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Jonosuke

Kanji Shikona

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You are almost right. odori just means dance, together with byō it's dance maniac or dance sickness; byō (this kanji only) means sickness, illness. So Odoriō is dancing emperor 踊皇 or dancing king 踊王, depending on the kanji for ō.

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:-D Thanks a lot. Wow - my shikona really means something. (Sign of approval)

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Lord of the Dance perhaps? :-) Although, Michael Flatley might have something to say about that

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Should I change my shikona or not?

Any suggestions?

I have tried to apply a Kanji to your Shikona.

I as well as Jonosuke-san was only able to do making the sound into a Kanji.

It is "不破臼殿若 Fuwa-usu-tono-waka" which I thought of.

富押戸ノ若 is quite more suitable than this as a Shikona.

If it only reduces by one character, it is possible to transpose "戸ノ" to a "殿."

Or I do not feel sense of incongruity to making "富押戸若" which excluded "ノ" read with "Fuosu-to-no-waka."

Shikona of the gamers, we, does not have restriction in the number of characters.

Therefore, you do not need to dare reduce the number of characters.

Furthermore, in order that you may change into a Kanji, there is no necessity of changing the original Shikona.

If you are not already tired of it, please you value your great Shikona. :-)

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Maybe you could help me with mine ? Asamoe comes from Asa and the english Moe, which are my initials translated into an american first name (i gave myself an additional letter). I believe, that Moe in English is pronounced like "mow the lawn" and in japanes mo-e (like in Kakizoe) ?

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Maybe you could help me with mine ? Asamoe comes from Asa and the english Moe, which are my initials translated into an american first name (i gave myself an additional letter). I believe, that Moe in English is pronounced like "mow the lawn" and in japanes mo-e (like in Kakizoe) ?

I'm no expert by any means, but I'd say that the "zoe" in Kakizoe is NOT like the english "mow". Since you're presumably German, I can tell you that Japanese vowels are more or less like the German ones, so it's like "zo-e", with distinct o and e. Just be aware that the "z" is voiced and absolutely not like the German sharp "z".

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Asamoe, your guess is correct. I think that Doitsuyama has misread or gone off track. (Just do not get it...)

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Asamoe, your guess is correct. I think that Doitsuyama has misread or gone off track.  (Just do not get it...)

but is trying to help and contribute - please enlighten poor Asamoe if you can. That said - don't the NZers have but 4 vowels what with the 'e' essentially being an 'i' of sorts? (Whistling...)

Pass me the pin so I can write a litter would you dear boy? (Hugging...)

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'eavens, can't 'ave the Henglish talk'n 'bout spell'n now can we lad? 'specially int north!

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Maybe you could help me with mine ? Asamoe comes from Asa and the english Moe, which are my initials translated into an american first name (i gave myself an additional letter). I believe, that Moe in English is pronounced like "mow the lawn" and in japanes mo-e (like in Kakizoe) ?

If Moe is read with "moe" by Roman alphabet reading, as for it, "萌" (the sign in which things occur, or a bud should come out of the meaning) is applied to it.

It is also possible to use the character "猛" (brave or fierce).

However, If only "猛"(mou), it will seem to be Chinese people's name.

If there is the necessity of pronouncing "e", you may add the "英" (surpasses or excelled).

Moreover, "猛英" mouei (moe)(takehide) seems to be a somewhat old-fashioned ordinary name of a person.

A "夢" (dream) is applied if it is read with "muu" by Roman alphabet reading.

Or it can read with "muu" also by "夢宇" (dream + universe).

For me, latter one is liking when reading with "muu".

Only the very commonplace idea occurred to me.

朝萌(asa-moe),朝猛英(asa-mouei),朝夢(asa-muu),朝夢宇(asa-muu).

Supposing you are not hurry, you will also need to hear the opinion of other persons. (Whistling...)

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Ok, so I misunderstood Asa-Moe. I apologize. I hereforth assume that the desired shikona shall sound like Asamo-e as in Kakizo-e... Then I suggest 朝燃. The first kanji is well-known, I hope. The second kanji is the root of moeru - "burn", just as the zoe in Kakizoe is the root of soeru. "Morning burn", sounds good to me.

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'eavens, can't 'ave the Henglish talk'n 'bout spell'n now can we lad? 'specially int north!

Barra da boy, barra da!

aah (Whistling...) the confusion of the uncouth and linguistically challenged beings in the white rose county (and the eastern part of the Pennines), with he eloquence and finesse of those on the (victorious) western red rose side where education is a birthright and not just for the fancypants!

That said - Heartbeat and Emmerdale are sorely missed here in Japan. (Sign of approval)

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I would like to know if it would be possible to make up a shikona out of the kanji for the Japanese war god Hachiman (ideally, but it could also involve a kanji meaning "war" or "warlike") and fern (the plant). I know this request may seem a little weird, but to me (I have my reasons) this would be the ultimate shikona. (You are going off-topic...)

Any suggestions that you would think would sound nice?

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please enlighten poor Asamoe if you can

Thank you very much. From what i read, i prefer 朝燃 (if i understood it correctly).

Is there a page, where you could look at the Kanji ?

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I would greatly appreciate if someone could guess a kanji for my shikona. Unfortunately, it is not even japanese related, so I understand it may be hard to find a good one.

Thanks in advance for the effort! (You are going off-topic...)

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I would like to know if it would be possible to make up a shikona out of the kanji for the Japanese war god Hachiman (ideally, but it could also involve a kanji meaning "war" or "warlike") and fern (the plant). I know this request may seem a little weird, but to me (I have my reasons) this would be the ultimate shikona. :-D

Any suggestions that you would think would sound nice?

Generally the shrine(神社)by which the character of Hachiman(八幡) is entitled is said that 30,000-40,000 places exist to Japan.

The Emperor and a Samurai believed in as God which removes originally the calamity which falls on on a country.

Large ordinary persons believe in as God of charm against misfortunes(厄除け)[Yakuyoke] now.

Hachiman God(八幡神) began and "続日本紀"[shoku-nihon-gi] {Record for ( it A.D.697 and continues till 791) 95 years} appeared in the history book.

The generalissimo named 大野東人 [Oono-Azumando] was ordered to perform ascendancy of a foreign enemy by the Emperor.

It is written there in that case that Azumando(東人) prayed to Hachiman God and wished the divine protection. (You are going off-topic...)

In the far past, there was a historical fact in which those who have "Azuma" in a name worshipped Hachiman God like present you.

By this, your request was not strange at all and I felt the relevance destined rather between Azuma and Hachiman.

On the other hand, about the fern, I do not have a good idea.

Generally a fern is written in a kana character,シダorしだ.

Although there is an applied Kanji, it is unsuitable for a name and, moreover, is not read correctly.

I introduce it only for reference.

It is a "羊歯"[shida] (tooth of the sheep), or "歯朶"[shida] (plant which carried out the dental form and hanging down).

This is also unsuitable although the kind of a fern with common No. 1 is called 裏白 [urajiro] (since the back side of a leaf is white).

Though regrettable, there is no choices of other Kanji about a fern.

If you adhere to a fern, I will still transpose the sound of that to Kanji as the last means.

It is the idea which transposes "fern" to 煌[kou] [fan] [faan] (signs that it shines).

八幡神煌[Hachiman-shinnou]or 八幡煌[Hachiman-ou] or 八幡東煌[Hachiman-touou].

In this case, it will be necessary to make "fan" read forcibly with "ou".

First of all, is the English pronunciation itself meaningless for you?

Anyway, my recommendation of No. 1 is that a fern is disregarded.

The good luck of 八幡太郎[Hachiman-Taro](A.D. 1039-1106) who was the expert of bow and arrows is shared. How is 八幡東龍 ?

八幡太郎 is the alias of 源義家[Minamoto-no-yoshiie] who was a samurai's chief.

Since it reads with [Yahata-touryu], without reading 八幡東龍 with [Hachiman-azumaryu], and it is direction more natural and sound is good, I like it.

However, you do not always use [...] for the right of 八幡東龍 for a supplement of reading.

If you think Azumaryu, even if Japanese people pronounce it how, it is Azumaryu rightly.

Probably, this post had become the thing which it is brief and is easy to read, if I was making this simple proposal (八幡東龍) from the beginning.

I am glad if at least you do not feel this post tedious but. (You are going off-topic...)

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Probably, this post had become the thing which it is brief and is easy to read, if I was making this simple proposal (八幡東龍) from the beginning.

I am glad if at least you do not feel this post tedious but.  (You are going off-topic...)

Thanks very much for writing such a comprehensive answer! (You are going off-topic...)

I'm afraid all the nuances you mention in your post make it a little too complicated for my limited Western brain :-D , but I think I understood at least two important things:

1) the "azuma" in my shikona fits well with my interest in Hachiman God (I was actually not at all aware of that, I originally picked "azuma" as a sign of Tamanoi-beya - and especially Tochiazuma - fandom)

2) including "fern" in a shikona seems to be impossible... :'-( (not that it would have been very meaningful, no matter in what language; "fern" just happens to be the meaning of my last name in French)

Anyway, thanks again, and Azumaryu I will remain for now! :-P

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My question is why you are using 保("Ho") as you have ze-O-kage.  Is it a short "o" or long "o"?  If you want to make it more shikona like, instead of using 保, you may want to go with "王" (king) as in Kasugao or this more royal "皇" used by a rather well known sekitori but both are pronounced more like "ou" or long "o".   

I took another look at the long-o yomikata kanji and found a few that I liked the idea of without using "self-lifting" words like king or emperor. Do any of these make real sense (sumo/poetic) when used with the rest of the shikona? (It's just the middle kanji that changes.) What "image" do they portray? I guess using shadow makes it difficult.

是圧影

是鷹影

是旺影

是汪影

Accidentally found these (是擁影 and 是庇影)... could the romaji reading be "translated" into Zeokage? What ideas do these give out?

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My question is why you are using 保("Ho") as you have ze-O-kage.  Is it a short "o" or long "o"?  If you want to make it more shikona like, instead of using 保, you may want to go with "王" (king) as in Kasugao or this more royal "皇" used by a rather well known sekitori but both are pronounced more like "ou" or long "o".   

I took another look at the long-o yomikata kanji and found a few that I liked the idea of without using "self-lifting" words like king or emperor. Do any of these make real sense (sumo/poetic) when used with the rest of the shikona? (It's just the middle kanji that changes.) What "image" do they portray? I guess using shadow makes it difficult.

是圧影

是鷹影

是旺影

是汪影

Accidentally found these (是擁影 and 是庇影)... could the romaji reading be "translated" into Zeokage? What ideas do these give out?

I would read 是圧影 as Zeatsukage. ō is a reading for 圧 as well, but I really didn't know this. Among the next three I knew only 是旺影 which I like. For the meaning of 旺... well, it is definitely a positive one, take your pick between flourishing, successful, beautiful, vigorous and energetic.

As for 是擁影 and 是庇影, I would read those as Zeyōkage and Zehikage respectively.

Here are some more suitable kanji with ō as reading: 央 (center), 奥 (inner part), 往 (journey), 応 (respond), 押 (push), 横 (sideways) and 欧 (Europe).

I leave your question about the "image" or "idea" to the experts as I think only a native Japanese can truly understand this.

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I took another look at the long-o yomikata kanji and found a few that I liked the idea of without using "self-lifting" words like king or emperor. Do any of these make real sense (sumo/poetic) when used with the rest of the shikona? (It's just the middle kanji that changes.) What "image" do they portray? I guess using shadow makes it difficult.

是圧影  是鷹影  是旺影 是汪影

Accidentally found these (是擁影 and 是庇影)... could the romaji reading be "translated" into Zeokage? What ideas do these give out?

The character "是" means "affirmation" or "this".

Therefore, "是" hardly restricts the language which adheres after that.

The pronunciation is "ze" or "kore."

Kanji pronounced "ze" by 50% or more of probability does not exist in others.

「影」("kage" or "ei") is also the same.

It is possible to make the language which adds one character to these and is meaningful.

However, when the pronunciation of one character is restricted, it is almost impossible.

Therefore, after this, I advise only on that one character that enters in between.

"保" means "have" or "protect" or "maintain.

The pronunciation is "ho" or "bo".

"圧" means "push" "presses down" "crushe".

Although it can read with "ou", most things used by reading other than "atsu" cannot be found.

It must be the form of「圧す」("osu") in order to pronounce「圧」 to the sound of "o".

"押" with the same meaning as "圧" can be pronounced with "ou" by it one character.

"鷹" means "hawk".

This is also the same and most pronunciation of those other than "taka" or "yo:" is not used.

However, "是鷹影" is beautiful as a Kanji. And a meaning is also produced a little.

"旺" means "powerful" "encourage".

The pronunciation is only "ou".

"旺" is used also for the actual Shikona.

Therefore, although seemingly it is Shikona at first and is visible, if it sees repeatedly, it is visible like Chinese people's name.

"汪" means "large & deep" "many".

The pronunciation is only "ou".

"汪" hardly used in Japan.

"擁" means "hold" "protect".

The pronunciation is only "yo:".

"庇" means "protect" "console" "help "

The pronunciation is only "hi".

"御" means "the prefix showing polite mind"

The pronunciation is "o" "on" "go" "gyo" "mi".

"御影" means "Divine spirit".

The pronunciation is only "mikage".

"御影" used also for the name of a place in Japan.

"御影石" means "Granite".

The pronunciation is only "mikage-ishi".

Although "是御影" is beautiful as a name, it is pronounced with "kore-mikage."

"尾" means "Tail" "last".

The pronunciation is only "o".

"是尾影" is the easiest to be pronounced "zeokage".

However, it is enumeration of a mere Kanji.

In order to read even this correctly moreover, it is necessary to hear it at once.

My shikona is Susanoo(素戔嗚).

The Japanese who can read this correctly is only one person in 100 persons.

It is at most 50% which I open a telephone directory and can read correctly the name of those who do not know.

It is troubled in order that there may be no room of selection about the first "Ze" in your case.

Even if you use "self-lifting" words against will, it will be unchanging difficult.

A Kanji, especially a proper noun are not the things which can be read to anyone from the first so easily.

Please enjoy a Kanji combining your favorite word.

If the Kanji which is not suitable is contained there, I will meddle again. (Holiday feeling...)

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I found the kanji in my last post by looking up the yomikata at this site which was recommended to me on this forum.

According to the site (which could be incorrect) 是 can also mean justice, which is the meaning I was hoping would be conveyed. However it's probably the least known meaning.

I guess that finding a "se" yomikata kanji wouldn't work with the tenten as it would be the first kanji in the shikona, which is what makes this difficult.

The site also says that 保 can be read as just a short "o", but again that's probably the least used yomikata.

Besides the original 是保影 I chose a while ago (which I was hoping could be taken to mean something like "a protective shadow of justice"), the other one I liked most out of the shikona possibilities I posted above is 是旺影 which I hoped meant something like "a flourishing/powerful/encouraging shadow of justice".

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I would greatly appreciate if someone could guess a kanji for my shikona. Unfortunately, it is not even japanese related, so I understand it may be hard to find a good one.

Thanks in advance for the effort!  :-)

Please tell me the reading of "rodarvus" using the Roman alphabet which does not exclude a consonant.

onsonant.

rodarubasu?

hodarubasu?

rodarubyu?

roda:busu?

roddo-arubasu? (Holiday feeling...)

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I would greatly appreciate if someone could guess a kanji for my shikona. Unfortunately, it is not even japanese related, so I understand it may be hard to find a good one.

Thanks in advance for the effort!

Edited by rodarvus

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