx?shikona=futabayama&heya=-1&shusshin=-1&b=-1&high=-1&hd=-1&entry=-1&intai=-1&sort=1

I'm well aware, Terunofuji started his run from M2 too. I was just searching specifically for komusubi yusho as they're extremely rare.

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Looking at this made me realize that Futabayama's fabled yokozuna reign covered the war years. Was he really that good, or was he fighting a diminished set of stay-at-homes?

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Looking at this made me realize that Futabayama's fabled yokozuna reign covered the war years. Was he really that good, or was he fighting a diminished set of stay-at-homes?

What's really fabled about Futabayama is his record unbeaten run, which went from Jan 36 to Jan 39. That's three whole years in the two-bashos-a-year period, and it all took place well before any Japanese involvement in the last big unpleasantness.

Overall, though, Futabayama's percentage of yushos per basho is lower than Hakuho's, and he never had the opportunity to see if he could win 86/90 bouts per year twice...

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Rikidozan is the only rikishi in history who faced his first yokozuna opponent in a playoff bout.

(I'm rooting for Takanoiwa to become the second.)

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What's really fabled about Futabayama is his record unbeaten run, which went from Jan 36 to Jan 39. That's three whole years in the two-bashos-a-year period, and it all took place well before any Japanese involvement in the last big unpleasantness.

From 1937 to 1945 occured the second sino-japanese war. It was a local conflict that mainly took place on mainland China before (and during) the WWII. But we can say Japan was at war during the majority of Futabayama's outstanding winning streak.

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What's really fabled about Futabayama is his record unbeaten run, which went from Jan 36 to Jan 39. That's three whole years in the two-bashos-a-year period, and it all took place well before any Japanese involvement in the last big unpleasantness.

From 1937 to 1945 occured the second sino-japanese war. It was a local conflict that mainly took place on mainland China before (and during) the WWII. But we can say Japan was at war during the majority of Futabayama's outstanding winning streak.

I was aware of that, but I'm assuming that the earlier conflict wasn't as demanding on human resources as the situation post-1941.

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Ryusei (7-0 from low makushita) looks like he will pass Kagamio (2-4 Ms10ish) on the banzuke and become heyagashira of the tiny Kagamiyama-beya for Aki. Unless I lazy-eyed my way past one time Ryusei passed him before, the last time Kagamio was not heyagashira was exactly 10 years before this year's Aki basho, when there were twice as many rikishi in the heya. (There also hasn't been another rikishi in Kagamiyama-beya since Kotooshu won a yusho)

Edited by Gurowake
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In all 18 makuuchi playoff bouts featuring a maegashira, a maegashira has lost.

The only makuuchi playoff bout that a maegashira has won was Kyokutenhou's against Tochiouzan, but the streak did not break, since a maegashira was defeated in that playoff bout.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query.aspx?show_form=0&form1_rank=M&form1_yd=on&form1_m=on

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