Asashosakari

Heisei Hopefuls - prospect watch

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Tier 4:

Iwasaki didn't (ahem) monkey around this time and secured his juryo debut in his third opportunity, doing it in style with 6 wins, although he did miss out on the makushita yusho against ultra-veteran Oiwato somewhat surprisingly.

Long-time prospect Daiseido, who has been in the third division ever since Haru 2012, had another of his periodic strong tournaments and has now gone KK in 6 of his last 7 basho (albeit after dropping way down first), but he has teased breakouts multiple times before and at this point I'm rather wary of declaring that this is the time he's finally going to make it. He's set to get the opportunity though with the second top 5 appearance of his career, following Hatsu 2015.

In other news, Kotodaigo and Chiyonoumi had halfway notable 4-3 scores as both continue to work their way back to the heights they had reached a couple of years ago, pre-injuries. The rest of the Natsu results fell into the "the less said, the better" category here.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Natsu 2017 - Tier 4: Last Chance Saloon - Ms15+ Age 25 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.07 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05
Iwasaki Oitekaze 1992/04/24 (60) 2015.01 Ms2 Ms10w 4-3 Ms7w 5-2 Ms3e 2-5 Ms10e 6-1 Ms3e 4-3 Ms2w 6-1
Daiseido Kise 1992/12/30 (56) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms36e 4-3 Ms28e 4-3 Ms22e 5-2 Ms11w 3-4 Ms18e 5-2 Ms11e 6-1
Irodori Shikoroyama 1992/03/10 (62) 2007.03 Ms8 Ms17w 4-3 Ms14w 5-2 Ms8e 3-4 Ms12e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2 Ms12w 2-5
Sasakiyama Kise 1991/06/12 (65) 2010.01 Ms13 Ms42w 4-3 Ms34e 3-4 Ms45w 4-3 Ms36e 4-3 Ms31e 6-1 Ms13e 1-6
Tochimaru Kasugano 1992/08/26 (58) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms18e 5-2 Ms9w 5-2 Ms4w 4-3 Ms3w 3-4 Ms7e 2-5 Ms16e 2-5
Kotodaigo Sadogatake 1993/01/14 (54) 2011.05 Ms8 Ms28e 2-5 Ms48w 2-5 Sd10w 6-1 Ms34e 5-2 Ms21w 4-3 Ms16w 4-3
Chiyonoumi Kokonoe 1993/01/11 (55) 2015.05 Ms13 Sd33w 0-0-7 Sd94e 6-1 Sd36e 5-2 Sd7e 6-1 Ms32e 4-3 Ms26w 4-3
Shiba Kise 1991/12/24 (64) 2014.03 Ms3 Ms28w 6-1 Ms11e 4-3 Ms8w 5-2 Ms5e 3-4 Ms8w 1-6 Ms28e 5-2
Akinohana Takadagawa 1992/11/30 (57) 2008.03 Ms6 Ms11e 3-4 Ms16e 4-3 Ms10w 1-6 Ms31w 3-4 Ms43w 4-3 Ms37e 4-3
Wakatakamoto Arashio 1991/12/29 (63) 2009.11 Ms11 Ms14w 4-3 Ms11w 1-2-4 Ms30w 0-0-7 Sd10w 5-2 Ms48e 4-3 Ms39e 3-4
Ayanoumi Yamahibiki 1992/03/23 (61) 2007.03 Ms14 Ms51w 4-3 Ms44w 3-4 Ms55e 5-2 Ms37e 4-3 Ms33w 1-6 Sd5w 4-3
Wakayama Onomatsu 1992/04/26 (59) 2011.07 Ms15 Jd91w 0-0-7 Jk25e 0-0-7 Mz 3-0 Jk16w 6-1 Y Jd32e 7-0 Y Sd32e 4-3


With his 26th birthday the end of the prospect road has come for Sasakiyama, a former top high schooler who impressed with a quick early rise to makushita, but never quite caught on afterwards and has spent the majority of his time in the lower half of the division. He originally made his debut back in Hatsu 2010 alongside high school circuit rival Masunoumi who was highly touted at the time as well, but didn't make it either and already retired a year and a half ago (still arguably with more upside than Sasakiyama demonstrated before or since).

No newcomers for Nagoya here except the pair coming down from Tier 3.

 

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The lineups for Nagoya 2017:

Tier 1 (Q) - Can Kotokamatani achieve back-to-back KKs in makushita for the first time?

Tier 2 (Q) - Last basho's star performer Kiribayama received a smaller than expected promotion, but he does compete at a new career-high rank this time as he tries to advance further towards juryo. His fellow 6-1's Nakazono, Gokushindo and Hamayutaka did make sizable jumps and it'll be interesting to see how they cope.

Tier 3 (Q) - Hakuyozan and Masunosho have reached the promotion zone, the latter for the first time. Meanwhile, last basho's makushita tsukedashi pair Yago and Mitoryu will have their sophomore efforts following their rather divergent debut results, while the recent sandanme starters Murata and Wakatakakage have moved up to makushita.

Tier 4 (Q) - After two and a half years, Daiseido has exactly equalled his previous high rank of Ms3e. Will this push up the rankings be more successful for the former top prospect?

Edited by Asashosakari
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Slowly getting started here...

On ‎27‎.‎06‎.‎2017 at 22:43, Asashosakari said:

Tier 1 (Q) - Can Kotokamatani achieve back-to-back KKs in makushita for the first time?

And the answer is: Nope, not yet. It's always tricky to generalize from just one basho's matches, but rewatching his Nagoya bouts just now I was struck by the fact that his makushita-level opponents mostly seemed to manage to control him with superior strength. That seems hard to believe given his physique, even conceding that he's still just 19, so I wonder if he wasn't in top condition for this one.

Either way, Kotokamatani's going to yield the top spot here as two others produced kachikoshi records. Kirinoryu had a fine makushita debut and finished 4-3, while Shonannoumi bounced back convincingly from his Natsu 1-6 and picked up 6 wins this time. He should be the top-ranked Tier 1 rikishi in September, albeit without setting a new high rank mark for himself.

Yokuyusei was absent for the basho - anyone happen to hear what's up?
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Nagoya 2017 - Tier 1: Top Talents - current yardstick: Takagenji (1997/05/13, debut 2013.03, shin-juryo 2017.05)
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Kotokamatani Sadogatake 1997/11/19 (3) 2015.11 Ms36 Ms59w 5-2 Ms43e 3-4 Ms50e 3-4 Sd3w 5-2 Ms46e 4-3 Ms36w 2-5
Kirinoryu Michinoku 1997/06/13 (4) 2013.03 Ms60 Sd71w 4-3 Sd51w 4-3 Sd31w 3-4 Sd50e 5-2 Sd24e 5-2 Ms60e 4-3
Shonannoumi Takadagawa 1998/04/08 (2) 2014.03 Ms40 Sd8w 4-3 Ms59e 4-3 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40e 3-4 Ms48e 1-6 Sd23e 6-1
Yokuyusei Shibatayama 1998/09/10 (1) 2014.03 Ms58 Sd68e 3-4 Sd78w 5-2 Sd44w 5-2 Sd21w 5-2 Ms58e 2-5 Sd26w 0-0-7


No newcomers here for Aki basho, although it looks like we may be getting fresh blood soon: Sandanme yusho contender Ryuko looked like he's got what it takes to keep moving up further. With some banzuke luck he may only need 4 wins to secure his makushita debut next time, otherwise 5 will do it. Even younger talent Inoue will definitely be only a 4-3 away again.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 2:

Not much in the way of good news to report here. Kiribayama started the basho off with a 3-1 record but then proceeded to fall to 3-4, and he wasn't particularly close to winning any of the three second-week bouts. Gokushindo and Hamayutaka had also made sizable jumps off 6-1's to reach new career-high positions and went makekoshi this time as well, while Nakazono was even forced to sit out completely with a meniscus injury.

All in all only three of the 13 makushita-ranked members of this section ended up with KK records, and only Oki was ranked high enough for it that it'll result in a new best-ever ranking for September.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Nagoya 2017 - Tier 2: Promising Youngsters - Age 21 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Kiribayama Michinoku 1996/04/24 (13) 2015.05 Ms10 Sd11e 6-1 Ms35e 5-2 Ms20e 5-2 Ms12w 3-4 Ms18e 6-1 Ms10e 3-4
Nakazono Nishonoseki 1996/05/18 (12) 2012.03 Ms11 Sd12e 2-5 Sd40e 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 6-1 Ms29e 6-1 Ms11w 0-0-7
Kotaro Fujishima 1995/12/06 (16) 2014.01 Ms14 Ms28w 4-3 Ms23e 3-4 Ms29e 4-3 Ms25w 4-3 Ms19w 4-3 Ms15w 2-5
Gokushindo Nishikido 1996/06/06 (11) 2012.03 Ms16 Ms57w 4-3 Ms51e 3-4 Ms58w 3-4 Sd13w 6-1 Ms38e 6-1 Ms16e 2-5
Hamayutaka Tokitsukaze 1995/11/17 (17) 2011.05 Ms17 Sd22w 5-2 Ms59w 3-4 Sd11w 5-2 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40w 6-1 Ms17e 3-4
Takayoshitoshi Takanohana 1997/05/13 (5) 2013.03 Ms11 Ms24w 2-5 Ms39e 4-3 Ms30w 6-1 Ms11e 2-5 Ms25e 4-3 Ms21e 4-3
Takakento Takanohana 1996/02/10 (14) 2014.01 Ms26 Ms46w 4-3 Ms36e 2-5 Ms52e 3-4 Sd8e 4-3 Ms59e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4
Ohata Tokitsukaze 1996/10/24 (7) 2014.11 Ms40 Sd52w 4-3 Sd34w 3-4 Sd48e 4-3 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 4-3 Ms40e 2-5
Kaito Asakayama 1996/06/19 (9) 2012.05 Ms20 Ms58e 6-1 Ms27w 4-3 Ms22e 3-4 Ms32w 5-2 Ms20e 2-5 Ms42w 5-2
Oki Shikoroyama 1996/06/12 (10) 2013.07 Ms42 Sd7w 2-5 Sd32e 6-1 Ms49e 4-3 Ms42w 3-4 Ms54w 4-3 Ms43w 4-3
Midorifuji Isegahama 1996/08/30 (8) 2016.09 Ms46 Mz 3-0 Jk21w 7-0 D Jd10w 7-0 D Sd19w 5-2 Ms57w 4-3 Ms46w 3-4
Honda Nishikido 1997/03/11 (6) 2012.03 Ms52 Sd57w 5-2 Sd28e 5-2 Sd3e 4-3 Ms52w 2-5 Sd17w 5-2 Ms54e 2-5
Tamakongo Kataonami 1995/09/19 (19) 2014.03 Ms25 Sd27e 3-4 Sd46w 5-2 Sd16e 3-4 Sd35w 7-0 Y Ms25w 0-7 Ms60w 1-6
Shuji Kise 1995/10/24 (18) 2014.03 Ms54 Jd12e 7-0 Y Sd20w 2-5 Sd41w 6-1 Ms54w 1-5-1 Sd23e 3-4 Sd46e 4-3
Onojo Takadagawa 1996/01/31 (15) 2011.05 Ms60 Sd28w 4-3 Sd14w 4-3 Sd3w 0-7 Sd53w 5-2 Sd27e 3-4 Sd48e 3-4

Kiribayama may just barely hang on to a top 15 ranking and Takayoshitoshi might sneak in, otherwise we won't have any makushita-joi presence here next time.


One new entrant will be joining Tier 2 for Aki basho:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Yamatoarashi Shikoroyama 1996/05/11 2012.03 Sd7 Sd30w 4-3 Sd18e 4-3 Sd7w 2-5 Sd33e 4-3 Sd18w 4-3 Sd7e 5-2

I actually vaguely remember Yamatoarashi (then still Fujita) from his starting days back in 2012 when we still enjoyed full-day video coverage - blessed physique with 190 cm in height and decent weight and strength, but very little innate sumo sense and consequently he didn't nearly have the level of early success one might expect from somebody with those physical attributes. Two and a half years into his career an injury put him out of action for six months and back to a restart in maezumo, and since then he has enjoyed slow but steady progress up the ranks, now culminating in his makushita debut. We only have video of two recent bouts, but based on those I'd still call his footwork pretty iffy, though he must obviously have enough control of it to enable his strongly tsuki-oshi focussed sumo to work at the upper sandanme level. (>70% wins with those technique groups, most of the rest being slapdowns.) 

Makushita-quality rikishi tend to be competent at holding their ground under attack, so it remains to be seen if Yamatoarashi will be able to push and thrust his way to further advancement, or if they'll manage to exploit the technical holes in his sumo. I'm a bit doubtful about his near-term progress for now.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 3:

A bit of an unexpected promotion out of this tier thanks to Natsu basho's MsTd starter Yago who followed up on his 5-2 debut with the zensho yusho to clinch his ticket for juryo. Congrats!

As for our other high-ranking members:

Masunosho produced his third straight basho in which he went from 2-3 to 4-3, scoring his first kachikoshi in the top 5 ranks in the process, so September will be his first really major opportunity to earn promotion to the sekitori ranks; he should be ranked either Ms2 or Ms3 where another 4-win record might be good enough. Hakuyozan was back in the promotion zone for the first time in a year, but unfortunately fell to makekoshi early at 1-4 and had to salvage a 3-4 score in the end. Tsurubayashi and Takemasa held the two Ms8 spots in July, both reaching a new career-best mark with that, but suffered heavy losses and finished only 1-6 and 2-5. Our last top 15 ranker Wakamotoharu wasn't able to arrest his slide, picked up his 3rd consecutive 3-4 result, and will fall back further.

Other records of interest were provided by the other makushita tsukedashi Mitoryu who bounced back from his debut MK with 5 wins this time, still-fresh Mongolian talent Asahiryu who appears to have found his level in the middle of the division for now and went 3-4, and the recent SdTd's Murata and Wakatakakage who successfully followed up on their May 7-0's with strong records in mid-makushita, with the former going 5-2 and the latter even 6-1. Another 6-1 score was achieved by Kotokuzan who will be returning to near his career-high ranking for Aki basho (possibly even setting a new mark).
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Nagoya 2017 - Tier 3: Still Worth Watching - Age 23 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Hakuyozan Takadagawa 1995/04/13 (22) 2011.05 Ms1 Ms27e 4-3 Ms20w 4-3 Ms14e 4-3 Ms11w 5-2 Ms7w 5-2 Ms4e 3-4
Masunosho Chiganoura 1994/11/14 (27) 2010.03 Ms5 Ms13w 5-2 Ms6e 2-5 Ms15e 5-2 Ms8e 4-3 Ms6w 4-3 Ms5e 4-3
Tsurubayashi Kise 1993/12/31 (44) 2009.03 Ms8 Ms39w 5-2 Ms28e 5-2 Ms18e 4-3 Ms14w 4-3 Ms12e 5-2 Ms8e 1-6
Takemasa Onomatsu 1993/10/22 (46) 2016.03 Ms8 Sd92e 6-1 Sd33w 4-3 Sd16w 7-0 Y Ms13e 4-3 Ms10w 4-3 Ms8w 2-5
Yago Oguruma 1994/07/08 (34) 2017.05 Ms11         Ms15Td 5-2 Ms11e 7-0 Y
Wakamotoharu Arashio 1993/10/05 (47) 2011.11 Ms5 Ms16w 4-3 Ms12w 4-3 Ms8e 4-3 Ms5w 3-4 Ms9w 3-4 Ms14e 3-4
Mitoryu Nishikido 1994/04/25 (38) 2017.05 Ms15         Ms15Td 3-4 Ms23w 5-2
Asahiryu Asahiyama 1995/04/22 (21) 2016.05 Ms23 Jd45e 6-1 Sd79w 7-0 D Ms51e 6-1 Ms23e 3-4 Ms31w 4-3 Ms24e 3-4
Murata Takasago 1994/08/08 (32) 2017.03 Ms27       Sd100Td 6-1 Sd39e 7-0 D Ms27e 5-2
Rikito Tokitsukaze 1993/09/21 (48) 2011.09 Ms19 Ms19e 2-5 Ms32e 3-4 Ms38w 4-3 Ms34w 2-5 Sd1e 6-1 Ms30e 0-7
Hokutokawa Hakkaku 1994/08/15 (31) 2013.03 Ms31 Sd5e 3-4 Sd19w 5-2 Ms55e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms46w 5-2 Ms31e 3-4
Tochiseiryu Kasugano 1995/04/26 (20) 2014.03 Ms33 Ms54w 4-3 Ms47e 2-5 Sd4w 3-4 Sd24w 4-3 Sd11e 6-1 Ms35e 4-3
Wakatakakage Arashio 1994/12/06 (25) 2017.03 Ms38       Sd100Td 5-2 Sd63w 7-0 Y Ms38w 6-1
Hatooka Kise 1994/02/23 (42) 2016.03 Ms30 Sd70w 6-1 Sd15e 5-2 Ms50w 5-2 Ms36e 4-3 Ms30e 3-4 Ms41w 4-3
Ichiki Tamanoi 1993/11/13 (45) 2016.01 Ms16 Sd14e 5-2 Ms53w 6-1 Ms24w 5-2 Ms16w 3-4 Ms23w 2-5 Ms44e 2-5
Yutakasho Sakaigawa 1994/11/19 (26) 2013.03 Ms49 Sd20w 0-0-7 Sd81e 6-1 Sd23w 4-3 Sd12w 3-4 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 2-5
Nishiyama Onoe 1994/04/27 (37) 2010.03 Ms22 Sd14w 5-2 Ms54e 3-4 Sd2e 3-4 Sd17w 4-3 Ms60w 4-3 Ms50e 3-4
Hokutoshu Hakkaku 1994/01/14 (43) 2012.03 Ms50 Sd31w 5-2 Sd5w 4-3 Ms55w 2-5 Sd16e 4-3 Sd4w 4-3 Ms54w 4-3
Kaiseio Asakayama 1995/01/28 (23) 2013.03 Ms18 Ms18w 2-5 Ms31e 0-7 Sd6w 5-2 Ms46w 5-2 Ms35w 2-5 Ms55w 5-2
Kotohayato Sadogatake 1994/04/18 (39) 2010.03 Ms48 Sd11w 4-3 Ms60w 3-4 Sd12w 3-4 Sd31w 6-1 Ms48w 3-4 Ms58e 3-4
Kotokuzan Arashio 1994/03/11 (41) 2009.09 Ms28 Sd9e 6-1 Ms34w 4-3 Ms28w 2-5 Ms50e 5-2 Ms37w 2-5 Ms59e 6-1
Fukamiyama Onoe 1994/11/12 (28) 2010.03 Ms47 Sd4e 5-2 Ms49e 3-4 Ms56w 4-3 Ms47e 2-5 Sd12e 4-3 Sd1w 3-4
Kaizen Asakayama 1993/07/29 (51) 2016.01 Ms57 Sd36w 2-5 Sd62e 6-1 Sd8e 4-3 Ms57e 3-4 Sd12w 4-3 Sd2e 4-3
Tochinobori Kasugano 1993/09/01 (49) 2009.03 Ms12 Ms41w 4-3 Ms31w 4-3 Ms26e 4-3 Ms22e 3-4 Ms31e 0-2-5 Sd6w 4-3
Shinohara Onomatsu 1993/08/21 (50) 2012.01 Ms28 Ms53e 2-5 Sd16e 3-4 Sd30e 5-2 Sd6e 2-5 Sd34e 5-2 Sd8e 4-3
Kotonoshu Sadogatake 1994/07/01 (35) 2010.03 Ms53 Sd16w 3-4 Sd31e 4-3 Sd14w 4-3 Sd4e 1-5-1 Sd40w 5-2 Sd15e 3-1-3
Kirinofuji Michinoku 1994/07/28 (33) 2011.01 Ms52 Sd1w 2-5 Sd24e 5-2 Ms59e 3-4 Sd14w 2-5 Sd44e 5-2 Sd17e 3-4
Musashikuni Musashigawa 1994/12/17 (24) 2013.07 Ms26 Ms26e 2-5 Ms43w 2-5 Ms59w 5-2 Ms41w 3-4 Ms53e 2-5 Sd21w 4-3
Itadaki Isenoumi 1994/09/05 (30) 2010.03 Ms56 Sd64w 4-3 Sd46e 4-3 Sd29w 4-3 Sd16w 5-2 Ms56w 2-5 Sd23w 5-2
Aomihama Dewanoumi 1994/10/27 (29) 2010.03 Ms49 Sd31e 3-4 Sd50w 3-4 Sd61e 6-1 Sd7e 4-3 Ms57e 2-5 Sd24w 5-2
Chiyonokatsu Kokonoe 1994/04/13 (40) 2013.03 Ms57 Sd28e 3-4 Sd48e 6-1 Ms57e 2-5 Sd22w 4-3 Sd8w 2-5 Sd38e 5-2
Baraki Shikihide 1994/05/10 (36) 2013.01 Ms58 Sd63e 4-3 Sd44e 4-3 Sd25e 3-4 Sd45e 3-4 Sd65w 3-4 Sd84w 5-2

The 24th birthday has beckoned for Kaizen and Shinohara which means they have exhausted their eligibility for Tier 3. Kaizen is still relatively new on the scene, but his struggling just to post 4 wins in upper sandanme is not a great sign, while Shinohara has already spent more than a dozen tournaments in makushita but has yet to KK above Ms48 and has been mired in sandanme for the last year. I would be surprised if either will be seen above Ms15 in the next couple of years to requalify for Tier 4, let alone wear a kesho-mawashi in the future.


One new face will be joining us:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Ichiyamamoto Nishonoseki 1993/10/01 2017.01 Sd49     Mz 3-0 Jk15e 7-0 Y Jd10e 6-1 Sd49e 6-1

And here's the problem (as far as this thread goes) with rikishi who are eligible for professional sumo under the new rules allowing over-22's to join: They're just not very prospect-worthy unless they immediately race through to the top of makushita. Chuo university product Ichiyamamoto already turns 24 after Aki basho and short of a 7-0 debut in makushita it'll mean his time in Tier 3 will be over after just that one tournament. Will he be good enough to re-appear in Tier 4 as a makushita-joi later on? I honestly have no idea, though last 16 at the student national championships (as a senior-year student in 2015) plus last 16 at last year's Kokutai (representing Hokkaido prefecture) seems a little bit short of can't-miss qualifications. As usual, the 19-2 career-starting record alone doesn't mean much. There's no video of him from Nagoya basho, but if you're so inclined you can watch quite a bit of coverage by One And Only from Haru and Natsu.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 4:

What a difference six months can make. Back after his January 3-4 it looked like Daiseido's latest revival might end up as just the next part of the ups and downs that have characterized his career for the last five years. 16 wins and 5 losses later he's going to juryo. Well done! It remains to be seen if the 24-year-old can truly establish himself as a sekitori or if he'll just continue to bounce around at a higher level than before, but even after half a decade in makushita he's certainly still young enough for a lengthy sekitori career.

Two others may have laid the groundwork to follow him soon. Kizaki ran his KK streak to 8 basho with a 5-2 and he will be making his first appearance in the promotion zone next time. And so will Kotodaigo who's on a 5-KK streak of his own after his 6-1 Nagoya score as it looks like he's finally back to the promising form he showed more than two years ago before getting injured.

The rest of this section produced entirely unspectacular results with Tochimaru's 5-2 from a fairly low rank the biggest highlight in the lot, and again none of them will be ranked inside the makushita-joi for Aki basho.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Nagoya 2017 - Tier 4: Last Chance Saloon - Ms15+ Age 25 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.09 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07
Daiseido Kise 1992/12/30 (56) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms28e 4-3 Ms22e 5-2 Ms11w 3-4 Ms18e 5-2 Ms11e 6-1 Ms3e 5-2
Kizaki Kise 1993/05/06 (53) 2016.03 Ms7 Sd39w 7-0 Y Ms26e 4-3 Ms21e 5-2 Ms13w 5-2 Ms9e 4-3 Ms7e 5-2
Kotodaigo Sadogatake 1993/01/14 (54) 2011.05 Ms8 Ms48w 2-5 Sd10w 6-1 Ms34e 5-2 Ms21w 4-3 Ms16w 4-3 Ms13w 6-1
Shiba Kise 1991/12/24 (63) 2014.03 Ms3 Ms11e 4-3 Ms8w 5-2 Ms5e 3-4 Ms8w 1-6 Ms28e 5-2 Ms19e 3-4
Chiyonoumi Kokonoe 1993/01/11 (55) 2015.05 Ms13 Sd94e 6-1 Sd36e 5-2 Sd7e 6-1 Ms32e 4-3 Ms26w 4-3 Ms22e 2-5
Irodori Shikoroyama 1992/03/10 (61) 2007.03 Ms8 Ms14w 5-2 Ms8e 3-4 Ms12e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2 Ms12w 2-5 Ms29e 3-4
Tamaki Takasago 1993/05/29 (52) 2016.01 Ms10 Ms41e 6-1 Ms17e 4-3 Ms10w 3-4 Ms15e 3-4 Ms20w 3-4 Ms30w 4-3
Akinohana Takadagawa 1992/11/30 (57) 2008.03 Ms6 Ms16e 4-3 Ms10w 1-6 Ms31w 3-4 Ms43w 4-3 Ms37e 4-3 Ms31w 4-3
Tochimaru Kasugano 1992/08/26 (58) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms9w 5-2 Ms4w 4-3 Ms3w 3-4 Ms7e 2-5 Ms16e 2-5 Ms32e 5-2
Wakatakamoto Arashio 1991/12/29 (62) 2009.11 Ms11 Ms11w 1-2-4 Ms30w 0-0-7 Sd10w 5-2 Ms48e 4-3 Ms39e 3-4 Ms49e 4-3
Ayanoumi Yamahibiki 1992/03/23 (60) 2007.03 Ms14 Ms44w 3-4 Ms55e 5-2 Ms37e 4-3 Ms33w 1-6 Sd5w 4-3 Ms56e 3-4
Wakayama Onomatsu 1992/04/26 (59) 2011.07 Ms15 Jk25e 0-0-7 Mz 3-0 Jk16w 6-1 Y Jd32e 7-0 Y Sd32e 4-3 Sd16e 3-4


No upcoming new entrants here.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Question: Why is Takayoshitoshi in Tier 2 instead of Tier 1? Is it because he is the "older" twin?

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On 3.8.2017 at 22:44, Bumpkin said:

Question: Why is Takayoshitoshi in Tier 2 instead of Tier 1? Is it because he is the "older" twin?

Yes.
 

The lineups for Aki 2017:

Tier 1 (Q) - Shonannoumi is the top-ranked Tier 1 rikishi for the first time in his 6th appearance, but he's coming off a big 6-1 jump after earlier setbacks - can he maintain the momentum against higher-grade opposition?

Tier 2 (Q) - No immediate contenders for promotion here, as has become the norm in Tier 2 of late. (We haven't had anybody ranked higher than Ms10 since Kyushu.) Kiribayama remains the arguably biggest prospect, despite last basho's unfortunate 3-4 finish from 3-1, and it'll be interesting to see if he can bounce back strongly. Also worth watching this time: Oki, who's at a career-high rank and has had 4 KK in his last 5 tournaments, and makushita newcomer Yamatoarashi.

Tier 3 (Q) - Masunosho managed to KK in his first appearance in the promotion zone, but 4 wins from Ms5 weren't quite enough to earn a ticket to the sekitori ranks.  Ranked Ms3e now, another kachikoshi could well be enough this time. This section isn't hurting for potential storylines, with perennial high-ranker Hakuyozan attempting to move closer to juryo again after his Nagoya 3-4, recent makushita tsukedashi Mitoryu still trying to prove himself, and the March sandanme tsukedashi entrants Wakatakakage and Murata finding themselves rejoined after half a year, this time at Ms16.

Tier 4 (Q) - The most credible promotion contenders for Aki may well be found down here. 2016 debutant Kizaki has reached the promotion zone after his uninterrupted 8-KK ride through the rankings, and talented Kotodaigo finally gets the opportunity as well after a two-year detour due to injury plus career rebuild.

Edited by Asashosakari
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I recently had an up-and-close look at Midorifuji from Tier 2 over three days during the recent Isegahama-beya training camp in Yahiko. He was far and away the most skilled of the stable's non-sekitori rikishi. In fact his keiko performance was very reminiscent of Terutsuyoshi a year ago when he completely dominated his fellow lower-ranked stablemates at Maukushita-joi and later broke through into Juryo. However, Midorifuji is very light and may struggle in terms of size as he progresses up the ranks. Still a young rikishi to keep an eye on though. 

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My man Shonannoumi had a senshuraku win to give him two straight 6-1s.  He should end up around the 1/3 mark of the division.

My other man Kirinoryu didn't do so well...a senshuraku loss put him to 1-6 :(

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Rounding up the Aki results belatedly...

Tier 1: 

Both Shonannoumi and Kotokamatani had largely been putting up results that marked them as "at home" in the bottom third of the makushita division, but their results ofAki basho diverged quite significantly. Whereas Kotokamatani posted yet another middling 4-3 score that won't be advancing him much, Shonannoumi raced out to 6 wins for his first big break in makushita. Kyushu will be stern test for him and as usual 2-5 should probably be considered par for the course while anything better would be a success.

The other pair of youngest talents unfortunately provided less good news, with Kirinoryu falling prey to the sophomore slump with a 1-6 in his second makushita outing, and Yokuyusei having to sit out the second straight basho.

 

Heisei Hopefuls for Aki 2017 - Tier 1: Top Talents - current yardstick: Takagenji (1997/05/13, debut 2013.03, shin-juryo 2017.05)
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Shonannoumi Takadagawa 1998/04/08 (2) 2014.03 Ms40 Ms59e 4-3 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40e 3-4 Ms48e 1-6 Sd23e 6-1 Ms44w 6-1
Kirinoryu Michinoku 1997/06/13 (4) 2013.03 Ms52 Sd51w 4-3 Sd31w 3-4 Sd50e 5-2 Sd24e 5-2 Ms60e 4-3 Ms52w 1-6
Kotokamatani Sadogatake 1997/11/19 (3) 2015.11 Ms36 Ms43e 3-4 Ms50e 3-4 Sd3w 5-2 Ms46e 4-3 Ms36w 2-5 Ms53w 4-3
Yokuyusei Shibatayama 1998/09/10 (1) 2014.03 Ms58 Sd78w 5-2 Sd44w 5-2 Sd21w 5-2 Ms58e 2-5 Sd26w 0-0-7 Sd86w 0-0-7


Another high-powered newcomer is joining us for the next tournament:
 

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Ryuko Onoe 1998/06/23 2017.01 Sd11   Mz 3-0 Jk15w 6-1 Jd31e 6-1 Sd66w 6-1 Sd11w 5-2

It's not out-of-this-world great, but these are still very impressive early results for a high school grad. He's been mentioned around the forum before, so just to summarize: 19 years old, nephew of his shisho Onoe-oyakata, and the 2013 national middle school yokozuna, so definitely with some pedigree. He's of average build (for now anyway) at 180 cm / 126 kg, and while his kimarite profile indicates a heavy preference for push/trust techniques, from what I've seen so far it's not the frantic slap-slap-slap style favoured by many other guys of that size, but more the Akebono style forward strong-arming with mostly straight elbows. (For another comparison, think Tokushinho but without the throat grab as the endgame.) He does seem to be a bit vulnerable to opponents going low on him because of that, albeit less so than the aforementioned guys who were much taller, and that's something he'll have to work on, in addition to building up his physique. Dohyo sense-wise he seems okay but nothing special, although that's always hard to judge while a rikishi is not yet facing credible opposition in every bout.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 2:

A very decent though mostly unspectacular set of results here among the remaining under-22's. Gokushindo, fresh off a 2-5 in July at his career-high rank, bounced back in a big way with a 6-1. It's his third six-spot in four tournaments and he'll now be making his debut in the promotion zone, signalling his arrival as a bonafide future sekitori prospect.

All in all only two makekoshi among the 9 makushita-ranked denizens of this tier - one came courtesy of top-ranked talent Kiribayama who seemed to enter the basho with a pre-existing injury and was forced to drop out after just one match, the other went to makushita debutant Yamatoarashi who can arguably be happy with his 3 wins anyway. Other than that, lots of 4-3's and 5-2's well below each individual rikishi's career-high marks, so rather more expected than impressive. The notable positive exception was provided by Shikoroyama-beya's Oki who posted 5 wins at his best-ever rank.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Aki 2017 - Tier 2: Promising Youngsters - Age 21 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Kiribayama Michinoku 1996/04/24 (14) 2015.05 Ms10 Ms35e 5-2 Ms20e 5-2 Ms12w 3-4 Ms18e 6-1 Ms10e 3-4 Ms14w 0-1-6
Takayoshitoshi Takanohana 1997/05/13 (5) 2013.03 Ms11 Ms39e 4-3 Ms30w 6-1 Ms11e 2-5 Ms25e 4-3 Ms21e 4-3 Ms15w 4-3
Hamayutaka Tokitsukaze 1995/11/17 (18) 2011.05 Ms17 Ms59w 3-4 Sd11w 5-2 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40w 6-1 Ms17e 3-4 Ms25w 4-3
Kaito Asakayama 1996/06/19 (9) 2012.05 Ms20 Ms27w 4-3 Ms22e 3-4 Ms32w 5-2 Ms20e 2-5 Ms42w 5-2 Ms27w 4-3
Kotaro Fujishima 1995/12/06 (17) 2014.01 Ms14 Ms23e 3-4 Ms29e 4-3 Ms25w 4-3 Ms19w 4-3 Ms15w 2-5 Ms30e 4-3
Gokushindo Nishikido 1996/06/06 (11) 2012.03 Ms16 Ms51e 3-4 Ms58w 3-4 Sd13w 6-1 Ms38e 6-1 Ms16e 2-5 Ms31w 6-1
Oki Shikoroyama 1996/06/12 (10) 2013.07 Ms36 Sd32e 6-1 Ms49e 4-3 Ms42w 3-4 Ms54w 4-3 Ms43w 4-3 Ms36e 5-2
Takakento Takanohana 1996/02/10 (15) 2014.01 Ms26 Ms36e 2-5 Ms52e 3-4 Sd8e 4-3 Ms59e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms48w 5-2
Yamatoarashi Shikoroyama 1996/05/11 (13) 2012.03 Ms49 Sd18e 4-3 Sd7w 2-5 Sd33e 4-3 Sd18w 4-3 Sd7e 5-2 Ms49e 3-4
Nakazono Nishonoseki 1996/05/18 (12) 2012.03 Ms11 Sd40e 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 6-1 Ms29e 6-1 Ms11w 0-0-7 Ms51w 4-3
Midorifuji Isegahama 1996/08/30 (8) 2016.09 Ms46 Jk21w 7-0 D Jd10w 7-0 D Sd19w 5-2 Ms57w 4-3 Ms46w 3-4 Ms57e 4-3
Ohata Tokitsukaze 1996/10/24 (7) 2014.11 Ms40 Sd34w 3-4 Sd48e 4-3 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 4-3 Ms40e 2-5 Sd1e 2-5
Honda Nishikido 1997/03/11 (6) 2012.03 Ms52 Sd28e 5-2 Sd3e 4-3 Ms52w 2-5 Sd17w 5-2 Ms54e 2-5 Sd20w 6-1
Shuji Kise 1995/10/24 (19) 2014.03 Ms54 Sd20w 2-5 Sd41w 6-1 Ms54w 1-5-1 Sd23e 3-4 Sd46e 4-3 Sd33w 3-4
Tamakongo Kataonami 1995/09/19 (20) 2014.03 Ms25 Sd46w 5-2 Sd16e 3-4 Sd35w 7-0 Y Ms25w 0-7 Ms60w 1-6 Sd39w 6-1
Onojo Takadagawa 1996/01/31 (16) 2011.05 Ms60 Sd14w 4-3 Sd3w 0-7 Sd53w 5-2 Sd27e 3-4 Sd48e 3-4 Sd70e 4-3


Shuji and Tamakongo will be relocating to Tier 3 for Kyushu basho. Tamakongo has been bouncing around wildly since his sandanme yusho back in March, and it's hard to predict what the near future will hold for him. Shuji's recent scores look as though his makushita appearance was a fluke - always a strong possibility when somebody debuts with a 6-1 from way down the sandanme ranks - and he'll have to work just to get back up. All in all I suspect that neither guy will be making any major waves in his two Tier 3 years.


One new entrant will be added here for Kyushu:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Nishikifuji Isegahama 1996/07/22 2016.09 Sd2 Jk21e 7-0 Y Jd10e 7-0 Y Sd19e 3-4 Sd38w 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 4-3


Another prime example of the limited usefulness of jonokuchi and jonidan scores for assessing experienced newcomers - Nishikifuji and fellow second-year collegiate dropout and Isegahama-beya joinee Midorifuji easily brought down the house in their first two tournaments, culminating in a pair of yusho playoffs that were both won by Nishikifuji. Both of them have found things a lot tougher since hitting high sandanme, and while Midorifuji at least moved into makushita immediately it's now taken Nishikifuji four largely unimpressive results to follow suit. I still expect that he'll be establishing himself in the third division, but it's likely to be a tough fight just as it has been for (the much smaller-sized) Midorifuji.

It does bear keeping in mind that they turned pro two and a half years earlier than typical university grads do, but to project big-time sekitori upside I'd still be looking for something a little more impressive from a 21-year-old than either of them has shown so far. For his part, the 180 cm / 134 kg Nishikifuji appears to have a pretty straight-forward yotsu-based repertoire, although a smattering of pushing and slapdown results indicates some plan B versatility as well.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 3:

It's the 7th basho in a row in which one of our prospects successfully earned promotion to the juryo division, and this time it happened here. Congrats to Masunosho (by now Takanosho) who broke through with 6 wins to grab a promotion spot, which were hard to come by in Aki. Having made his debut in makushita at just 17 years of age in 2012 and gone as high as Ms18 within the first year, it nevertheless took him more than 5 years in the end. Of course, even now he's still only 22 - he turns 23 on Day 2 of the basho - so he's got plenty of time to progress further and make himself into a top division mainstay.

Next in line for promotion might be Mitoryu who seems to be fulfilling the expectations after all; his excellent 6-1 Aki record will be moving him up into the top 5 ranks. Not joining him for now is Hakuyozan who picked up his second straight 3-4 to drift further away from the promotable ranks.

The nascent careers of the former sandanme tsukedashi Wakatakakage and Murata reconverged at Ms16 for Aki basho, but they will be separating again after Wakatakakage achieved a 4-3 at this highest personal rank while Murata fell one win short of kachikoshi. Further down a 4-3 kachikoshi at a career-high position was also posted by Hokutoshu.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Aki 2017 - Tier 3: Still Worth Watching - Age 23 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Masunosho Chiganoura 1994/11/14 (28) 2010.03 Ms3 Ms6e 2-5 Ms15e 5-2 Ms8e 4-3 Ms6w 4-3 Ms5e 4-3 Ms3e 6-1
Hakuyozan Takadagawa 1995/04/13 (23) 2011.05 Ms1 Ms20w 4-3 Ms14e 4-3 Ms11w 5-2 Ms7w 5-2 Ms4e 3-4 Ms8e 3-4
Mitoryu Nishikido 1994/04/25 (38) 2017.05 Ms14       Ms15Td 3-4 Ms23w 5-2 Ms14e 6-1
Wakatakakage Arashio 1994/12/06 (26) 2017.03 Ms16     Sd100Td 5-2 Sd63w 7-0 Y Ms38w 6-1 Ms16e 4-3
Murata Takasago 1994/08/08 (33) 2017.03 Ms16     Sd100Td 6-1 Sd39e 7-0 D Ms27e 5-2 Ms16w 3-4
Wakamotoharu Arashio 1993/10/05 (47) 2011.11 Ms5 Ms12w 4-3 Ms8e 4-3 Ms5w 3-4 Ms9w 3-4 Ms14e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2
Takemasa Onomatsu 1993/10/22 (46) 2016.03 Ms8 Sd33w 4-3 Sd16w 7-0 Y Ms13e 4-3 Ms10w 4-3 Ms8w 2-5 Ms20w 2-5
Tsurubayashi Kise 1993/12/31 (44) 2009.03 Ms8 Ms28e 5-2 Ms18e 4-3 Ms14w 4-3 Ms12e 5-2 Ms8e 1-6 Ms27e 5-2
Kotokuzan Arashio 1994/03/11 (41) 2009.09 Ms28 Ms34w 4-3 Ms28w 2-5 Ms50e 5-2 Ms37w 2-5 Ms59e 6-1 Ms28e 3-4
Tochiseiryu Kasugano 1995/04/26 (21) 2014.03 Ms28 Ms47e 2-5 Sd4w 3-4 Sd24w 4-3 Sd11e 6-1 Ms35e 4-3 Ms28w 3-4
Hatooka Kise 1994/02/23 (42) 2016.03 Ms30 Sd15e 5-2 Ms50w 5-2 Ms36e 4-3 Ms30e 3-4 Ms41w 4-3 Ms33e 3-4
Asahiryu Asahiyama 1995/04/22 (22) 2016.05 Ms23 Sd79w 7-0 D Ms51e 6-1 Ms23e 3-4 Ms31w 4-3 Ms24e 3-4 Ms34e 5-2
Kaiseio Asakayama 1995/01/28 (24) 2013.03 Ms18 Ms31e 0-7 Sd6w 5-2 Ms46w 5-2 Ms35w 2-5 Ms55w 5-2 Ms37e 2-5
Hokutokawa Hakkaku 1994/08/15 (32) 2013.03 Ms31 Sd19w 5-2 Ms55e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms46w 5-2 Ms31e 3-4 Ms42w 2-5
Hokutoshu Hakkaku 1994/01/14 (43) 2012.03 Ms47 Sd5w 4-3 Ms55w 2-5 Sd16e 4-3 Sd4w 4-3 Ms54w 4-3 Ms47w 4-3
Tochinobori Kasugano 1993/09/01 (50) 2009.03 Ms12 Ms31w 4-3 Ms26e 4-3 Ms22e 3-4 Ms31e 0-2-5 Sd6w 4-3 Ms56w 5-2
Ichiyamamoto Nishonoseki 1993/10/01 (48) 2017.01 Ms57   Mz 3-0 Jk15e 7-0 Y Jd10e 6-1 Sd49e 6-1 Ms57w 6-1
Itadaki Isenoumi 1994/09/05 (31) 2010.03 Ms56 Sd46e 4-3 Sd29w 4-3 Sd16w 5-2 Ms56w 2-5 Sd23w 5-2 Ms59e 3-4
Aomihama Dewanoumi 1994/10/27 (30) 2010.03 Ms49 Sd50w 3-4 Sd61e 6-1 Sd7e 4-3 Ms57e 2-5 Sd24w 5-2 Ms59w 4-3
Nishiyama Onoe 1994/04/27 (37) 2010.03 Ms22 Ms54e 3-4 Sd2e 3-4 Sd17w 4-3 Ms60w 4-3 Ms50e 3-4 Sd4w 3-4
Rikito Tokitsukaze 1993/09/21 (49) 2011.09 Ms19 Ms32e 3-4 Ms38w 4-3 Ms34w 2-5 Sd1e 6-1 Ms30e 0-7 Sd5w 2-5
Ichiki Tamanoi 1993/11/13 (45) 2016.01 Ms16 Ms53w 6-1 Ms24w 5-2 Ms16w 3-4 Ms23w 2-5 Ms44e 2-5 Sd6w 5-2
Musashikuni Musashigawa 1994/12/17 (25) 2013.07 Ms26 Ms43w 2-5 Ms59w 5-2 Ms41w 3-4 Ms53e 2-5 Sd21w 4-3 Sd8e 4-3
Chiyonokatsu Kokonoe 1994/04/13 (40) 2013.03 Ms57 Sd48e 6-1 Ms57e 2-5 Sd22w 4-3 Sd8w 2-5 Sd38e 5-2 Sd12w 3-4
Kotohayato Sadogatake 1994/04/18 (39) 2010.03 Ms48 Ms60w 3-4 Sd12w 3-4 Sd31w 6-1 Ms48w 3-4 Ms58e 3-4 Sd14w 2-5
Yutakasho Sakaigawa 1994/11/19 (27) 2013.03 Ms49 Sd81e 6-1 Sd23w 4-3 Sd12w 3-4 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 2-5 Sd15e 4-3
Fukamiyama Onoe 1994/11/12 (29) 2010.03 Ms47 Ms49e 3-4 Ms56w 4-3 Ms47e 2-5 Sd12e 4-3 Sd1w 3-4 Sd19e 4-3
Kotonoshu Sadogatake 1994/07/01 (35) 2010.03 Ms53 Sd31e 4-3 Sd14w 4-3 Sd4e 1-5-1 Sd40w 5-2 Sd15e 3-1-3 Sd35e 4-3
Kirinofuji Michinoku 1994/07/28 (34) 2011.01 Ms52 Sd24e 5-2 Ms59e 3-4 Sd14w 2-5 Sd44e 5-2 Sd17e 3-4 Sd41e 4-3
Baraki Shikihide 1994/05/10 (36) 2013.01 Ms58 Sd44e 4-3 Sd25e 3-4 Sd45e 3-4 Sd65w 3-4 Sd84w 5-2 Sd49w 4-3


Rookie Ichiyamamoto's first basho in Tier 3 was a successful one at 6-1, but for now we're saying goodbye to him as he turned 24 in October. We'll probably be seeing him again inside the top 15 ranks at some point for a Tier 4 entry. Also dropping off is Rikito, and for him I'm much less optimistic that he'll make a return to the prospect ranks. Meanwhile three others are moving over to Tier 4 rather than getting dismissed - Wakamotoharu, Takemasa and Tochinobori have prior experience in the top quarter of the division and thus get two more years to prove themselves.


And all the departures are swiftly replaced by this trio:
 

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Saidaiji Irumagawa 1994/06/09 2013.01 Sd9 Sd60e 3-4 Sd68e 4-3 Sd49w 4-3 Sd33w 2-5 Sd64e 6-1 Sd9w 5-2
Enho Miyagino 1994/10/18 2017.03 Sd18     Mz 2-0 Jk9e 7-0 Y Jd10e 7-0 Y Sd18w 7-0 Y
Matsuda Minezaki 1994/09/19 2013.03 Sd64 Sd71w 3-4 Sd77w 3-4 Sd96e 3-4 Jd21e 4-3 Jd1w 4-3 Sd82e 7-0 D


I honestly don't have much to say about Saidaiji...taking nearly five years to reach makushita isn't overly impressive for a high schooler, especially one who came in built like him (180 cm / 177 kg), although it looks like he might not actually have had any significant sumo experience as he didn't get press attention at all on his debut. He had never KK'ed above Sd65 until four tournaments ago, so it's been a flurry of advancement after years of relative stagnation. As usual in these cases I expect that the improvement is largely for real but won't be extended much further for a while, so he'll probably morph into a makushita-sandanme elevator guy now. In any case: 50% yori, 30% oshi, 10% slapdowns, so his sumo is as basic and straight-forward as it gets.

Conversely, not much needs to be said about Enho. The 21-0 start largely speaks for itself, although he's had quite a few close calls during the streak due to his aggressive, take-no-prisoners style. Size-wise he's certainly not somebody one would have expected to do this well, even as a collegiate grad against lower-level opposition. Of course, the real tests only start now in makushita, where he'll be making a grand entrance right into the top 15 ranks.

Enho's Aki yusho playoff opponent Matsuda falls into the Omori bracket as far as career patterns go, also having taken nearly five years from an 18-year-old debut. However, he's done it on half the body size (179 cm / 89 kg on entry). He's still not much bigger now - 108 kg at the last Kyokai data update - and his jump to makushita is as fluky as it gets, as the 7-0 at Sd82 was actually his highest-ranking KK ever. Anything better than 1-6 would shock me, and I suspect that this will remain his only makushita appearance before he turns 24 next September and has to leave us again.

(On a sidenote, it's actually fairly rare to see two guys make their makushita debuts off a 7-0 in the same basho.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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16 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

One new entrant will be added here for Kyushu:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Nishikifuji Isegahama 1996/07/22 2016.09 Sd2 Jk21e 7-0 Y Jd10e 7-0 Y Sd19e 3-4 Sd38w 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 4-3


Another prime example of the limited usefulness of jonokuchi and jonidan scores for assessing experienced newcomers - Nishikifuji and fellow second-year collegiate dropout and Isegahama-beya joinee Midorifuji easily brought down the house in their first two tournaments, culminating in a pair of yusho playoffs that were both won by Nishikifuji. Both of them have found things a lot tougher since hitting high sandanme, and while Midorifuji at least moved into makushita immediately it's now taken Nishikifuji four largely unimpressive results to follow suit. I still expect that he'll be establishing himself in the third division, but it's likely to be a tough fight just as it has been for (the much smaller-sized) Midorifuji.

It does bear keeping in mind that they turned pro two and a half years earlier than typical university grads do, but to project big-time sekitori upside I'd still be looking for something a little more impressive from a 21-year-old than either of them has shown so far. For his part, the 180 cm / 134 kg Nishikifuji appears to have a pretty straight-forward yotsu-based repertoire, although a smattering of pushing and slapdown results indicates some plan B versatility as well.

Thanks for the report on this local boy!  I have been "hopeful" for him for some time now.  It's exciting to have both a local sekitori (Daiseido) and a hopeful.

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Tier 4:

Kizaki and Kotodaigo were both making their debut in the top 5 makushita ranks in Aki basho. They both fell just short of kachikoshi, although in rather different ways - Kizaki found himself 3-1 after the first week and then failed to convert on his three KK opportunities, while Kotodaigo struggled early and later rallied from 1-4 to 3-4.

Lots of strong records for the rest of the Tier 4 crowd, albeit all at ranks well below their individual levels of competence. The most impressive score is certainly Tochimaru's 6-1 with which he was even in the yusho race until picking up the loss to Mitoryu on Day 11. Following his three-basho slide in the first half of the year, the last couple of tournaments have been a fine return to form for the once highly touted Kasugano-beya rikishi (wampaku national champion in both 4th and 6th grade), and perhaps he can push on for another spring challenge now after his attempts to break into juryo in both early 2016 and early 2017 proved unsuccessful.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Aki 2017 - Tier 4: Last Chance Saloon - Ms15+ Age 25 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2016.11 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09
Kizaki Kise 1993/05/06 (52) 2016.03 Ms3 Ms26e 4-3 Ms21e 5-2 Ms13w 5-2 Ms9e 4-3 Ms7e 5-2 Ms3w 3-4
Kotodaigo Sadogatake 1993/01/14 (53) 2011.05 Ms4 Sd10w 6-1 Ms34e 5-2 Ms21w 4-3 Ms16w 4-3 Ms13w 6-1 Ms4e 3-4
Tochimaru Kasugano 1992/08/26 (56) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms4w 4-3 Ms3w 3-4 Ms7e 2-5 Ms16e 2-5 Ms32e 5-2 Ms20e 6-1
Tamaki Takasago 1993/05/29 (51) 2016.01 Ms10 Ms17e 4-3 Ms10w 3-4 Ms15e 3-4 Ms20w 3-4 Ms30w 4-3 Ms23e 5-2
Akinohana Takadagawa 1992/11/30 (55) 2008.03 Ms6 Ms10w 1-6 Ms31w 3-4 Ms43w 4-3 Ms37e 4-3 Ms31w 4-3 Ms25e 5-2
Shiba Kise 1991/12/24 (61) 2014.03 Ms3 Ms8w 5-2 Ms5e 3-4 Ms8w 1-6 Ms28e 5-2 Ms19e 3-4 Ms29e 5-2
Chiyonoumi Kokonoe 1993/01/11 (54) 2015.05 Ms13 Sd36e 5-2 Sd7e 6-1 Ms32e 4-3 Ms26w 4-3 Ms22e 2-5 Ms39e 5-2
Irodori Shikoroyama 1992/03/10 (59) 2007.03 Ms8 Ms8e 3-4 Ms12e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2 Ms12w 2-5 Ms29e 3-4 Ms39w 6-1
Wakatakamoto Arashio 1991/12/29 (60) 2009.11 Ms11 Ms30w 0-0-7 Sd10w 5-2 Ms48e 4-3 Ms39e 3-4 Ms49e 4-3 Ms40w 1-1-5
Ayanoumi Yamahibiki 1992/03/23 (58) 2007.03 Ms14 Ms55e 5-2 Ms37e 4-3 Ms33w 1-6 Sd5w 4-3 Ms56e 3-4 Sd11e 4-3
Wakayama Onomatsu 1992/04/26 (57) 2011.07 Ms15 Mz 3-0 Jk16w 6-1 Y Jd32e 7-0 Y Sd32e 4-3 Sd16e 3-4 Sd36e 3-4


No departures or new arrivals here.

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The lineups for Kyushu 2017:

Tier 1 (Q) - A major challenge awaits Shonannoumi following his 6-1 boost up the rankings, and it would be big news if he does well here. Ryuko's makushita debut will be a second point of attention and a strong showing here would go a long way towards demontrating that he's got sekitori upside even in the short term.

Tier 2 (Q) - And we complete the year with zero appearances in the single-digit ranks from this group of rikishi. Gokushindo is arguably the biggest story here at the moment as he tries to capitalize on his recent upwards momentum. But the new #1-ranked rikishi is Takayoshitoshi who has had three straight 4-3's and surely hopes to catch up to twin brother Takagenji. Last basho's top-ranker Kiribayama will hopefully be back in action after missing most of Aki basho.

Tier 3 (Q) - Two-time amateur major winner Mitoryu has arrived in the promotion zone after three tournaments and it will be interesting how he gets on against the typically cut-throat level of competition in this area. Potential star in the making Enho is ranked Ms14 for the continuation of his winning streak, but suffered some sort of foot injury during the jungyo tour and may be in less than ideal condition for the honbasho. Wakatakakage and Hakuyozan join these two in the top 15 with theoretical promotion chances.

Tier 4 (Q) - Kizaki and Kotodaigo received relatively lenient treatment following their Aki 3-4's and could get back to the promotion zone with a simple kachikoshi. Tochimaru is also back to the single-digit ranks for another go at promotion.

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Watching for Wakatakage and Enho, they will ptobably meet since they are at ms14 and ms12, in my view these are two of the most promising rikishi right now.

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The Kyushu roundups...

Tier 1 (with video!):

Shonannoumi received a major boost up the rankings following his Aki 6-1, and any doubts that he might be overmatched near the extended promotion zone were dispelled by Day 6 after he had raced out to a 3-0 start. He ultimately finished with 5 shiroboshi and has firmly announced himself as the main contender to be the next youngest sekitori.

Kotokamatani had a good turn on the dohyo as well and matched the frontrunner's 5-2 record. After a year of idling in low makushita he'll now get the opportunity to take a step forward as he's set to make his upper-half debut. Makushita rookie Ryuko, not to be outdone, also scored 5 wins to keep his career record free of makekoshi. Kirinoryu meanwhile had a minimum bounceback from last basho's 1-6 wake-up call, finishing 4-3 which will see him remain in sandanme for now.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Kyushu 2017 - Tier 1: Top Talents - current yardstick: Takagenji (1997/05/13, debut 2013.03, shin-juryo 2017.05)
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Shonannoumi Takadagawa 1998/04/08 (3) 2014.03 Ms18 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40e 3-4 Ms48e 1-6 Sd23e 6-1 Ms44w 6-1 Ms18w 5-2
Kotokamatani Sadogatake 1997/11/19 (4) 2015.11 Ms36 Ms50e 3-4 Sd3w 5-2 Ms46e 4-3 Ms36w 2-5 Ms53w 4-3 Ms45e 5-2
Ryuko Onoe 1998/06/23 (2) 2017.01 Ms50 Mz 3-0 Jk15w 6-1 Jd31e 6-1 Sd66w 6-1 Sd11w 5-2 Ms50e 5-2
Kirinoryu Michinoku 1997/06/13 (5) 2013.03 Ms52 Sd31w 3-4 Sd50e 5-2 Sd24e 5-2 Ms60e 4-3 Ms52w 1-6 Sd22w 4-3
Yokuyusei Shibatayama 1998/09/10 (1) 2014.03 Ms58 Sd44w 5-2 Sd21w 5-2 Ms58e 2-5 Sd26w 0-0-7 Sd86w 0-0-7 Jd46w 0-0-7
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Tier 2:

A pretty average tournament for this group. Nobody above Ms30 finished better than 4-3, so no major expectations have been set for the new year. Though to be fair, one of the 4-3's was achieved by Takayoshitoshi at equal his career-high rank, so he has taken a small step towards following twin brother Takagenji into the hallowed sekitoriland.

Gokushindo made his promotion zone debut in Kyushu, and while he wasn't able to pull off a kachikoshi he did score respectable 3 wins and will hopefully continue to establish himself up there. Notable results elsewhere include Takakento's 5-2 which will be moving him up to a new career high mark, almost three years after the last one, and a pair of 6-1 records by Kiribayama and Nishikifuji, the former recovering from his missed Aki basho and the latter producing a stunning and quite unexpected makushita debut - my last update mused that Nishikifuji will need to be more impressive than he's been so far to announce himself as a bonafide prospect, and this result has certainly done that.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Kyushu 2017 - Tier 2: Promising Youngsters - Age 21 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Takayoshitoshi Takanohana 1997/05/13 (6) 2013.03 Ms11 Ms30w 6-1 Ms11e 2-5 Ms25e 4-3 Ms21e 4-3 Ms15w 4-3 Ms11w 4-3
Gokushindo Nishikido 1996/06/06 (13) 2012.03 Ms12 Ms58w 3-4 Sd13w 6-1 Ms38e 6-1 Ms16e 2-5 Ms31w 6-1 Ms12w 3-4
Hamayutaka Tokitsukaze 1995/11/17 (20) 2011.05 Ms17 Sd11w 5-2 Ms48w 4-3 Ms40w 6-1 Ms17e 3-4 Ms25w 4-3 Ms21e 2-5
Kaito Asakayama 1996/06/19 (11) 2012.05 Ms20 Ms22e 3-4 Ms32w 5-2 Ms20e 2-5 Ms42w 5-2 Ms27w 4-3 Ms22e 2-5
Kotaro Fujishima 1995/12/06 (19) 2014.01 Ms14 Ms29e 4-3 Ms25w 4-3 Ms19w 4-3 Ms15w 2-5 Ms30e 4-3 Ms24w 4-3
Oki Shikoroyama 1996/06/12 (12) 2013.07 Ms25 Ms49e 4-3 Ms42w 3-4 Ms54w 4-3 Ms43w 4-3 Ms36e 5-2 Ms25e 3-4
Takakento Takanohana 1996/02/10 (17) 2014.01 Ms26 Ms52e 3-4 Sd8e 4-3 Ms59e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms48w 5-2 Ms34w 5-2
Nakazono Nishonoseki 1996/05/18 (14) 2012.03 Ms11 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 6-1 Ms29e 6-1 Ms11w 0-0-7 Ms51w 4-3 Ms41w 3-4
Honda Nishikido 1997/03/11 (7) 2012.03 Ms42 Sd3e 4-3 Ms52w 2-5 Sd17w 5-2 Ms54e 2-5 Sd20w 6-1 Ms42e 3-4
Midorifuji Isegahama 1996/08/30 (9) 2016.09 Ms46 Jd10w 7-0 D Sd19w 5-2 Ms57w 4-3 Ms46w 3-4 Ms57e 4-3 Ms46e 4-3
Kiribayama Michinoku 1996/04/24 (16) 2015.05 Ms10 Ms20e 5-2 Ms12w 3-4 Ms18e 6-1 Ms10e 3-4 Ms14w 0-1-6 Ms49w 6-1
Nishikifuji Isegahama 1996/07/22 (10) 2016.09 Ms52 Jd10e 7-0 Y Sd19e 3-4 Sd38w 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 4-3 Ms52w 6-1
Yamatoarashi Shikoroyama 1996/05/11 (15) 2012.03 Ms49 Sd7w 2-5 Sd33e 4-3 Sd18w 4-3 Sd7e 5-2 Ms49e 3-4 Ms59w 2-5
Ohata Tokitsukaze 1996/10/24 (8) 2014.11 Ms40 Sd48e 4-3 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 4-3 Ms40e 2-5 Sd1e 2-5 Sd24e 2-5
Onojo Takadagawa 1996/01/31 (18) 2011.05 Ms60 Sd3w 0-7 Sd53w 5-2 Sd27e 3-4 Sd48e 3-4 Sd70e 4-3 Sd51e 5-2


Newly 22-year-olds Hamayutaka and Kotaro will have to continue their semi-promising prospect path-finding in Tier 3, while one newcomer is joining us here:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Taichiyama Chiganoura 1997/04/21 2013.03 Sd3 Jd17w 6-1 Sd55w 6-1 Sd3w 0-7 Sd53w 4-3 Sd35w 4-3 Sd24w 6-1

Taichiyama made his debut some five years ago and was drawing superficial comparisons to stablemate Masunoyama at the time (who was maegashira then and is now sadly ranked even behind the kid). He enjoyed a fairly smooth progression for three years, moving up to mid-sandanme, where an injury took him out of action for two tournaments (anybody have details?) and sent him down to mid-jonidan. The career reboot hit an 0-7 roadblock with makushita already in a sight a year later, which seems to have prompted the change to his current shikona.

The promotion-clinching result has come a bit out of left field now, and while I'd like to be skeptical about his readiness for makushita, it must be said that his Kyushu performance was quite impressive (as you're welcome to see for yourself) and impossible to consider a fluke. Being just 20 there's certainly sekitori upside here, especially as he should still have some room for growth in the weight department - the Kyokai has him at 157 kg, basically unchanged from his 2013 debut, so it looks like his advancement so far has been supported largely by general fitness improvements rather than simply packing on the pounds. Technique-wise he has stayed true to his hatsu-dohyo outlook, with a strong focus on pushing. However, it's close quarters full-body pushing rather than the arms outstretched pusher-thruster type, so he's also got a sizable number of yorikiri on his tally. The lack of other belt-related kimarite makes it clear though that he's not really a mawashi technician.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 3:

Our sole promotee of the basho hails from here, as Mitoryu completed the three-basho KK turnaround from his surprise makekoshi debut last May. I for one don't find his sumo all that attractive, but you can't argue with its effectiveness and he should easily establish himself as a sekitori and presumably soon in makuuchi.

The new tier-gashira will be Enho, who didn't let a gimpy foot stop him from picking up 5 wins, although his 21-win streak came to its end right in the first bout. However, much like with fellow submariners Ura and Tobizaru, he seems headed towards having lots of bouts that are either one-sided losses or injuries waiting to happen, so one has to wonder about his long-term prospects. Optimistically he does seem a little smarter at picking his spots than Ura is, so perhaps that's an indication that he'll be able to moderate his style a bit as he continues to move up.

The rivalry by proxy between last year's sandanme tsukedashi duo Wakatakakage and Murata swung back in favour of the latter again, with Wakatakakage going 3-4 at his career-high, ending his debut KK streak at 4 basho, while Murata bounced back from his own MK with a strong 6-1 performance. Another impressive 6-win score was turned in by Kotokuzan near his career-best rank, and within half a year he has turned himself from a relative also-ran into an interesting sekitori candidate.

While Enho easily cleared the KK line things were much tougher for the other two makushita debutants, with Saidaiji going 2-5 and Matsuda even scoring the dreaded zenpai 0-7 to reverse his Aki result.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Kyushu 2017 - Tier 3: Still Worth Watching - Age 23 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Mitoryu Nishikido 1994/04/25 (42) 2017.05 Ms4     Ms15Td 3-4 Ms23w 5-2 Ms14e 6-1 Ms4e 6-1
Wakatakakage Arashio 1994/12/06 (28) 2017.03 Ms12   Sd100Td 5-2 Sd63w 7-0 Y Ms38w 6-1 Ms16e 4-3 Ms12e 3-4
Hakuyozan Takadagawa 1995/04/13 (25) 2011.05 Ms1 Ms14e 4-3 Ms11w 5-2 Ms7w 5-2 Ms4e 3-4 Ms8e 3-4 Ms13e 4-3
Enho Miyagino 1994/10/18 (32) 2017.03 Ms14   Mz 2-0 Jk9e 7-0 Y Jd10e 7-0 Y Sd18w 7-0 Y Ms14w 5-2
Tsurubayashi Kise 1993/12/31 (48) 2009.03 Ms8 Ms18e 4-3 Ms14w 4-3 Ms12e 5-2 Ms8e 1-6 Ms27e 5-2 Ms19e 4-3
Murata Takasago 1994/08/08 (36) 2017.03 Ms16   Sd100Td 6-1 Sd39e 7-0 D Ms27e 5-2 Ms16w 3-4 Ms22w 6-1
Asahiryu Asahiyama 1995/04/22 (24) 2016.05 Ms23 Ms51e 6-1 Ms23e 3-4 Ms31w 4-3 Ms24e 3-4 Ms34e 5-2 Ms23e 3-4
Kotokuzan Arashio 1994/03/11 (45) 2009.09 Ms28 Ms28w 2-5 Ms50e 5-2 Ms37w 2-5 Ms59e 6-1 Ms28e 3-4 Ms34e 6-1
Tochiseiryu Kasugano 1995/04/26 (23) 2014.03 Ms28 Sd4w 3-4 Sd24w 4-3 Sd11e 6-1 Ms35e 4-3 Ms28w 3-4 Ms35w 3-4
Hokutoshu Hakkaku 1994/01/14 (47) 2012.03 Ms38 Ms55w 2-5 Sd16e 4-3 Sd4w 4-3 Ms54w 4-3 Ms47w 4-3 Ms38w 2-5
Hatooka Kise 1994/02/23 (46) 2016.03 Ms30 Ms50w 5-2 Ms36e 4-3 Ms30e 3-4 Ms41w 4-3 Ms33e 3-4 Ms41e 2-5
Ichiki Tamanoi 1993/11/13 (49) 2016.01 Ms16 Ms24w 5-2 Ms16w 3-4 Ms23w 2-5 Ms44e 2-5 Sd6w 5-2 Ms43w 4-3
Saidaiji Irumagawa 1994/06/09 (39) 2013.01 Ms47 Sd68e 4-3 Sd49w 4-3 Sd33w 2-5 Sd64e 6-1 Sd9w 5-2 Ms47w 2-5
Aomihama Dewanoumi 1994/10/27 (31) 2010.03 Ms48 Sd61e 6-1 Sd7e 4-3 Ms57e 2-5 Sd24w 5-2 Ms59w 4-3 Ms48w 3-4
Tamakongo Kataonami 1995/09/19 (22) 2014.03 Ms25 Sd16e 3-4 Sd35w 7-0 Y Ms25w 0-7 Ms60w 1-6 Sd39w 6-1 Ms53e 3-4
Matsuda Minezaki 1994/09/19 (33) 2013.03 Ms53 Sd77w 3-4 Sd96e 3-4 Jd21e 4-3 Jd1w 4-3 Sd82e 7-0 D Ms53w 0-7
Kaiseio Asakayama 1995/01/28 (26) 2013.03 Ms18 Sd6w 5-2 Ms46w 5-2 Ms35w 2-5 Ms55w 5-2 Ms37e 2-5 Ms56e 3-4
Musashikuni Musashigawa 1994/12/17 (27) 2013.07 Ms26 Ms59w 5-2 Ms41w 3-4 Ms53e 2-5 Sd21w 4-3 Sd8e 4-3 Ms57e 4-3
Hokutokawa Hakkaku 1994/08/15 (35) 2013.03 Ms31 Ms55e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms46w 5-2 Ms31e 3-4 Ms42w 2-5 Sd2w 5-2
Yutakasho Sakaigawa 1994/11/19 (29) 2013.03 Ms49 Sd23w 4-3 Sd12w 3-4 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 2-5 Sd15e 4-3 Sd3e 2-5
Fukamiyama Onoe 1994/11/12 (30) 2010.03 Ms47 Ms56w 4-3 Ms47e 2-5 Sd12e 4-3 Sd1w 3-4 Sd19e 4-3 Sd7e 2-5
Itadaki Isenoumi 1994/09/05 (34) 2010.03 Ms56 Sd29w 4-3 Sd16w 5-2 Ms56w 2-5 Sd23w 5-2 Ms59e 3-4 Sd11w 4-3
Nishiyama Onoe 1994/04/27 (41) 2010.03 Ms22 Sd2e 3-4 Sd17w 4-3 Ms60w 4-3 Ms50e 3-4 Sd4w 3-4 Sd14e 1-6
Kotonoshu Sadogatake 1994/07/01 (38) 2010.03 Ms53 Sd14w 4-3 Sd4e 1-5-1 Sd40w 5-2 Sd15e 3-1-3 Sd35e 4-3 Sd23w 3-4
Chiyonokatsu Kokonoe 1994/04/13 (44) 2013.03 Ms57 Ms57e 2-5 Sd22w 4-3 Sd8w 2-5 Sd38e 5-2 Sd12w 3-4 Sd26e 4-3
Kirinofuji Michinoku 1994/07/28 (37) 2011.01 Ms52 Ms59e 3-4 Sd14w 2-5 Sd44e 5-2 Sd17e 3-4 Sd41e 4-3 Sd27e 6-1
Baraki Shikihide 1994/05/10 (40) 2013.01 Ms58 Sd25e 3-4 Sd45e 3-4 Sd65w 3-4 Sd84w 5-2 Sd49w 4-3 Sd31w 2-5
Kotohayato Sadogatake 1994/04/18 (43) 2010.03 Ms48 Sd12w 3-4 Sd31w 6-1 Ms48w 3-4 Ms58e 3-4 Sd14w 2-5 Sd39w 6-1
Shuji Kise 1995/10/24 (21) 2014.03 Ms54 Sd41w 6-1 Ms54w 1-5-1 Sd23e 3-4 Sd46e 4-3 Sd33w 3-4 Sd47w 0-0-7


New Year's Eve birthday boy Tsurubayashi just can't seem to break through, but having been up in the Ms top 15 ranks as far back as 2014 he's easily qualified to receive two more prospect years in Tier 4. Undersized university grad Ichiki very nearly got there as well during his initial rise (first year 34-8!), but having fallen just short at Ms16 he's not eligible for the transfer - and his recent results also make it somewhat improbable that he's going to manage to rejoin within the two-year window.


Three's a crowd, but four's our number of debutants for Hatsu basho:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Tanabe Kise 1994/05/12 2017.03 Sd16   Mz 2-0 Jk6e 6-1 Jd35e 6-1 Sd71w 6-1 Sd16w 5-2
Kotoinagaki Sadogatake 1994/05/14 2016.03 Sd9 Sd54w 4-3 Sd37e 5-2 Sd9e 2-5 Sd40w 2-5 Sd72w 6-1 Sd17w 5-2
Tomokaze Oguruma 1994/12/02 2017.05 Sd53     Mz 3-0 Jk25e 7-0 Y Jd15e 6-1 Sd53e 7-0 Y
Tsuyukusa Otake 1994/12/06 2016.09 Sd35 Jd64w 3-4 Jd75w 5-2 Jd33e 7-0 D Sd35w 3-4 Sd57w 2-5 Sd79w 7-0 D

Tanabe is part of the collegiate triumvirate alongside Enho and Fukuyama that has blitzed through the lower divisions since Haru 2017, although it's been clear that the pecking order is Enho > Tanabe > Fukuyama. (See head-to-heads linked on the arrows.) While Fukuyama fell a bit short with 4-3 from Sd13w, Tanabe has at least clinched the promotion to makushita now. His Kyushu bouts looked okay to me, but not like he was still ranked miles away from his personal wall. I'd guess there's still enough room left for a successful first makushita appearance, though.

Tomokaze has a very interesting private background for a sumotori, but sumo-wise I can't say I've been that impressed so far despite the 20-1 start. Nice enough pushing sumo, but a number of opponents have already managed to discombobulate him by not being sitting ducks for it, and I'm left to wonder just how much his upcoming makushita-level opponents will be able to counter it. But as always, it's nearly impossible to draw definitive conclusions about a collegiate guy from competition that's taken place no higher than mid-sandanme.

Kotoinagaki has the typical age and debut date of a university grad as well, but his competitive background was in Olympic wrestling, and quite successfully so. I'm hard-pressed to say if his relatively modest speed of advancement has been disappointing given his athletic tools, or if it's par for the course for someone who's had to learn sumo from nearly scratch. More than anyone, he's probably a prime exhibit for "the real work starts now in makushita". If he can keep improving I wouldn't bet against him making it to juryo. The question is how much room for improvement he truly still has, and I can't even begin to answer that. Somewhat surprising for somebody with wrestling skills his kimarite record thus far is dominated by pushing and evasive sumo.

And speaking of learning sumo from scratch, here's Polish-Japanese youngster Tsuyukusa who has earned himself a steak or two from Kintamayama by now. Still don't really know what to make of him, but his frantic take-no-prisoners style is fun to watch; largely thanks to One And Only's efforts we've got plenty of video to peruse if you want to review his efforts. Age is obviously not quite on his side, but he's probably already done better than anyone had a right to expect, so maybe there's more to come. Can't imagine he'll manage to KK in makushita for now, but I wouldn't be surprised if his aggressive approach will overwhelm an opponent or two this month.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 4:

Not such a great basho for our last-chancers, with the only impressive win totals posted by those ranked well outside the top 15. Kizaki and Kotodaigo went makekoshi for the second time running and they'll now have to undergo quite a bit of rebuilding before they can challenge for promotion again. Tochimaru ran smack into the wall again, so his previous two good scores didn't herald a new era for him.

On the flipside there are Wakamotoharu and Tamaki, both on successive KKs following earlier slides (back-to-back-to-back 3-4's for both of them). Of course, that does mean they've been busy making up lost ground rather than reaching new highs. The most notable positive performance of the basho came courtesy of Chiyonoumi, whose 6-1 record is now finally going to put him back where he was before his injury woes two years ago.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Kyushu 2017 - Tier 4: Last Chance Saloon - Ms15+ Age 25 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.01 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11
Kizaki Kise 1993/05/06 (54) 2016.03 Ms3 Ms21e 5-2 Ms13w 5-2 Ms9e 4-3 Ms7e 5-2 Ms3w 3-4 Ms7e 3-4
Kotodaigo Sadogatake 1993/01/14 (55) 2011.05 Ms4 Ms34e 5-2 Ms21w 4-3 Ms16w 4-3 Ms13w 6-1 Ms4e 3-4 Ms8e 2-5
Tochimaru Kasugano 1992/08/26 (58) 2011.05 Ms3 Ms3w 3-4 Ms7e 2-5 Ms16e 2-5 Ms32e 5-2 Ms20e 6-1 Ms8w 2-5
Wakamotoharu Arashio 1993/10/05 (51) 2011.11 Ms5 Ms8e 4-3 Ms5w 3-4 Ms9w 3-4 Ms14e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2 Ms11e 4-3
Tamaki Takasago 1993/05/29 (53) 2016.01 Ms10 Ms10w 3-4 Ms15e 3-4 Ms20w 3-4 Ms30w 4-3 Ms23e 5-2 Ms15e 4-3
Irodori Shikoroyama 1992/03/10 (61) 2007.03 Ms8 Ms12e 3-4 Ms18w 5-2 Ms12w 2-5 Ms29e 3-4 Ms39w 6-1 Ms16w 3-4
Akinohana Takadagawa 1992/11/30 (57) 2008.03 Ms6 Ms31w 3-4 Ms43w 4-3 Ms37e 4-3 Ms31w 4-3 Ms25e 5-2 Ms17e 4-3
Shiba Kise 1991/12/24 (63) 2014.03 Ms3 Ms5e 3-4 Ms8w 1-6 Ms28e 5-2 Ms19e 3-4 Ms29e 5-2 Ms20w 5-2
Chiyonoumi Kokonoe 1993/01/11 (56) 2015.05 Ms13 Sd7e 6-1 Ms32e 4-3 Ms26w 4-3 Ms22e 2-5 Ms39e 5-2 Ms27w 6-1
Takemasa Onomatsu 1993/10/22 (50) 2016.03 Ms8 Sd16w 7-0 Y Ms13e 4-3 Ms10w 4-3 Ms8w 2-5 Ms20w 2-5 Ms33e 4-3
Tochinobori Kasugano 1993/09/01 (52) 2009.03 Ms12 Ms26e 4-3 Ms22e 3-4 Ms31e 0-2-5 Sd6w 4-3 Ms56w 5-2 Ms39w 3-4
Ayanoumi Yamahibiki 1992/03/23 (60) 2007.03 Ms14 Ms37e 4-3 Ms33w 1-6 Sd5w 4-3 Ms56e 3-4 Sd11e 4-3 Ms60w 5-2
Wakatakamoto Arashio 1991/12/29 (62) 2009.11 Ms11 Sd10w 5-2 Ms48e 4-3 Ms39e 3-4 Ms49e 4-3 Ms40w 1-1-5 Sd10w 6-1
Wakayama Onomatsu 1992/04/26 (59) 2011.07 Ms15 Jk16w 6-1 Y Jd32e 7-0 Y Sd32e 4-3 Sd16e 3-4 Sd36e 3-4 Sd49e 5-2


Time to say goodbye to Shiba, who looks like a prime candidate for a cup of coffee in juryo some years down the line, as well as Wakatakamoto, the eldest brother in the Onami trio.

No newcomers here, but I'd like to use this spot to highlight one additional makushita debutant in Hatsu basho, namely the freshly renamed Asakishin, who some might still remember as that body-building guy. Not nearly in prospect territory with his age, but still a good story - it's been nice to see him stick with sumo until now.

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On ‎03‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 16:41, Asashosakari said:

Taichiyama made his debut some five years ago and was drawing superficial comparisons to stablemate Masunoyama at the time (who was maegashira then and is now sadly ranked even behind the kid). He enjoyed a fairly smooth progression for three years, moving up to mid-sandanme, where an injury took him out of action for two tournaments (anybody have details?) and sent him down to mid-jonidan.


Fractured right wrist if I remember correctly. He was still doing the basics in keiko (picture from June 2016) but obviously not full contact work and had to sit it out for a while.

Thanks for the excellent round-up as always.

Edited by Yubinhaad
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The lineups for Hatsu 2018:

Tier 1 (Q) - Following up on his impressive upper-makushita debut, Shonannoumi has now reached an area full of highly experienced rikishi. Will it be "only" a learning experience or can he keep moving up? Kotokamatani and Ryuko have both reached the middle of the division for the first time and should find themselves challenged as well.

Tier 2 (Q) - Takayoshitoshi is again the highest-ranked member of this section, but has yet to truly look like a promotion contender. Consequently the main attention will probably be back on Kiribayama whose 6-1 Kyushu record has still left him a bit short of his pre-injury area on the rankings, so another good record may be in the offing. Nishikifuji was the other standout performer of the previous tournament and he'll probably have his hands full this time.

Tier 3 (Q) - This may well be the most interesting group this time around, courtesy of Enho and Murata standing just outside the promotion zone and potentially only one small KK away from challenging for juryo spots in March. Perennial contender Hakuyozan is also back to single-digits yet again, hoping to finally break through. Last basho's sandanme playoff participants Tomokaze and Tsuyukusa both make their makushita debuts after receiving the usual sizable 7-0 boosts. Shikona change note: Kaiseio is now known as Kaisho.

Tier 4 (Q) - We've got no less than 6 rikishi in the top 15 ranks here, the most it's been since Aki 2016, with Wakamotoharu leading the way. At Ms6 he's unlikely to figure into the promotion race though, and all others would definitely need the zensho, so this should be a building block basho for our elder prospects. Once highly regarded collegiate prospect Chiyonoumi is second on the tier listing and at a career-best rank, and he'll be keen to continue to prove that his injury woes have not resulted in a loss of sekitori upside.

Edited by Asashosakari
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The Hatsu results round-up...

Tier 1:

With three of our top prospect at career-high positions, it was always going to be an uphill battle to kachikoshi this time. However, the actual path taken was rather surprising in the end, with both Shonannoumi and Kotokamatani picking up 4-bout losing streaks but still finishing with respectable 3-4 records. Shonannoumi looked pretty good opening up the basho with 3 straight wins, then just seemed to run into a bunch of opponents he's not quite equipped to handle yet, while Kotokamatani continued his pattern of looking physically overmatched against ríkishi he ought to be capable of dealing with.

In better news Hatsu basho was another strong tournament for Ryuko who easily cleared another KK record to run his debut streak to 6, and he'll now be passing Kotokamatani to become our official #2 prospect for the first time. Kirinoryu struggled to 3 wins in sandanme and looks like a Tier 2 guy in all but name by now, almost certainly unable to get into the conversation for the next youngest sekitori.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Hatsu 2018 - Tier 1: Top Talents - current yardstick: Takagenji (1997/05/13, debut 2013.03, shin-juryo 2017.05)
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11 2018.01
Shonannoumi Takadagawa 1998/04/08 (3) 2014.03 Ms9 Ms40e 3-4 Ms48e 1-6 Sd23e 6-1 Ms44w 6-1 Ms18w 5-2 Ms9e 3-4
Kotokamatani Sadogatake 1997/11/19 (4) 2015.11 Ms27 Sd3w 5-2 Ms46e 4-3 Ms36w 2-5 Ms53w 4-3 Ms45e 5-2 Ms27w 3-4
Ryuko Onoe 1998/06/23 (2) 2017.01 Ms30 Jk15w 6-1 Jd31e 6-1 Sd66w 6-1 Sd11w 5-2 Ms50e 5-2 Ms30w 5-2
Kirinoryu Michinoku 1997/06/13 (5) 2013.03 Ms52 Sd50e 5-2 Sd24e 5-2 Ms60e 4-3 Ms52w 1-6 Sd22w 4-3 Sd8e 3-4
Yokuyusei Shibatayama 1998/09/10 (1) 2014.03 Ms58 Sd21w 5-2 Ms58e 2-5 Sd26w 0-0-7 Sd86w 0-0-7 Jd46w 0-0-7 Jk11w 0-0-7


Sadly, Yokuyusei decided to call it quits following (presumably) injury at just 19 years of age, so we've lost the currently youngest rikishi with makushita experience. However, a new age #1 has secured a surprising debut:

Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11 2018.01
Tochikodai Kasugano 1999/01/09 2017.03 Sd71 Mz 2-1 Jk12w 5-2 Jd70e 5-2 Jd27e 5-2 Sd90w 4-3 Sd71w 7-0 D

The lower half of sandanme has a habit of producing unexpected 7-0's, and like his predecessors Tochikodai will almost certainly also struggle in makushita. That said, the Hatsu bouts we have video for showed some remarkable patience for a new guy still in his first year as a pro, although it's clear that physically he's really not much more than a mid-sandanme rikishi at the moment, and I fear that his style of trying to outlast his opponents won't play very well after the jump up the rankings. In any case, while he's only 26 wins into his career so far and the usual caveats apply, it probably doesn't happen too often that somebody has okuridashi as his joint most frequent winning technique. All that aside, he has become the first 1999-born rikishi to reach makushita, beating out perennial contender Inoue who I actually had tabbed for those honours. 

Edited by Asashosakari
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Tier 2:

One of two surprise juryo promotions was secured in this section, courtesy of Takayoshitoshi grabbing one of the multitude of open slots available after Hatsu basho. He's now joining twin brother Takagenji up in the paid ranks, although it seems somewhat doubtful that he'll manage to stick. Still, congrats!

It was a rather middling tournament for our second-tier denizens altogether, with the highlight being Gokushindo's impressive 6-1 record, continuing his streak of alternating 6-win basho with makekoshi. I suppose any sort of continued advancement is good, although it definitely means he's constantly being challenged by opponents far beyond what he's experienced previously.

Four rikishi (aside from Takayoshitoshi) were at career-high ranks, and only Takakento managed to post a kachikoshi record. Midorifuji fell one win short, and his stablemate Nishikifuji was a victim of the flu going around Isegahama-beya and had to settle for a 1-win performance that included two missed matches. (He ought to be a good bet for a big Haru performance now.) Last not least, our makushita rookie Taichiyama who had a really tough time in his debut and ended up as the unfortunate sole 0-7 in the division. (In fact, it's his second 0-7 in the past year...) Time to regroup and stage a hopefully more successful second assault on division three.
 

Heisei Hopefuls for Hatsu 2018 - Tier 2: Promising Youngsters - Age 21 and under
Rikishi Heya DOB Debut HiRk 2017.03 2017.05 2017.07 2017.09 2017.11 2018.01
Takayoshitoshi Takanohana 1997/05/13 (6) 2013.03 Ms7 Ms11e 2-5 Ms25e 4-3 Ms21e 4-3 Ms15w 4-3 Ms11w 4-3 Ms7e 5-2
Gokushindo Nishikido 1996/06/06 (14) 2012.03 Ms12 Sd13w 6-1 Ms38e 6-1 Ms16e 2-5 Ms31w 6-1 Ms12w 3-4 Ms17w 6-1
Kiribayama Michinoku 1996/04/24 (17) 2015.05 Ms10 Ms12w 3-4 Ms18e 6-1 Ms10e 3-4 Ms14w 0-1-6 Ms49w 6-1 Ms21w 4-3
Nishikifuji Isegahama 1996/07/22 (11) 2016.09 Ms23 Sd19e 3-4 Sd38w 5-2 Sd13e 4-3 Sd2w 4-3 Ms52w 6-1 Ms23w 1-5-1
Takakento Takanohana 1996/02/10 (18) 2014.01 Ms24 Sd8e 4-3 Ms59e 5-2 Ms39e 3-4 Ms48w 5-2 Ms34w 5-2 Ms24w 4-3
Oki Shikoroyama 1996/06/12 (13) 2013.07 Ms25 Ms42w 3-4 Ms54w 4-3 Ms43w 4-3 Ms36e 5-2 Ms25e 3-4 Ms32w 2-5
Midorifuji Isegahama 1996/08/30 (10) 2016.09 Ms39 Sd19w 5-2 Ms57w 4-3 Ms46w 3-4 Ms57e 4-3 Ms46e 4-3 Ms39e 3-4
Kaito Asakayama 1996/06/19 (12) 2012.05 Ms20 Ms32w 5-2 Ms20e 2-5 Ms42w 5-2 Ms27w 4-3 Ms22e 2-5 Ms40e 4-3
Taichiyama Chiganoura 1997/04/21 (7) 2013.03 Ms45 Sd55w 6-1 Sd3w 0-7 Sd53w 4-3 Sd35w 4-3 Sd24w 6-1 Ms45e 0-7
Nakazono Nishonoseki 1996/05/18 (15) 2012.03 Ms11 Sd2w 6-1 Ms29e 6-1 Ms11w 0-0-7 Ms51w 4-3 Ms41w 3-4 Ms52w 4-3
Honda Nishikido 1997/03/11 (8) 2012.03 Ms42 Ms52w 2-5 Sd17w 5-2 Ms54e 2-5 Sd20w 6-1 Ms42e 3-4 Ms54w 4-3
Onojo Takadagawa 1996/01/31 (19) 2011.05 Ms60 Sd53w 5-2 Sd27e 3-4 Sd48e 3-4 Sd70e 4-3 Sd51e 5-2 Sd20w 4-3
Yamatoarashi Shikoroyama 1996/05/11 (16) 2012.03 Ms49 Sd33e 4-3 Sd18w 4-3 Sd7e 5-2 Ms49e 3-4 Ms59w 2-5 Sd22w 4-3
Ohata Tokitsukaze 1996/10/24 (9) 2014.11 Ms40 Sd32w 6-1 Ms49w 4-3 Ms40e 2-5 Sd1e 2-5 Sd24e 2-5 Sd50w 3-4


Takakento and Onojo have turned 22 and will have to continue in Tier 3. While Takakento looks like he may well be competing for juryo honours over the next two years, it would appear that the prospect shine has already come off Onojo.

No newcomers for Haru basho.

Edited by Asashosakari
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