Kintamayama

Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

Recommended Posts

In 2010, he went 8-7 (the 0-4-11 was in November.)

Exactly. That is the venue I was referring to, Kyushu.

I agree journalists do make mistakes, but I would also suggest that journalists look for a story, and then manipulate stats to support said story....

Yes. A big chunk of articles are so based. The title reads like : "So-and-so has yet to score at Old Trafford in 5 years" or sometimes "Star faces Old-Trafford taboo". And the whole article goes on about questioning the player's ability, if he chokes, or if he is Premier-League worthy and on and on ... while the 'stats' say he played 5 times, 2 off the bench and one with the flu. It doesn't bother to mention whether he has assisted or not, which side has won.

For what it is worth, my own opinion is that it has nothing to do with the venue (and I could probably use his career stats to 'prove' this, if I so wished), but with his current state of mind.

That is my point, too. I would add to that his physical condition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 2010, he went 8-7 (the 0-4-11 was in November.)

Exactly. That is the venue I was referring to, Kyushu.

I agree journalists do make mistakes, but I would also suggest that journalists look for a story, and then manipulate stats to support said story....

Yes. A big chunk of articles are so based. The title reads like : "So-and-so has yet to score at Old Trafford in 5 years" or sometimes "Star faces Old-Trafford taboo". And the whole article goes on about questioning the player's ability, if he chokes, or if he is Premier-League worthy and on and on ... while the 'stats' say he played 5 times, 2 off the bench and one with the flu. It doesn't bother to mention whether he has assisted or not, which side has won.

For what it is worth, my own opinion is that it has nothing to do with the venue (and I could probably use his career stats to 'prove' this, if I so wished), but with his current state of mind.

That is my point, too. I would add to that his physical condition.

Good point! Overall, I think we concur (Singing drunk...) .

Edit: Now, I re-read what you say (and equate Kyushu with November, d'oh!), your point is brilliant (using the limited stats available ;-)) - so September (AKI basho!) is perhaps a good time to make the move to Yokozuna for Harumafufi, unless there are injuries, limited data for stats to have any meaning, stress etc... :-).

Edited by Jejima
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I wonder whether this weight is OK as a human being, but I only gained this much weight because Japanese food is so good," says Gagamaru.

I feel sad about this, i think he is too heavy and that it really hampers (pardon the pun) his movement, today Harumafuji pushed really hard up against him, and the only thing Gaga could do is try to push back but it leaves his body overly Horizontal like a bridge, with all that weight all Haru had to do was step away and let Gaga fall to the floor, it happens to him a lot, just too little mobility, i think for his own health more than anything he should lose a bit if he can, thanks for the article :)

Edited by Bugman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A piece I wrote in the July issue of Sumo World. Didn't work out obviously for Wakamisho as his back issues have been pretty bad recently.

Scan isn't great quality but should be legible.

EPSON003.jpg

EPSON001.jpg

Thanks for this report!

Wakamisho hits the spot that his biggest enemy is he himself - or his mental preparation.

Today was another example which showed that he has to tackle the problem between his ears...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no problem between his ears, there is a problem with his back but I think an even bigger problem is his lack of technical skills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to think he doesn't have a Plan B when his bouts don't go as planned, but on further consideration he does seem to have several Plan B's, he's just no good at executing any of them yet... Should come with time. Nobody ever said high makushita was easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure he will, as I always say, patience is everything ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark

As a result, anything short of an 8-7 winning record will see them demoted back down to sekiwake from where promotion back to ozeki is incredibly difficult.

Don't they get automatically re-promoted if they get 10 wins as sekiwake in the basho following demotion? That doesn't seem particularly difficult for these guys -- if, as they say, healthy. OK, Kotooshu perhaps, but the others?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark

As a result, anything short of an 8-7 winning record will see them demoted back down to sekiwake from where promotion back to ozeki is incredibly difficult.

Don't they get automatically re-promoted if they get 10 wins as sekiwake in the basho following demotion? That doesn't seem particularly difficult for these guys -- if, as they say, healthy. OK, Kotooshu perhaps, but the others?

I get a feeling that the article's main focus was to spark interest among the casual sumo fans (or even the non-sumo fans) by enhancing the perception of an exciting basho to come, not to inform dedicated sumo enthusiasts. In that sense, I assume a few overstatements are warranted...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the above Asahi article:

"A total of 12 wins is considered a minimum requirement for yokozuna."

(Whatever above, it is funny...)

I think for me personally i'd expect a Yokozuna to get ten wins, ten wins for an Ozeki is a nice convincing showing, ten wins for a Yokozuna is a "must try harder!" but certainly not something to begin intai speculation, thats just me though, i don't know if expectation of some other fans who are more knowledgable is higher or lower, i have read regularly from different places that ten wins or "double-digits" is to be expected for an Ozeki, so i guess they must expect higher than that for a Yokozuna.

Edit* Hakuho is also the only Yokozuna other than Harumafuji that i have ever seen active, i understand that he is a special Yokozuna in his great amount of victories, so comparing him to others might well be unfair, i don't have the experience to know, i think if Haru can get ten wins next time that will be good enough..

Edited by Bugman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's the first Western print article in a long time that I didn't think "That author's an idiot."

I think it's a Kyodo article translated..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's the first Western print article in a long time that I didn't think "That author's an idiot."

I think it's a Kyodo article translated..

Well, it says 'Reuters' at the beginning. (Sigh...)

Orion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the above Asahi article:

"A total of 12 wins is considered a minimum requirement for yokozuna."

(Whatever above, it is funny...)

I don't quite see what's so funny about that quote; in theory of course a yokozuna is expected to win the yusho or be in contention on senshuraku every time but in practice I think 12 is a good rule of thumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark Buckton

Mark, Musashigawa already has a new recruit, to join the nephew in March.

Also, disagree on Kyokutenhou embarrassing himself lately. If anything, he is outdoing himself . 48-42 on the year? Very good. Compare that to 42-48 in 2009, 40-50 in 2010 and 32-43 in 2011 - any way you look at it, not embarrassing.

Wakanosato? Along those lines. 47-43 in 2012. 30-36-9 in 2011. 40-50 in 2010. Best year in three years.

Edited by Kintamayama
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cheers Moti.

With Wakanosato and Kyokutenho mentioned above, I am looking more at the quality of their sumo more than the numbers which can be deceiving.

Wakanosato for example has had back-to-back kachikoshi just once in over 3 years. Same with Kyokutenho which is part of the reason for decent overall, but misleading, scores. Suffer a hammering in upper maegashira, drop low enough to win a bunch, be promoted ...... and repeat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wakanosato for example has had back-to-back kachikoshi just once in over 3 years. Same with Kyokutenho which is part of the reason for decent overall, but misleading, scores. Suffer a hammering in upper maegashira, drop low enough to win a bunch, be promoted ...... and repeat.

That has been Kyokutenhou's bread and butter for years- KK, MK, KK, MK. Wakanosato, OTOH, after that injury, has never been himself again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now