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Kaikitsune Makoto

Kimarite stats in 2003 so far with comments

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Updates covering kimarite stats has been done and hence interested human

beings can take a look at my website. This time kimarite stats is

presented in a new, adventurous and ground breaking format! Explanation of

this revolutionary technique will now follow.

There are 6 honbasho per year and we can intuitively assume that every

single honbasho has homogenic expectations when it comes to kimarite

frequency distribution. In other words for example kakenage usage should

not depend on where the honbasho is held. Now the revolutionary part of

this new method is revealed. Drums roll, cats freeze in position and get

torsoically hairbally, Kintamayama-zeki stares at the screen in great

anticipation right hand frozen on mouse, Mats Sundin stops for a fraction

of a second dreaming about his 1991 glorious moments, raindrops decelerate

in order not to miss the revelation due to noisy contacts with obstacles,

earthquakes pause, SARS viruses stops attacking alveolies and asteroids

lean towards the Earth sensitizing their steamy but rocky ears.

Three (3) honbasho has been finished for 2003. 3 is yet to come. I will

multiply the sum frequencies of Hatsu, Haru and Natsu with 2 in order to

get an estimation of the final amount in various kimarite this year then

comparing the expected frequencies to actual frequencies of year 2002.

Naturally with rare kimarite this is a questionable technique which

carries no deeper interpretation due to random affect in low frequency

stuff. For example it is extremely unlikely that we will see another

koshinage in 2003 but as it was seen once already, the estimation

technique gives 2 as year 2003 estimate.

In parenthesis are the estimated final difference expectations compared to

2002

Yorikiri 219 => 438 (+51)

This is quite clear development. I'd bet anything in favour of yorikiri

being much more common this year than in 2002 as there were only 387

yorikiri then.

Oshidashi 165 => 330 (-63)

The opposite compared to yorikiri. If we consider the fact that in 2002

oshidashi was more used in makuuchi than yorikiri for the first time in

probably ever, it is safe to say that this was a statistical fluke and

yorikiri will regain the crown. Throne of blood is a Kurosawa movie.

Hatakikomi, hikiotoshi and tsukiotoshi (representing a moderately accurate

estimate of slap/pulldowns techniques) together: 151 => 302 (-30)

Hikiotoshi 60 => 120 (+7)

Hatakikomi 55 => 110 (-16)

Tsukiotoshi 36 => 72 (-21)

There is a decline in these too. Natsu basho was hikiotoshi's prime. A

disturbing amount of 26 hikiotoshi was seen in Natsu. Most notable ones

were Kyokushuzan's upset over Asashoryu and KaioU's dominating hikiotoshi

against Chiyotaikai. Also hatakikomi was popular as 20 bouts were decided

by hatakikomi. Tochiazuma's ozekihood saving super henka on day 14 annoyed

Miyabiyama and some other representatives of mankind. Tsukiotoshi can have

more astute and strong characteristics in general. Musoyama beat both

Chiyotaikai and KaioU with tsukiotoshi.

Out of 55 hatakikomi in 2003 so far, Gojoro has 9! Hikiotoshi has been

used 60 times out of which Shuzan's 8 constitutes 13.3%. Gojoro doesn't

have a single win with hikiotoshi! I guess he is so tall that he can

mostly slap down without pulling.

Uwatenage 46 => 92 (+-0)

Sadogatake-duo Kotonowaka (4) and Kotoryu (6) are the most active

uwatenage winner this year so far. KaioU has 3 devastating uwatenage wins

(Shimotori, Kotonowaka and Asashoryu)

Oshitaoshi+Yoritaoshi 44 => 88 (-24)

Shitatenage+Sukuinage 37 => 74 (+10)

Tochinonada has the strongest left hand shitatenage in ozumo and he has

used that 3 times in 2003 so far.

Okuridashi 31 => 62 (+9)

Okuritaoshi 10 => 20 (+10)

Okuritaoshi has a peak. In 1994 there were 20 bouts finished with

okuritaoshi and now the pace is estimating similar frequency. Asashoryu

has two magnificent okuritaoshi victories on his belt this year against

Miyabiyama and Wakanosato. In Natsu basho Aminishiki made Yotsukasa a

passenger and in one of the most amusing bouts of some time; he ran

Yotsukasa to tawara from behind using the whole diameter of the dohyo to

that. Yotsukasa then collapsed there.

Kotenage 20 => 40 (+15)

Kotenage is in fashion now! Kasugao's makuuchi debut brought a good

kotenage user in makuuchi as he has already 4. Asashoryu, Toki(!),

Takanonami and Iwakiyama all have 2 kotenage wins. Takanonami still is the

leading kotenage expert in ozumo and has crept further away from KaioU who

hasn't used his dreaded kotenage at all this year yet! Iwakiyama seems to

have kotenage in his spinal cord so along with Kasugao, he will be one of

the rikishi whose presence upholds the honour of kotenage. Most notable

kotenage of 2003 have been Kotonowaka's rare kotenage against Asashoryu

and Gojoro's KaioU-like brutal kotenage against Wakanoyama on day 15 Natsu

basho.

Tsukidashi 19 => 38 (-7)

Tsukitaoshi 1 => 2 (+-0)

Last year was a big year in tsukidashi-frequency but now the frenquecy

appears to have been settling to average level. Musahimaruless makuuchi

has Hokutoriki as the rikishi whose main weapon is tsukidashi. He has 7

tsukidashi wins which is about 37% of all tsukidashi! Chiyotaikai has only

2 tsukidashi wins so far. Gojoro comes in second with 4 tsukidashi wins.

Toki's modest 1 tsukidashi suggests to two things:

a) His strength isn't usually enough to beat his foes with forward sumo

b) He knows that and has gained formidable skill in combination push-pull

attacks

Uwatedashinage+Shitatedashinage 16 => 32 (+4)

Aminishiki's technical reportoire consists of all sorts of wrigglings,

throws and trips but his 3 uwatedashinage in 2003 have all been examples

of how to execute this throw in Style. Miyabiyama on day 1 in Haru,

Takanowaka on day 1 in Natsu and especially the dohyo art exhibit on

senshuraku against Tochinonada. This bout is one that every

self-respecting sumofan should download from Dale and watch in revered

silence. Ozumo art at its best when it comes to balanced movement and

unmatched technical masterfullness! Wakanosato is the other

uwatedashinage user who also has 3 wins in 2003 against good foes (10-ho,

Kotonowaka and Musoyama) and his dashinage has more of that massive power

he possesses. Out of 11 uwatedashinage in 2003 so far, 6 is work of these

two. Wakanosato also threw Tosanoumi in Natsu with a neat shitatedashinage

but all the other 4 shitatedashinage in 2003 has been recorded after

Tokitsuumi's win. Out of his 13 wins in 2003 (only 13 because he got

injured in Haru) 6 is shitate-X!

http://banzuke.com/sumomovies/natsu2003/150105mov.html (Ami vs NAda)

Leg tripping techniques: 16 => 32 (+11)

Sotogake 9 => 18 (+9)

Kirikaeshi 4 => 8 (+1)

Uchigake 2 => 4 (+2)

Kawazugake 1 => 2 (+2)

Ketaguri 0 => 0 (-2)

Chongake 0 => 0 (-1)

Whereas chongake and ketaguri have yet to be seen this year, sotogake has

been very popular this year. Asashoryu likes sotogake and has 3 wins.

Aminishiki has two sotogake-wins against Jumonji who is the lower

maegashira who doesn't defend well against sotogake. In addition to

Aminishiki's 2 wins against him, he has also lost to Asasekiryu and Kaiho

with sotogake. Takanonami's sotogake is always spectacular as was once

again seen in Natsu when he toppled Tochiazuma with a menacing one.

All 4 kirikaeshi bouts have been exciting if dohyo impact "ippon-ism" and

devastation are criteria. Kaiho vs Tokitsuumi on senshuraku in Hatsu,

Asasekiryu's marathon bout ending against Kotonowaka on day 14 in Haru and

Asashoryu's Dejima-dumping day after he lost to Shuzan in Natsu.

Uchigake is a beauty. Kasugao and Kaiho brought this to highlight on day 9

in Hatsu basho beating Kasuganishiki and Asashoryu respectively. These two

rikishi are currently the only ones in makuuchi who really go for this

technique regularly.

Asasekiryu's kawazugake was the second of his sekitori career (once in

juryo) and a clean one! For your kimarite collections (who has one?..raise

hands!!..Oh...well anyways...) you must immediately download that bout!

http://banzuke.com/sumomovies/hatsu2003/130103mov.html

Leg grapping techniques komatasukui, sotokomata and uchimuso were seen 8

times in 2002 but not once yet in 2003. Watashikomi is the only leg

grapping technique that has been witnessed in 2003 too.

Fusensho 14 => 28 (+5)

Despite that stomach chilling figure it took a turn to better in Natsu

where only 3 real injury-related withdrawals were seen (Akinoshima's was

the 4th(.

This year the following body parts have caused withdrawals in the middle

of basho:

Shoulder: 4 (Takanohana, Tochiazuma, Musoyama and Takanotsuru)

Knee: 3 (Takekaze also got ankle injury in addition to knee injury and

Tamakasuga had meniscus damage in knee. Takanowaka also aggravated his

knee in addition to rib injury))

Ankle 1 (Miyabiyama and 2 if Takekaze counted to this category also)

Yokozuna pride: 1 (Takanohana's intai)

Akinoshima pride: 1 (Akinoshima's intai)

Lower back: 1 (Iwakiyama)

Thigh : 1 (Tokitsuumi's torn thigh flexor)

Rib: 1 (Shimotori)

Elbow(s):1 Kotomitsuki

Rare throws 7 => 14 (+3)

Kakenage 4 => 8 (+5)

Kubinage 1 => 2 (-3)

Utchari 1 => 2 (-1)

Koshinage 1 => 2 (+2)

All 4 kakenage are worthwhile mentioning! Kaiho flipped Aminishiki with a

completely airborne kakenage on day 4 in Hatsu. Kyokutenho upset Asashoryu

with another airborne kakenage on day 3 in Haru causing the first kinboshi

given up by the oven fresh yokozuna. Two days later Kaiho did a slow

motion kakenage on 10-ho and on day 14 Aminishiki was astute as ever with

his combination attack against Nami resulting in kakenage.

Wakanosato's koshinage against Kaiho on day 10 in Hatsu was a display of

immense power. Downloadable on Dale's site too.

Tsuridashi 5 => 10 (+5)

Shitatehineri 4 => 8 (+4)

Katasukashi 4 => 8 (-5)

Tochinonada's aikido show on day 8 in Natsu against Nada is an example of

Shuzan at his best. His pulling sumo may be annoying but this technique

was in parts and as smoothly performed as possible. It was recongnized as

katasukashi but the kimarite compilation oddly lacks this kind of inside

dohyo hikkake type of arm grabbing technique!

Watashikomi 3 => 6 (+4)

Hikkake 3 => 6 (+4)

Abisetaoshi 2 => 4 (+1)

Tokitsuumi will remember his abisetaoshi loss against Nami in Haru...

Makiotoshi 2 => 4 (-3)

Tottari 1 => 2 (+-0)

Harimanage 1 => 2 (+2)

This was last seen in makuuchi in 1996 when Terao beat Naminohana.

Shuzan does this sort of reaching the belt and dragging foe down but

usually it is inside the dohyo hence not qualifiyng for harimanage.

Sokubiotoshi 1 => 2 (+2)

Okurihikiotoshi 1 => 2 (+-0))

Kimedashi 1 => 2 (-2)

I rest my case.

Today's word of interest as ASTUTE.

(Baby sucking a pacifier...) (Chased by the fans...) (Releasing bad air...)

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Wow! (Releasing bad air...) That is awesome! (Chased by the fans...) (Sign of approval)

Just yesterday I was thinking to myself it's too bad I haven't found a site that tracks kimarite frequencies. As you may have noticed, I'm fond of rare kimarites and scour the lower divisions (where they seem to occur more often) results all the time.

Thank you Kaikitsune Makoto for fulfilling this analysis craving of mine! (Baby sucking a pacifier...) Where is the URL to your site?

As an aside, it seems only makuuchi kimarite are analyzed. I can see how analyzing all divisions would be much more time-consuming (Happy goodbyes...)

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Thank you Mikko for a very detailed analysis!

The only thing that I don't understand is why you put oshitaoshi and yoritaoshi stats together. These kimarite are very different.

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Juryo kimarite stats wouldn't be such a tough task but so far I haven't had the impetus of working on those. In the future this is on my sumo agenda list though and shall inform the civilization when I get those stats done.

The only thing that I don't understand is why you put oshitaoshi and yoritaoshi stats together. These kimarite are very different.

Good point (Baby sucking a pacifier...)

I had a plan bundling yorikiri and yoritaoshi together and respectively oshidashi+oshitaoshi but I forgot the whole idea in the process and for some reason put oshitaoshi+yoritaoshi together. It is true that combining taoshi with corresponding kiri would have shed more light on yori/oshi-sumo rivalry.

Yoritaoshi 8

Oshitaoshi 10

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Good point (Baby sucking a pacifier...)

I had a plan bundling yorikiri and yoritaoshi together and respectively oshidashi+oshitaoshi but I forgot the whole idea in the process and for some reason put oshitaoshi+yoritaoshi together. It is true that combining taoshi with corresponding kiri would have shed more light on yori/oshi-sumo rivalry.

Exactly.

Since yorikiri/yoritaoshi and various dashi/taoshi techniques are essentially the same from the attacker's side. To step out or to fall down usually depends more on the receiving rikishi...

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Okuritaoshi has a peak. In 1994 there were 20 bouts finished with

okuritaoshi and now the pace is estimating similar frequency. Asashoryu

has two magnificent okuritaoshi victories on his belt this year against

Miyabiyama and Wakanosato.

That okuritaoshi against Sato essentially secured his yokozuna promotion. Truly a memorable bout.

In Natsu basho Aminishiki made Yotsukasa a

passenger and in one of the most amusing bouts of some time; he ran

Yotsukasa to tawara from behind using the whole diameter of the dohyo to

that. Yotsukasa then collapsed there.

He had the same thing against Toki on Day 8 of Kyushu 2002.

Hokutoriki as the rikishi whose main weapon is tsukidashi. He has 7

tsukidashi wins which is about 37% of all tsukidashi! Chiyotaikai has only

2 tsukidashi wins so far. Gojoro comes in second with 4 tsukidashi wins.

Tsukidashi is hard to do against strong opponents. The left-right rhythmical thrust is an excellent way to unbalance your foe, but it's hard to push someone out using just that. Seems that in his Juryo and early Makuuchi days, Chiyotaikai often had had more tsukidashi wins than oshidashi wins, and he still often starts his bouts like that, but in the end throws a two-handed thrust or utilizes his entire weight for a push, which turns it into oshidashi.

Toki's modest 1 tsukidashi suggests to two things:

a) His strength isn't usually enough to beat his foes with forward sumo

And it always amazes me how someone as big as Toki can't just bulldoze most of the smaller maegashira rikishi out of the ring.

Leg tripping techniques: 16 => 32 (+11)

Sotogake 9 => 18 (+9)

Kirikaeshi 4 => 8 (+1)

I hate those. >(Baby sucking a pacifier...) (Sign of disapproval) Just today my friend tried to do one of these against me, so I got pissed and threw him down with something which could have been sukuinage if someone was in the room to judge it.

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I like leg-tripping and other rare techniques. It's a refreshing change from constant yorikiri / oshidashi sumo. (Bleh!)

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Tsukidashi is hard to do against strong opponents. The left-right rhythmical thrust is an excellent way to unbalance your foe, but it's hard to push someone out using just that. Seems that in his Juryo and early Makuuchi days, Chiyotaikai often had had more tsukidashi wins than oshidashi wins, and he still often starts his bouts like that, but in the end throws a two-handed thrust or utilizes his entire weight for a push, which turns it into oshidashi.

I agree. Akebono used to be like this. I can remember seeing him start a number of bouts with Tsuki, backing his opponents to the edge before finishing them off with one mighty shove. This would of course, turn the kimarite into Oshidashi instead of Tsukidashi (even though Tsuki was his primary weapon in the bout) (Baby sucking a pacifier...) .

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I like leg-tripping (...)

Me too! I've been waiting someone like Mainoumi to emerge again. Someone who'd be utterly unpredictable with ability to change the course of the bout in split second from a standard oshi or yotsu battle into a leg trip or grab. To see a kawazugake even once in live web feed... (Baby sucking a pacifier...)

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To see a kawazugake even once in live web feed...

Didnt you see Asasekiryu vs Oginishiki on day 6 of kyushu basho 2002? (Baby sucking a pacifier...)

It's even avaliable for download on dale's site.

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Didnt you see Asasekiryu vs Oginishiki on day 6 of kyushu basho 2002? :-D

I didn't :-( . I don't remember why. Probably I overslept as usual.

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I'll jut use this occasion to thank Kai-zeki for his more than interesting daily comments, kimarite stats, and erratic style. (Clapping wildly...)

You make this Forum an interesting place to visit... :-D

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I'll jut use this occasion to thank Kai-zeki for his more than interesting daily comments, kimarite stats, and erratic style. 

You make this Forum an interesting place to visit... 

I couldn't agree more... :-D

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