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Tokimori

Shikona meanings

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Not much context needed, I think, it's just a pretty straight-forward reference to his region of origin I suppose, similarly to Bulgarian Kotooshu (Koto-Europe), or Wakanoyama (who's from Wakayama), or Iwakiyama (mount Iwaki being located in his home prefecture of Aomori). Although, knowing the trickery art of shikona, perhaps there's a second implied meaning in "Kokkai"...anybody know?

Now that this topic has been brought up again, as a quick aside, I've been noticing that it seems pretty common for people from strange places (either the boondocks of Japan or an unusual foreign country) to be named after where they're from. Kokkai, Kotooshu, and Wakanoyama are all examples already mentioned (not sure that Iwakiyama is worth mentioning here because Aomori is a fairly common birthplace), but other ones I've noticed lately include Kazafuzan (Kazakhstan), Kimu (Korea....Kim chee is kimuchi in Japanese, plus there's some kind of double entendre here...seems like every Korean rikishi starts with the name Kimu and then changes their name as they move up the ranks), Gokenzan (it's a mountain in Kagawa Ken, and he's the only rikishi in quite a while from that 'backwoods' part of Japan), and I'm pretty sure there's a few other recent ones (I feel like Sokokurai had something to do with the part of China he's from, but I'm not sure on that). In any case, just an observational thing I'm looking at, but the practice doesn't seem to be quite as xenophobic as I originally thought...

Yes, I think it's rather common practice actually and has been for a long time, even among the Japanese deshi, but probably more common for foreigners. Hoshiandesu from Argentina got his shikona from the Andes in SouthAmerica btw (the first I could think of you hadn't already mentioned).

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Hoshiandesu from Argentina got his shikona from the Andes in SouthAmerica btw (the first I could think of you hadn't already mentioned).

Not to mention Sentoryu named like the Japanese pronounciation of St. Louis, where he comes from.

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Kotoseiya Yuichi provided these kanji for one of our member's shikona:

Takanobaka (Noble Fool)

高の破家

I know that Fool (baka) is written differently. Ba is as in horse (I don't know how to produce kanji easily in this window) and Ka is as in deer. This is the way baka is commonly wirtten.

That is all for now,

Itachi

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I think the "Taka" is also wrong.

It should be the "Taka" used by Takanohana. The "Taka" here is used by Takamisakari and means "high" or "tall"

BTW, I remeber that sentoryu had a different shikona. what was it? Would it be a variation of "ka" commonly used in his tomozuna heya?

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BTW, is there a reason Jumonji's last name is commonly transcribed as "Jyumonji" unlike his shikona? The kanji is the same, isn't it?

In response to Asashosakari's comment, and also taking leaping off of Exil's earlier comment, Jumonji is written as Jyumonji because of different ways of transliterating Japanese into English script.

The first character, meaning 10 or a cross, is read as juu (that is, a macron over the 'u' to lengthen the sound). It is written in Japanese syllabary as 'ji' with a 'yu' sound to form 'ju' or sometimes written by a different English method of transliteration as 'jyu'. the sound is then lengthened by the addition of a 'u'.

In response to Exil's query [bTW, what is 'a ten sentence letter' (Jumonji)? ] the meaning of monji (also read as moji) means a written character or a letter of an alphabet. I mentioned above that the firt character can be read as meaning cross. Jumonji could be interpreted as 'character of the cross', or perhaps at a stretch, 'sign of the cross'. This has almost Biblical connotations.

Does anyone know if he or his family have a connection to Christianity?

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BTW, my shikona is a play on a species of rice. I'd always thought that it would make a good shikona and I now have a chance to use it!! ;-)

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Re: Jumonji

I believe that is his real name... Should check. I'm currently translating how-you-got-your-shikona bit of info for makuuchi rikishi from one of NHK magasines... I don't have the files here, so I can't even tell you for wich basho, but Musa was still active. I'll certainly share those with the Forum when finished!

Warning: clumsy translations due to insufficient knowledge of Japanese... ;-)

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BTW, I remeber that sentoryu had a different shikona. what was it? Would it be a variation of "ka" commonly used in his tomozuna heya?

Kaishinzan.

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Re: Jumonji

I believe that is his real name... Should check. I'm currently translating how-you-got-your-shikona bit of info for makuuchi rikishi from one of NHK magasines... I don't have the files here, so I can't even tell you for which basho, but Musa was still active. I'll certainly share those with the Forum when finished!

I think I read here somewhere in the past that his shikona came from the fact that his father invented the board game "Jumanji". I remember someone coming up with proof, as ridiculous as this sounds..

Was it me?

Yup:Here it is

Edited by Kintamayama

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(Sign of approval) Thanks for digging up that thread, it was an enjoyable re-read... (In a state of confusion...) :-S B-)

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Funny re-read, but not to take all the fun out of (what is probably a joke), a little research seems to indicate that Jumanji was created entirely out of Chris Van Allsburg's mind. Jumonji, however, was a character from the "Zatoichi" series (and thus probably was some sort of legendary samurai), so there might be a double entendre on his real name there....

Edit: It also appears that Jumonji was also an old poetic way for saying the number '10' coming from the 'character of the cross' translation since the number 10 in Japanese numerals looks like a cross. From this derivation, several other things have been named Jumonji due to theur crosslike shape, including the Jumonji gene and the Jumonji sword...

Edited by Takanobaka

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When I registered to Bench Sumo after Kyushu Basho 2002 the registration asked me to register a shikona, japanese sounding ones are common. Back then I new nothing about the meaning of shikonas or particles of them like Taka, Yama, or anything, so I browsed the net and found several pages with japanese vocabulary. One of the words I read there was "Yoma - Monster, Demon" so I thought cool, if that's no "fighting name" and it's short, too (Like Kaio (Going kyujo...) )

Well, learning more and more about Sumo and shikonas, I often thought about replacing it by a proper one but it kinda stuck.

Once a Gyoji translated it as "Red Dragon". ( :-P ) Does anyone know what Yoma really means? Unfortunately I don't have any japanese.

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Guest Mojo

Kotozakura (The 53th Yokozuna) is the master of Sadogatake beya, what does Kotozakura mean? and why do sumo from Sadogatake beya have similar names? e.g. Kotomitsuki, Kotonowaka and Kotoryu...

(Going kyujo...) :-P

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Koto is often translated as "Harp", although it's not quite the same thing - it is 13-string classical Japanese instrument: See here, for example.

Sakura/zakura is cherry, so Kotozakura would be Harp Cherry, not very spectacular name. :-P Some stablemasters like giving a part of their name to all their deshi, hence all Sadogatake rikishi have Kotozakura's "Koto" in their shikona. Similar case is also for Kokonoe-beya (Chiyo- of Chiyonofuji), partly in Takasago-beya (Asa- of Asashio) etc.

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Sakura/zakura is cherry, so Kotozakura would be Harp Cherry, not very spectacular name.
Edited by Exil

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Guest Mojo

Great link Exil!! (Going kyujo...) B-) (Sign of approval) :-P

Thanks for your replies to my question, Manekineko and Exil. (You are going off-topic...)

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Sakura/zakura is cherry, so Kotozakura would be Harp Cherry, not very spectacular name.  :-P Some stablemasters like giving a part of their name to all their deshi, hence all Sadogatake rikishi have Kotozakura's "Koto" in their shikona.

Did the Koto-custom in Sadogatake originate with Kotozakura?

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Guest Mojo

Does a rikishi choose his own shikona or does his master choose for him? :-P

What does Roho's shikona mean? In the case of the russian rikishi Roho from Otake beya? :-P

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All the information in this thread are great .......

i will try to gather as much as i can and keep a record of them.Thanks to all of you.......

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The Oyakata chooses the shikona, although in certain cases they'll allow the person to keep their real name until they reach a certain level, then bestow upon them a grander name once they reach a certain level.

I don't know Japanese worth a lick, but I think Cherry harp would be kotonozakura (or whatever the proper adjective qualifier would be there...)

I think Roho is another 'location' name, some kind of a play on Russia, but not 100% sure...

NOW I'm really coming off like a baka!

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Roho means Frost Condor and the "Ho", meaning "condor", came about because his old Oyakata Taiho, meaning "big condor". The "Ro" or "frost" was used because he is from Russia, and it is cold there.

Takatoriki has since taken over from Taiho so perhaps all new rikishi in Takatoriki's new heya will now employ the "toriki" shikona, meaning "fighting strength", in the future.

"No" is a preposition like "Of" and really doesnt have any intrinsic meaning. So I think kotozakura can be translated as harp cherry.

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Manekineko wrote:

Re: Jumonji

I believe that is his real name...

Yes, that is his real family name.

I don't know anything about the origins of that family name but it certainly would have preceded any manga and is rather unlikely to have any connection with Christianity although there is a long history of missionary influence in that part of Japan (particularly in Shingo-mura where there are burial mounds for Jesus and his brother Izukiri).

While on the topic of Jumonji, he used to go by the shikona Kaigatake where the kanji for kai was the same as the kanji for hashi in the name of his home town Hashikami-cho. In the second set of sumo cards released by baseball magazine sha in 1998, there was even a card for him with the shikona Kaigatake since he had been promoted to juryo in time for the publishing of that set of cards.

I remember all this because I was living in Hachinohe, the city of which Hashikami is a suburb, from 1997-1999 and that's when I became obsessed with all things sumo including collecting the complete set of the first set of bbmsha cards which became available in 1997. Sadly, I never bought any of the 1998 cards and I only know about the Kaigatake(Jumonji) card because a friend who worked in Hashikami had acquired that one and was very proud of his local rikishi.

By the way, under my personal data next to my last post, it says warn: 0%.

What does that mean? Why doesn't that appear next to anyone elses?

I seldom log in and usually lurk when I visit this forum. Is this why I am being warned?

Do I have some sort of virus that is spamming members? I don't understand.

Many thanks to those who are keeping this forum alive. If I had the time and money, I would gladly contribute but for now I can only sponge off the efforts of others.

Back to lurk mode perhaps,

Itachi (perhaps best known as Hoshitori Gyoji Wakatanuki in Bench Sumo where I am being pummeled by the sanyaku cyber-rikishi this tournament)

P.S. One last contribution, Yoma could also be translated as Westen Demon couldn't it? I assume that Yoma comes from the western world. That might be appropriate too.

P.P.S. If anyone out there is really knowledgeable about kanji, perhaps they could clarify for me the meaning of the Yo in Yotsukasa. Many dictionaries do not even include the reading for that shikona. I can't remember whether or not the kyokai site gives the proper kanji for it or leaves it as hiragana but that one character has always been the toughest one for me to research. It has the hi-hen, that is the fire radical on the left and the main body of it is ka as in hanahadashii, a character often used to describe things chinese if I'm not mistaken. Think of the ka in chuka-ryori to make that connection.

There, now I await your replies.

Jason 'Itachi' Russell

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Roho means Frost Condor and the "Ho", meaning "condor", came about because his old Oyakata Taiho, meaning "big condor". The "Ro" or "frost" was used because he is from Russia, and it is cold there.

Actuallythe 'ro' means dew (also read as tsuyu on its own), not frost. The character 'ro' does have a connection with his country of origin however. The 'ro' was used to signify the first syllable of the word 'roshia', which was the Japanized form of Russia.

Incidentally, the noun for frost is 'shimo', which is the first character of the current komusubi Shimotori's shikona. As others have noted, this is his real name and means 'frost bird' or 'bird of the frost'

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Itachi, dont worry about the warn meter. It was instituted to warn certain rule-breaker individual on this board. Everyone starts out with 0%, and you can only see your own "warn meter".

"Yo", is a rarely used character and I think means "glorious fire" or "beautiful fire."

The left radical does mean fire, but the right radical, although it could mean "chinese", in this instance, it means glorious. The Chinese actually took this character as their racial designation in order to signify the greatness of their civilization.

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