Kintamayama

Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

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This blog post was mentioned on SML, didn't notice it posted here yet.

Because it's written so poorly, yokazuna and all?

I don't think it's poorly-written, actually, just not a whole lot in there that's new for anyone who's been a fan the last five years. Though I was surprised to read this:

Especially after Wakanohana and Takanohana had retired, and for the first time, there was no Japanese Grand Champion left.

Surely anyone whose sumo fandom originated in the Taka-Waka/Hawaiians era knows that Akebono was promoted as the first foreign yokozuna at a time without any Japanese yokozuna at all?

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Especially after Wakanohana and Takanohana had retired, and for the first time, there was no Japanese Grand Champion left.

Surely anyone whose sumo fandom originated in the Taka-Waka/Hawaiians era knows that Akebono was promoted as the first foreign yokozuna at a time without any Japanese yokozuna at all?

I stand by "poorly written"..

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This blog post was mentioned on SML, didn't notice it posted here yet.

"...and even was disqualified for pulling hair" - yup, that surely put the final nail in Asashoryu's coffin.

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Not much here, but came across this one today.

Taipei Post today..kind of annoying, or am I a bit too sensitive when it comes to sumo??

I first saw this article in the British guardian newspaper, at first i got excited at seeing a Sumo article in "mainstream media" then i had the misfortune of reading it lol :) i agree with Kintamayama, it's not very good, personally i found it to be uninformative and somewhat disrespectful, for example:

"Fat men in nappies: that's our gut reaction. Skim a languid eye over it and it scarcely resembles a sport at all. At first glance it's an excuse to show off the participants' bodies, with particular emphasis on the buttocks – a bit like beach volleyball with diabetic coach drivers."

It seems to miss the point of Sumo and even Japanese culture when he says things like this:

"The Japanese have a peculiar custom when saying goodbye: It is polite for them to stand rooted to the spot, watching you vanish into the distance until you are a dot on the horizon."

Although i am not Japanese i don't find that "peculiar" at all, i find it to be a charming, even touching mark of respect, and the type of gesture i'd like to see more of in my own culture.

Edited by Bugman

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Oh, they are the same article, in two different places. Sorry..

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Oh, they are the same article, in two different places. Sorry..

Right. And since they are the 'send in a first-time visitor on a package tour and print his reactions' the resultant article is not going to be exactly riveting to people who have seen live sumo even twice.

Orion

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Bugman...Charlie Brooker is a very famous writer these days. He is actually extremely funny, but he was sent on a tour of Asia by the Guardian to do some travel pieces. It's not his natural medium so he comes across a bit awkwardly, but he's a good guy and is basically writing from the point of view of a complete newbie, something that most Guardian readers would be regarding sumo.

He excels when writing about TV, games or popular culture. He also presents shows. Watch the Screen Burn round-up of 2011 with Charlie Brooker (search on YouTube) to get the idea of his humour. That hour-long round-up had me crying with laughter in parts...but it obviously won't be for everyone here.

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Bugman...Charlie Brooker is a very famous writer these days. He is actually extremely funny, but he was sent on a tour of Asia by the Guardian to do some travel pieces. It's not his natural medium so he comes across a bit awkwardly, but he's a good guy and is basically writing from the point of view of a complete newbie, something that most Guardian readers would be regarding sumo.

He excels when writing about TV, games or popular culture. He also presents shows. Watch the Screen Burn round-up of 2011 with Charlie Brooker (search on YouTube) to get the idea of his humour. That hour-long round-up had me crying with laughter in parts...but it obviously won't be for everyone here.

Fair enough, humour is subjective and massively so.

To me though that article feels like it was written by someone who went a little too far in the pursuit of a laugh, entered the perilous realm of the unfunny and just kept going.

Culture is a prickly thing, if i go abroad and see something i don't understand, i try to learn about it and afford it some respect, rather than approach it with the more careless attitude i may reserve for more mundane things, especially if i want to take news of it back home to other people.

I have read some other of Mr Brooker's articles and i found them very funny in places, the usual irreverent attitude didn't do it for me this time however, this one rubbed me up the wrong way i admit, cultural things that are valuable are worthy of being treated a with a little more tact, again, there lies that fine line of what one person may find funny, and another may not.

It's perfectly possible for Sumo to be the subject of good-natured humour, Kintamayama and others on this forum have proven that, i just don't feel the humour in that article was in particularly good taste.

Just a personal opinion of a nobody though, nothing more than that :)

Edited by Bugman
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Bugman...Charlie Brooker is a very famous writer these days. He is actually extremely funny, but he was sent on a tour of Asia by the Guardian to do some travel pieces. It's not his natural medium so he comes across a bit awkwardly, but he's a good guy and is basically writing from the point of view of a complete newbie, something that most Guardian readers would be regarding sumo.

He excels when writing about TV, games or popular culture. He also presents shows. Watch the Screen Burn round-up of 2011 with Charlie Brooker (search on YouTube) to get the idea of his humour. That hour-long round-up had me crying with laughter in parts...but it obviously won't be for everyone here.

Fair enough, humour is subjective and massively so.

To me though that article feels like it was written by someone who went a little too far in the pursuit of a laugh, entered the perilous realm of the unfunny and just kept going.

Culture is a prickly thing, if i go abroad and see something i don't understand, i try to learn about it and afford it some respect, rather than approach it with the more careless attitude i may reserve for more mundane things, especially if i want to take news of it back home to other people.

I have read some other of Mr Brooker's articles and i found them very funny in places, the usual irreverent attitude didn't do it for me this time however, this one rubbed me up the wrong way i admit, cultural things that are valuable are worthy of being treated a with a little more tact, again, there lies that fine line of what one person may find funny, and another may not.

It's perfectly possible for Sumo to be the subject of good-natured humour, Kintamayama and others on this forum have proven that, i just don't feel the humour in that article was in particularly good taste.

Just a personal opinion of a nobody though, nothing more than that :)

I have been invited to write a response to this piece and would like to make it from the greater sumo community.

Anything you want to say to Mr. Brooker please send to me via PM, mail, or on this page in the next couple of days.

Differences of opinion about sumo with some site members are irrelevant to this article, and I will quote you as you wish to be quoted with edits only made for clarity, language - even if not of the same opinion as myself regarding the piece.

Please indicate the name you would like to be referred to if the quote is used and country / region of origin.

Thank you.

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Appreciate the thought but i have no questions for Mr Brooker, i read his article which was linked here, being diabetic myself didn't find his joking about "diabetic coach drivers" much to laugh at among other things, and stated my opinion here on the forum.

Thanks for the offer though, i wish you the best with your own article.

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Appreciate the thought but i have no questions for Mr Brooker, i read his article which was linked here, being diabetic myself didn't find his joking about "diabetic coach drivers" much to laugh at among other things, and stated my opinion here on the forum.

Thanks for the offer though, i wish you the best with your own article.

thank you.

If the article flies or fails will be based on fans wishing to express opinions either way.

Personally it is just me doing a piece I have been asked to do that I will, admittedly benefit from financially, but not massively so.

The Guardian has a bit of a rep for double booking articles and taking whichever they prefer, not paying those they don't agree with/like. And personally I don't know Charle Brooker, but maybe that is because I have been out of the UK for so the better part of 20 years.

Good luck to him of course - just don't think he made any effort to properly represent the guides that took him to sumo and told him what was going on.

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Being a British comedy dai-fan , I know Charlie Brooker well (not personally, from TV). Sometimes he comes off as borderline aggressive, but he is extremely clever and funny at times.

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Being a British comedy dai-fan , I know Charlie Brooker well (not personally, from TV). Sometimes he comes off as borderline aggressive, but he is extremely clever and funny at times.

that a quote to use Moti?

Edited by Randomitsuki
Deleted attempt at moderator mockery

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Being a British comedy dai-fan , I know Charlie Brooker well (not personally, from TV). Sometimes he comes off as borderline aggressive, but he is extremely clever and funny at times.

I would go further, in suggesting that 'aggressive' is part of the persona that he (?mostly?) puts on for comedic purposes.

Now, GO AWAY*

*To quote Mr Brooker - as he used to say at the end of many of his early TV programmes.

[Disclaimer: I am a moderate fan of Mr Brooker.]

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Being a British comedy dai-fan , I know Charlie Brooker well (not personally, from TV). Sometimes he comes off as borderline aggressive, but he is extremely clever and funny at times.

that a quote to use Moti?

Sure, quote away, although it's not that memorable a quote..

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Charlie has made his career on his sharp, edgy, occasionally surreal gags, and they are often offensive. British humour is often like that, so I guess for me it is not offensive as long as I know it's satire and that he is not by nature a nasty guy. I've just got used to it, and nothing offends me personally anyway (yes, I know I'm in the minority here). The sumo piece was written for the complete beginners crowd, and he certainly came across like a complete beginner. I suspect that was intentional on his part - he was probably told what was happening, but decided to play dumb anyway because it would convey the feeling of being in the stadium for the first time as a total newbie more powerfully.

PS. To Moti and others, here's the YouTube link for his Screenwipe of 2011. It's superb. Doug Stanhope is also fantastic.

Warning: some 'strong' language and may be offensive to sensitive types.

PPS. Moti, make sure you watch the six episodes of Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, if you like British comedy. I suspect you'll laugh as much as I did...non-stop.

Sorry I went a bit off-topic here, lads.

Edited by Pandaazuma

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PPS. Moti, make sure you watch the six episodes of Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, if you like British comedy. I suspect you'll laugh as much as I did...non-stop.

Sorry I went a bit off-topic here, lads.

I've got darkplace hospital on dvd, great stuff :) i never got round to getting the Dean lerner, but that was pretty good too. ""If Won-Ton hears about this my arse is grass, and he's got a lawnmower!"

Edit* almost forgot league of gentlemen, the guys in that are wonderful actors as well as comedians. (and if you like those, "catterick" was interesting too :) sorry for off-topic hehe)

Edited by Bugman

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PPS. Moti, make sure you watch the six episodes of Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, if you like British comedy. I suspect you'll laugh as much as I did...non-stop.

Please, Panda, give me a bit more credit than that.. One of the innovative breakthrough series, another one totally underrated vis-a vis its pioneer-ness(??), along with Black Books and Green Wing, just to mention a couple. (Yes, I'm in love with Tamsin..)

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Brooker should try the Crocodile pie instead of the Lemon Roo Pie http://www.thelonebaker.com/journal/2010/1/23/crocodile-and-kangaroo-meat-pies.html

As our Ozsumo Fearless Leader Katrina once said to me -Why do people always think the mawashi is a nappy? Jesus was crucified wearing a lot less and they don’t say he was wearing a nappy!

Whoever put that picture on the Taipei times needs to be pulverized into the dohyo. I despise that stock image of an unhealthily obese old man.He has no muscle definition and those heavy bandages are just sad on his uneven swollen lymphedema ridden cankles. It is probably the most prolific image lifted off the net and used by graphic artists too tight to get some real sumotori images.That dreadful outline and those hideous bandages also appear on far too much online merchandise. There is no way that bloke has ever set foot in a real dohyo. He doesn't even look japanese.That's my rage for the day. Kanpai

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PPS. Moti, make sure you watch the six episodes of Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, if you like British comedy. I suspect you'll laugh as much as I did...non-stop.

Please, Panda, give me a bit more credit than that.. One of the innovative breakthrough series, another one totally underrated vis-a vis its pioneer-ness(??), along with Black Books and Green Wing, just to mention a couple. (Yes, I'm in love with Tamsin..)

Very glad to hear it!

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