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Tokimori

Shikona meanings

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女蜘

Onnagumo. :-(

(I am not worthy...) Thank you, Kotoseiya-zeki! I think my shikona looks cool in kanji :-(

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Thank you very much, Exil!

You're most welcome. :-D

永山

My shikona (Nagayama, as pictured above, if I managed to type kanji) is a combination of the first kanji I ever learned (yama/san, mountain) and a kanji with my initials (ei/naga, eternal). The-mountain-you-can't-get-rid-of. :-(

Could someone use his/her magical powers to help me translate the following shikonas (my feeble attempts in parentheses :-():

Kitanoumi (North sea?), Mienoumi (sea of Mie?), Asahifuji (cold Fuji morning?), Futahaguro, Daiju, Raiden (thunder and lightning?).

I would be semi-eternally grateful. (I am not worthy...)

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Bored as I am, here are the kanji for few forum members' shikonas:

Some of them are probably incorrect as I really don't know Japanese at all.

Amanogawa (Milky Way)

天の川

Asashosakari (Blue Morning Summit)

朝青盛

Chiyozakura (Eternal Cherry Blossom)

千代桜

Doitsuyama (German Mountain)

独山

Fujisan (Mt. Fuji)

富士山

Furanohana (Flower of France)

仏の花

Hoshifransu (Star of France)

星仏

Iwagakki (Rocky Instrument)

磐楽器

Kaikitsune (Imperial Fox)

魁狐

Manekineko (Beckoning Cat)

招き猫

Megumishiki (Blessing Ceremony?)

恵み式

Nekonishiki (Cat Brocade)

猫錦

Takanobaka (Noble Fool)

高の破家

Takanorappa (Trumpet of Nobility)

高の喇叭

Tominishiki (Brocade of Wealth)

富錦

Zentoryu (Front Fighting Dragon)

前闘竜

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As there once was a real Sumotori named Chiyozakura I tried to built my name with other Kanji. For "Chi" there was the possibility of breast, which does not really suit me well :-S so I decided to leave the Chi as thousand and change the yo character. A long yo can mean "western", which would make my name something like "a thousand western cherry blossoms".

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I decided to leave the Chi as thousand and change the yo character. A long yo can mean "western", which would make my name something like "a thousand western cherry blossoms".
Wow..I think this is beautiful.. just as well as the one Kotoseiya showed! Very nice idea...
if I managed to type kanji) is a combination of the first kanji I ever learned (yama/san, mountain) and a kanji with my initials (ei/naga, eternal). The-mountain-you-can't-get-rid-of.
Or it could be "Monutain-that-prevails-eternally" :-) Very classy!
Kitanoumi (North sea?), Mienoumi (sea of Mie?), Asahifuji (cold Fuji morning?), Futahaguro, Daiju, Raiden (thunder and lightning?).
"Umi" in Kitanoumi is "lake" rather than the sea. So it's "North Lake". Mienoumi

is yes "sea of Mie" or "mie" means "triple", so it possibly be a picture of "tripled ( waves of ) sea". Futahaguro - actually this is a REAL BIG shikona, too big for that Kitao ( no I am not a very big Kitao fan ). Combination of Futa from Futabayama and -haguro from Haguroyma, both legendary great yokozuna. Kitao was very much ( too much ) expected to make as great a yokozuna as those two, but he never did. Futahaguro word-by-word means "double-feather-black". Daiju would be something like "big acceptance" and Raiden is "thunder - electricity ( quick as thunder and bright as electricity? :-D )"

女蜘 Onnagumo. 

Thank you, Kotoseiya-zeki! I think my shikona looks cool in kanji 

And knowing how it was named, it even looks cooler now! B-) Actually I thought it "feminine clouds" ... :-S

And how interesting to know the reasons behind the members' shikona! Thanks Kotoseiya, for starting this!

My shikona Amanogawa literally translates "the river of Heaven", which is "the Milky Way" in English. Well, call me naive and romantic. (Applauding...) But I thought it nice to dream a little when I am in the cyber world. And thought the last part "-gawa ( kawa, the river )" would hopefully give it a little real rikishi-like touch. Yoroshiku. :-)

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Bored as I am, here are the kanji for few forum members' shikonas:

Some of them are probably incorrect as I really don't know Japanese at all.

Amanogawa (Milky Way)

天の川

Asashosakari (Blue Morning Summit)

朝青盛

Chiyozakura (Eternal Cherry Blossom)

千代桜

Doitsuyama (German Mountain)

独山

Fujisan (Mt. Fuji)

富士山

Furanohana (Flower of France)

仏の花

Hoshifransu (Star of France)

星仏

Iwagakki (Rocky Instrument)

磐楽器

Kaikitsune (Imperial Fox)

魁狐

Manekineko (Beckoning Cat)

招き猫

Megumishiki (Blessing Ceremony?)

恵み式

Nekonishiki (Cat Brocade)

猫錦

Takanobaka (Noble Fool)

高の破家

Takanorappa (Trumpet of Nobility)

高の喇叭

Tominishiki (Brocade of Wealth)

富錦

Zentoryu (Front Fighting Dragon)

前闘竜

wow i don't now that tomi is a word in japanese thank you kotoseiya bow

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wow i don't now that tomi is a word in japanese thank you kotoseiya bow

There has even been a sekitori from Oguruma-beya called Tomikaze (Wind of Wealth?) few years ago. I think he fought in juryo in about 3-4 bashos. Does anyone know news about him? He had a heart attack few months ago, didn't he? :-S He seems to be ranked now at Ms50W.

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Usagi = "rabbit" or "hare"

Inspired by the outstanding comic "Usagi Yojimbo" telling the adventures of the Ronin (masterless samurai) Miyamoto Usagi in earl 17th century Japan. The series was originally inspired by the famous Miyamoto Musashi but it is more focused on fantasy.

The comic is written by Hawaiian Stan Sakai and is published by Dark Horse-Comics in the US. Sakai has promised a sumo-story once, but didn't show up with one by now. :(

[Deutsch bei "Carlsen-Comics" und "Schwarzer Turm"]

Edited by Usagi

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Usagi = "rabbit" or "hare"

Inspired by the outstanding comic "Usagi Yojimbo" telling the adventures of the Ronin (masterless samurai) Miyamoto Usagi in earl 17th century Japan. The series was originally inspired by the famous Miyamoto Musashi but it is more focused on fantasy.

The comic is written by Hawaiian Stan Sakai and is published by Dark Horse-Comics in the US. Sakai has promised a sumo-story once, but didn't show up with one by now. :(

[Deutsch bei "Carlsen-Comics" und "Schwarzer Turm"]

And me thinking it was to honor Sailor Moon - Tsukino Usagi. (Laughing...)

Since K'seiya-zeki translated my shikona, I have nothing more to add. I'll post my list later today, now I'm catching up with backlog of mail...

Usagi Yojimbo rocks.

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The list is a bit dated, but here you go. Ignore the &%# in brackets, it's kanji in EUC encoding, and I'm not sure if they'll go through OK...

First, sekitori:

Akebono [˝ě] = Dawn (Chad)

Akinoshima [

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Or it could be "Monutain-that-prevails-eternally"  :-)  Very classy!

Thank you. Mountain that prevails eternally... I kinda like that. B-)

Kitanoumi (North sea?), Mienoumi (sea of Mie?), Asahifuji (cold Fuji morning?), Futahaguro, Daiju, Raiden (thunder and lightning?).
"Umi" in Kitanoumi is "lake" rather than the sea. So it's "North Lake". Mienoumi

is yes "sea of Mie" or "mie" means "triple", so it possibly be a picture of "tripled ( waves of ) sea". Futahaguro - actually this is a REAL BIG shikona, too big for that Kitao ( no I am not a very big Kitao fan ). Combination of Futa from Futabayama and -haguro from Haguroyma, both legendary great yokozuna. Kitao was very much ( too much ) expected to make as great a yokozuna as those two, but he never did. Futahaguro word-by-word means "double-feather-black". Daiju would be something like "big acceptance" and Raiden is "thunder - electricity ( quick as thunder and bright as electricity? :-D )"

Thanks for the translations. :-S I can't imagine why anyone would be a Kitao fan. The contrast between Kitao's sumo career and his later shikona is incredibly ironic.

My shikona Amanogawa literally translates "the river of Heaven", which is "the Milky Way" in English.  Well,  call me naive and romantic.  (Applauding...)  But I thought it nice to dream a little when I am in the cyber world. And thought the last part "-gawa ( kawa, the river )" would hopefully give it a little real rikishi-like touch.  Yoroshiku. :-)

Somehow I knew that... Ah, must be this: "Waga hoshi wa doko ni tabine ya ama-no-gawa." Nice shikona. (Dripping sweat...)

Usagi = "rabbit" or "hare"

Inspired by the outstanding comic "Usagi Yojimbo" telling the adventures of the Ronin (masterless samurai) Miyamoto Usagi in earl 17th century Japan. The series was originally inspired by the famous Miyamoto Musashi but it is more focused on fantasy.

And I thought of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles... (Punk rocker...)

Huge thanks to Manekineko-zeki for the translations. :-D

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Mines meant to be as it sounds rather than an English translation.

"Fuji-san" or "Son of Fuji"-----Fuji in this case being Chiyonofuji the wolf.

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Takanobaka (Noble Fool)

高の破家

Personally, I prefer Exalted Moron.... (Enjoying a beer...) (I am with smart...)

I think the rationale behind the name is pretty self-expalantory, but during my time in Japan I seemed to pick up baka as an unofficial nickname....

One other Shikona I know (just for spits and giggles) is that Kokkai is the Japanese name for the Black Sea, the region where Republic of Georgia is located. Not too sure of the context, but it can't be half as bad as when every Native American baseball player was nicknamed "Chief"...

Edited by Takanobaka

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One other Shikona I know (just for spits and giggles) is that Kokkai is the Japanese name for the Black Sea, the region where Republic of Georgia is located. Not too sure of the context, but it can't be half as bad as when every Native American baseball player was nicknamed "Chief"...

Not much context needed, I think, it's just a pretty straight-forward reference to his region of origin I suppose, similarly to Bulgarian Kotooshu (Koto-Europe), or Wakanoyama (who's from Wakayama), or Iwakiyama (mount Iwaki being located in his home prefecture of Aomori). Although, knowing the trickery art of shikona, perhaps there's a second implied meaning in "Kokkai"...anybody know?

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Guest Megumishiki

B-)

Thanks to Kotoseiya-san's boredom I got to see my shikona in kanji. it does look cool... the first part is what my japanese name my mother liked for me...the "shiki" part i got from the "nishiki" (from Ami's, who else?). had to shorten it as Meguminishiki sounds so long.

Speaking of Ami...i'm surprised (but glad) the meaning for his first kanji is "relaxed". whenever it was translated in Babelfish it comes out as "cheaply"... like "cheaply beauty brocade"...

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Of course a Rikishi nickname often has little to do with the English translation of their shikona-

Like Chiyonofujis Wolf nickname-

When I started watching sumo on Channel 4 in the late 1980s the rikishi where referred to by their nicknames and not their Shikonas-

Yokozuna-

Chiyonofuji-The Wolf

Onokuni-The Giant panda

Hokutoumi-The Bulldog

Ozeki-

Hokutenryu-The Polar bear

Asahifuji-The Sea slug

Konishiki-The Dump Truck

Others-

Akinoshima-Killer whale.

Tochinowaka-The Great oak

Mitzoizuma-The salt shaker(what else?)

Kirishima-The Fog

Kotogaume-The Plum

Terao-The Typhoon

Kotonishki-The lute

Some are based on the names and some have nothing to do with it-

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Not much context needed, I think, it's just a pretty straight-forward reference to his region of origin I suppose, similarly to Bulgarian Kotooshu (Koto-Europe), or Wakanoyama (who's from Wakayama), or Iwakiyama (mount Iwaki being located in his home prefecture of Aomori). Although, knowing the trickery art of shikona, perhaps there's a second implied meaning in "Kokkai"...anybody know?

Now that this topic has been brought up again, as a quick aside, I've been noticing that it seems pretty common for people from strange places (either the boondocks of Japan or an unusual foreign country) to be named after where they're from. Kokkai, Kotooshu, and Wakanoyama are all examples already mentioned (not sure that Iwakiyama is worth mentioning here because Aomori is a fairly common birthplace), but other ones I've noticed lately include Kazafuzan (Kazakhstan), Kimu (Korea....Kim chee is kimuchi in Japanese, plus there's some kind of double entendre here...seems like every Korean rikishi starts with the name Kimu and then changes their name as they move up the ranks), Gokenzan (it's a mountain in Kagawa Ken, and he's the only rikishi in quite a while from that 'backwoods' part of Japan), and I'm pretty sure there's a few other recent ones (I feel like Sokokurai had something to do with the part of China he's from, but I'm not sure on that). In any case, just an observational thing I'm looking at, but the practice doesn't seem to be quite as xenophobic as I originally thought...

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Kimu (Korea....Kim chee is kimuchi in Japanese, plus there's some kind of double entendre here...seems like every Korean rikishi starts with the name Kimu and then changes their name as they move up the ranks)

;-) Well, I guess it's possible that it's a practical joke by the Oyakata to name all Korean shin-deshi "Kimu", but the explanation is probably easier than that. Kim is a pretty common last name in Korea, so Kimu is most likely the equivalent to the Japanese deshi who compete under their own last name until they get a "real" shikona. The alternate meaning as a reference to Korea probably doesn't hurt either.

Thanks for the background on Gokenzan's shikona btw, I didn't know that. :-D

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