Sign in to follow this  
Tetsuzukiyama

'Three Factions' article

Recommended Posts

...but this guy really seems to know what he's talking about.
Uh-huh. At least that's what he wants to make us believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They didn't even bother to reproduce the original Shukan Post byline (assuming it carried one), all they're listing is the guy who translated it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They didn't even bother to reproduce the original Shukan Post byline (assuming it carried one), all they're listing is the guy who translated it.

That's from the Shukan Post? Well, screw it. It's frickin' guesswork at what parts are real and what parts are totally made up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't the Shukan Post known for making a river from a trickle, and sometimes even starting the river from scratch??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isn't the Shukan Post known for making a river from a trickle, and sometimes even starting the river from scratch??

Let's put it this way. Takanohana, the poster boy for yokozuna hinkaku, once slapped a Shukan Post photographer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering this is the Shukan Post, that artical should probably be titled:

"The Fabricated truth behind Roho vs. Chiyotaikai"

Edited by Zentoryu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm actually registered on that site, as well. For the first time, I got to be the first one to make a comment. Yeahh. I'm chuffed. Where's my chuffty badge?

:-P

FWIW, this is what I posted.

Roho is clearly wrong. He does need to show repect in the ring, before and after the match. Sumo has a long, long history and he can't just make up his own rules and etiquette.

He will be brought to heel, or he will get his ill-mannered, petulant ass sent back to Russia. That's the bottom line. It's called 'Grand Sumo', not 'The Roho Show'.

Edited by Shibouyama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's from the Shukan Post? Well, screw it. It's frickin' guesswork at what parts are real and what parts are totally made up.

Quote from the article:

Roho is a former wrestling world champion.

Can someone help me with the frickin' guesswork? :-P :-P :-S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Let's put it this way. Takanohana, the poster boy for yokozuna hinkaku, once slapped a Shukan Post photographer.

Excuse me, :) language question from one who wanna learn: With hinkaku you mean 品格 ? " ideal Yokozuna", do I get it right? Something similar to 範 ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's put it this way. Takanohana, the poster boy for yokozuna hinkaku, once slapped a Shukan Post photographer.

Excuse me, :) language question from one who wanna learn: With hinkaku you mean 品格 ? " ideal Yokozuna", do I get it right? Something similar to 範 ?

Ja, stimmt!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sumo's image takes it on the chin

By MARK SCHREIBER

"Nanda -- kora! (Hey! What the hell?!)"

On the seventh day of the recently ended Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament, ozeki (champion) Chiyotaikai, using his patented pushing technique, propelled lower-ranked grappler Roho into the third row of spectator seats. Rather than accept defeat stoically, the Russian glared angrily at his opponent, prompting the highly unusual (for sumo) verbal outburst.

Returning to the dressing room in a huff, Roho smashed a glass panel in the door to the bathing area with his fist, and then turned his fury on two news photographers bent on recording his tantrum for posterity.

Understandably aghast over these violations of protocol, the Sumo Association smacked Roho with an unprecedented three-day suspension. His stablemaster Ootake -- former sekiwake (junior champion) Takatoriki -- was slapped with a three-month wage cut.

Shukan Taishu (Aug. 7) notes things could have been much worse -- criminal law provides for fines and/or imprisonment in cases of assault -- if the cameramen had pressed charges.

The 13 Europeans currently in professional sumo, the magazine suggests, were moved to seek their fortunes in Japan out of largely economic concerns. "Efforts to coach them on proper decorum are useless," contends a sports reporter.

Fans of the sport now fear the "show-style sumo" favored by the Europeans may eventually catch on among up-and-coming Japanese grapplers.

"People have already begun to criticize Kisenosato, who's regarded as a future hopeful among Japanese rikishi (wrestlers), for his menacing glare during bout preliminaries," says a sumo insider. "This may be rubbing off from watching the K1 fighting on TV."

The frictions, moreover, are not limited to Japanese, but also occur between foreigners of different nationalities. At exhibition bouts held in April 2005, Roho had been reprimanded by Mongolian yokozuna (grand champion) Asashoryu -- who himself has been known to raise hackles for loutish behavior -- for lack of proper deference in the ring.

Shukan Post (Aug. 4) suggests the spat between Roho and Chiyotaikai may have roots in long-standing adversarial relationships between their stablemasters, who exhort their wards to act as surrogates in the ring.

"Someone apparently circulated a rumor that Roho had been scouted by a K1 fight promoter, which led to his being chewed out by his stablemaster," says a sportswriter. "Roho traced the rumor to a supporter of Chiyotaikai and became infuriated."

According to Weekly Playboy (Aug. 7), Roho, despite his menacing mien, is actually quite easygoing. But before taking up sumo, relates sportswriter Reiko Yokono, he allegedly had some close shaves while working as a bodyguard at a gambling casino run by the Russian mafia.

"What's more, he came up in the ranks really fast," says Yokono. "Even if more time had been devoted to teaching him proper sumo decorum, I suppose his rough-and-tumble background would make him a difficult study."

In Russia, notes Yomiuri Weekly (Aug. 6), Roho's run-in with Chiyotaikai received nearly as much media coverage as Zidane's infamous headbutt in the recent 2006 World Cup final.

One repercussion of Roho's outburst was to discredit stablemaster Taiho -- an all-time sumo great who himself is of half-Russian origin -- and who had taken Roho under his wing when he arrived in Japan.

"Roho not only needs to be strong in the ring, but also to be an upright competitor," Yomiuri Weekly opines. "That will make sufficient amends to his mentor."

The Japan Times: Sunday, July 30, 2006

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't the Shukan Post known for making a river from a trickle, and sometimes even starting the river from scratch??

Let's put it this way. Takanohana, the poster boy for yokozuna hinkaku, once slapped a Shukan Post photographer.

Gee, how come Takanohana didn't get a 3-day suspension then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't the Shukan Post known for making a river from a trickle, and sometimes even starting the river from scratch??

Let's put it this way. Takanohana, the poster boy for yokozuna hinkaku, once slapped a Shukan Post photographer.

Gee, how come Takanohana didn't get a 3-day suspension then?

'Cause the Shukan Post is that bad. (I am not worthy...)

Edit: Seriously, he didn't get a suspension because it wasn't during a basho, and the incident happened in front of Takanohana's house, where he was bringing his wife and new baby home from the hospital.

Edited by Hananotaka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this