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John Gunning

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No idea if this is actually some kind of a record, but when I think of Chiyonofuji, I would guess, he got the most Gino-shos in one year.

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Chiyonofuji is the only one of this list to have been promoted ozeki and yokozuna in the same year.

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Chiyonofuji holds the distinction of being the only one of the following list to have achieved what feat within one calendar year?

Are you sure it is a "calendar year" and not a "12-months period?"

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May not be the answer but in 1981 he won 3 Yusho's in 3 different ranks(Sekiwake,Ozeki,Yokozuna).

Edited by Fujisan

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no loss in the kokugikan?
I still like this answer, although slightly wrong. How about "winning 44 bouts in the kokugikan" as he did in 1985. Not even Asashoryu managed this in his miracle year ("only" 43), shared by Kitanoumi in 1978 (assuming the schedule of venues was the same back then).

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no loss in the kokugikan?
I still like this answer, although slightly wrong. How about "winning 44 bouts in the kokugikan" as he did in 1985. Not even Asashoryu managed this in his miracle year ("only" 43), shared by Kitanoumi in 1978 (assuming the schedule of venues was the same back then).

Don't forget Takanohana who was quite famous for the difference between basho in the Kokugikan and in the Chiho... he won six yusho in Tokyo before getting the first away, immediately giving him the yokozuna promotion. As for the number of wins, he was 43-2 with 3 yusho in 1994, 42-3 with 3 yusho in 1995 and 43-2 with 2 yusho in 1996 (lost a 14-1 playoff against Takanonami in Hatsu).

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yes he said a calendar year.

Given that there have only been around 50 '6 basho a year' years in the 250 years sumo has been documented by the NSK (20% of the grand total) and that of the four yokozuna in post at the start of the first '6 per year' year, two had packed it in by the end of that year (1958) leaving the 44th and 45th plus one other in post IIRC, of the 68 yokozuna to date we can only surmise that 25 (of the 68) have even had a chance to achieve this record on a level dohyo.

Several won fewer yusho than I have wrinkles on my forehead and Chiyonofuji's 1981 stats must be considered alongside the lack of a full quota of yokozuna for 5 of the 6 basho and himself as literal lone yokozuna wolf in the 'record' sealing Kyushu Basho in Novemeber of that year.

Impressive as it is - things look differently when considering all angles - and now you know the rest of the story - as PH would say. :-(

Edited by Adachinoryu

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:-( nice one. yeah the guy said he took the yusho at sekiwake, ozeki and yokozuna in one year.

Thanks I wish I could say I knew before but I just looked for something unusual in his records on Chiyozakuras site and thats what stuck out.

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i don't think chiyozakuras site would technically be "your own memory / intuition" (Dancing of joy...)

I almost forgot where the link was,does that count? (Punk rocker...)

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I really don't know, but Chiyonofuji was perhaps the fittest rikishi ever to wrestle for the Kyokai. He was reputed to regularly do 500 pushups a day during his prime years. I used to read about him and his exploits in the Sumo World magazine back in the early 1990s. It's amazing to think that he achieved so much while never weighing more than 280 lbs. at any point in his career. He typically weighed between 260 and 270 lbs. while he was a yokozuna. He also got stronger after the age of 30 and was at his peak at around 32 or 33 years old. Chiyonofuji is the main reason that I became a serious sumo fan back in the early 1990s.

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I'm very happy to know that there is a new Chiyonofuji fan on this forum!

Personally, I think that his peak was 1982 and 1983.

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