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Tsukinowa

Maezumo results

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[1]Kanekuni			   [2]Tsukamoto			 [3]Sawada
3 o oshidashi   Tateishi  3 o yorikiri   Oazuma	3 o uwatehineri Higashi
4 o yorikiri	Sawada	4 o yoritaoshi Otozai	4 x yorikiri	Kanekuni
5 o yoritaoshi  Sawada	5 o uwatenage  Sawada	4 o Kubinage	Tateno
											   5 x yoritaoshi  Kanekuni
											   5 x uwatenage   Tsukamoto
											   6 o uwatenage   Higashi

[4]Otozai				 [5]Higashi			   [6]Tateno
3 o yorikiri	Hata	  3 x uwatehineri Sawada   3 o abisetaoshi Asakomiya
4 x yoritaoshi  Tsukamoto 4 o yoritaoshi  Tateishi 4 x kubinage	Sawada
5 o oshidashi   Hata	  5 o yorikiri	Tateishi 5 x okuridashi  Oazuma
6 o okuridashi  Tateno	6 x uwatenage   Sawada   6 o tsukiotoshi Tateishi
											   6 x okuridashi  Otozai

[7]Hata				   [8]Oazuma				[9]Tateishi
3 x yorikiri	Otozai	3 x yorikiri   Tsukamoto 3 x oshidashi   Kanekuni
4 o oshitaoshi  Oazuma	4 x oshitaoshi Hata	  4 x yoritaoshi  Higashi
5 x oshidashi   Otozai	5 o okuridashi Tateno	5 x yorikiri	Higashi
6 o uwatenage   Oazuma	6 x uwatenage  Hata	  6 x tsukiotoshi Tateno

[10]Asakomiya
3 x abisetaoshi Tateno
4 -
5 -
6 -

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opinionaire

(What is this space??) (Nodding yes...) ARIGATO!

Shikona Aim Favorite subject Dislike subject Favorite food Dislike food Hobby Favorite talent
Shimoda Sekitori, Tochiazuma Gymnastics English Ramen [/td] Deep-sea fishing SUDO Genki
Kanekuni Mitoizumi Social studies (History) English
Tsukamoto Makuuchi, Higonoumi Social studies (History) English, Math Fish Manga Ronaldinho
Sawada Chiyotaikai Gymnastics English English (W00t, w00t, w00t...) meat Natto Video game
Otozai Yokozuna, Hakuho English meat zzz Hakuho
Higashi Natural science English, Math meat Pickled ume, kimchi
Tateno Terao art English. Math, Music Pizza music appreciation UETO Aya
Hata Terao National language, Math, English, Natural science, Social studies, Gymnastics, Music, Art meat fishing
Oazuma Juryo, Tochiazuma National language, Gymnastics English baked fish Watching a baseball on television Tochiazuma
Tateishi Kinkaiyama Natural science National language Fish Reading novels
Asakomiya Yokozuna (Asashoryu) Math English Kimchi Game of go, Reading
Edited by Tsukinowa

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What are the requirements to escape maezumo? I know that an entrant fights until he wins three matches in a basho. What is the status of those who do not win their three?

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English doesn't seem to be very popular among shin-deshi...

And Sawada likes to EAT English people.

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What are the requirements to escape maezumo?

AFAIK, participating in one maezumo bout.

English doesn't seem to be very popular among shin-deshi...

I'm instantly taking a liking to Hata, who apparently disliked everything in school. (W00t, w00t, w00t...)

And, interestingly there were five pairings that happened twice and they all ended up 2-0...

Edited by Asashosakari

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I would like to learn a bit more about Maezumo bouts. I would like to know why some rikishi have to fight against the same opponent instead of fighting against a new one, or why some rikishi have to fight three times, other have to do it five times and other only has to fight once. (W00t, w00t, w00t...)

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Shikona Aim Favorite subject Dislike subject Favorite food Dislike food Hobby Favorite talent
Tateishi Kinkaiyama Natural science National language Fish [/td] Reading novels

Kinkaiyama? So this guy must like elevators a lot. Also, he's the only one not to dislike the English language. I will cheer for this oddball. (Whatever above, it is funny...)

Maybe he will get a win in Jonukuchi, finally. (Nodding yes...)

Edited by Oimeru

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does the kyokai govern the maezumo? or are they slightly independant of the kyokai?

Of course mae-zumo is under total kyokai observance. It even counts as first basho (= hatsu-dohyo) in the career basho count. The structure of the torikumi set up just is totally different from regular divisional torikumi.

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I would like to learn a bit more about Maezumo bouts. I would like to know why some rikishi have to fight against the same opponent instead of fighting against a new one, or why some rikishi have to fight three times, other have to do it five times and other only has to fight once. (Whatever above, it is funny...)

I have noticed in the past that as soon as a new guy gets 3 wins, he is done competing. The others get anywhere from 5-7 matches. This is the first time I can recall seeing repeat matches. Agree we need some education on how Mae works.

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opinionaire

(What is this space??)

Firstly thanks for your contributions! They are very welcome!

Then to your question: This space is the result of a bug in the table code. You can work around that with not making any line breaks in the table. So the whole table code from [ table ] until [ /table ] should be a huge single line, then this empty space at the top won't happen.

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does the kyokai govern the maezumo? or are they slightly independant of the kyokai?

Of course mae-zumo is under total kyokai observance. It even counts as first basho (= hatsu-dohyo) in the career basho count. The structure of the torikumi set up just is totally different from regular divisional torikumi.

do you know why that is? possibly because there are too many people to have a standard divisional set up? do they draw opponents randomly? (the reason some people fight eachother more then once)

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Maezumo is held for the new recruits who passed the physical exam prior to the basho and rikishi who have been dropped off the banzuke (they go banzuke-gai due to injury), who are ready to return to action. In the old days, one had to win a stipulated number of bouts in order to "pass" maezumo. There are stories that former yokozuna Azumafuji and former sekiwake Dewanishiki took more than a year to get onto the banzuke. Today, there is no such requirement and all partipants in maezumo "graduate" to jonokuchi next basho.

In 1951, the Kyokai instituted the rule that a recruit must have finished junior high and, as a result, there would be a disproportionate number of shin-deshi for the March basho. Traditional mae-zumo was held in March every year but for the rest of the year, it was "show up and you're in." In 1986, the Kyokai did away with the old system entirely.

With the current system, a shin-deshi is done as soon as he wins three bouts. (Sometimes when there is a large group as this March, the requirement is two). The others continue until as many as possible within the time frame can reach the stipulate number of wins. The graduates are introduced in a ceremony held on Day 8. For the March basho with the large number of rookies, they graduate in groups. The "Ichiban Shusse," mostly those that win their required bouts right away are introduced on Day 5. The second group, "Niban Shusse" follows on Day 8. Often, there is a need a third group, "Sanban Shusse," for the stragglers that mostly don't reach the target wins. This March, a guy named Hirata led Group 3 with a record of 2-3. The low man on the totem pole, Sugishita, managed one victory. This group is introduced on Day 12. All the shin-deshi would be listed in jonokuchi on the next banzuke in accordance to the order in which they finish, which is not necessarily their record (for example a guy could reach 2 or 3 wins with one loss prior to another who has not lost).

As mentioned in an earlier post, mae-zumo is considered the debut basho and is counted as the first basho in a rikishi's career but his record during mae-zumo is not official. The whole process is pretty much an "exhibition" so it really doesn't matter who they face, in what order or whether they meet more than once. Even the resultant banzuke ranking means little because they are all bunched near the bottom anyways. If one does well in jonokuchi, a few mai-me wouldn't make much of a difference in his promotion prospects for the following basho.

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(Sign of approval)

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Then to your question: This space is the result of a bug in the table code.

Minor correction: not a bug in the table code per se, the script just converts every \n to

. There still isn't an official BBCode replacement for table tags. The alternative tag set (as seen above) was added by yours truly as a temporary replacement.

I'm instantly taking a liking to Hata, who apparently disliked everything in school. (Nodding yes...)

Me too. (Whistling...) And at 126 kg / 170 cm he's built for sumo. (Whatever above, it is funny...)

post-99-1148493023.jpg

Hata-san of Shikoroyama-beya, consider yourself adopted.

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post-99-1148493023.jpg

Is there anywhere one can see the uncensored version of this picture? (Is there a drooling icon??)

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opinionaire

(What is this space??)

Firstly thanks for your contributions! They are very welcome!

Then to your question: This space is the result of a bug in the table code. You can work around that with not making any line breaks in the table. So the whole table code from [ table ] until [ /table ] should be a huge single line, then this empty space at the top won't happen.

Or you can switch the post to "Raw linebreaks" mode, but then every intentional linebreak outside the table needs to be coded with

. (Or the depreciated

if you're lazy like me.)

And I'd like to second the thanks to Tsukinowa. (Sign of approval)

On a different topic, I think I'm able to say a few things about how the maezumo torikumi is made, as I reverse-engineered (so to speak) the big Haru basho torikumi from Tsukinowa's post last month. Due to the obvious size issues, I'm not going to use that as the demonstration object, but rather the 10-rikishi Natsu results.

A few general things:

  • The rikishi "rank" order in maezumo is identical to the order in which they're added to the Kyokai database, which presumably reflects the chronological order in which they were signed up to maezumo.
  • In general, the rikishi are matched up according to their records (just like in the toriteki divisions), although it's not handled quite as strictly, especially near the end of maezumo when the number of remaining rikishi becomes small.
  • When there is an odd number of rikishi active on a given day, the necessary extra rikishi is generally the highest-ranked guy who lost his regular bout on the day and has the same number of wins as the opponent, e.g. an excess rikishi at 1-0 would be facing a rikishi who fell to 1-1 earlier on the same day. Again, this doesn't necessarily hold completely true near the end of the competition.
  • The extra bout is a bonus for the rikishi who gets picked for it, and carries no negative consequences as far as his potential finishing spot in the maezumo competition is concerned. That can lead to e.g. a 3-1 rikishi finishing ahead of a 3-0 rikishi, as mado-san mentioned.
  • Obviously, repeated pairings are allowed, unlike in regular honbasho competition.

Here's the list of Natsu 2006 shindeshi from the Kyokai database, with "ranks" added to make the torikumi more readable later (the missing #2939 is tsukedashi Shimoda, btw):

#2937 Mz1 Higashi Takuma

#2938 Mz2 Sawada Toshiki

#2940 Mz3 Kanekuni Takatoshi

#2941 Mz4 Tateishi Kodai

#2942 Mz5 Tsukamoto Yuta

#2943 Mz6 Oazuma (Fukaya) Norihiro

#2944 Mz7 Asakomiya (Komiya) Masahiro

#2945 Mz8 Tateno Yu

#2946 Mz9 Hata Shota

#2947 Mz10 Otozai Yoshiki

Day 3 bouts (the pattern should be quite obvious):

Mz2  Sawada (1-0)	 uwatehineri  Mz1  Higashi (0-1)
Mz3  Kanekuni (1-0)   oshidashi	Mz4  Tateishi (0-1)
Mz5  Tsukamoto (1-0)  yorikiri	 Mz6  Oazuma (0-1)
Mz8  Tateno (1-0)	 abisetaoshi  Mz7  Asakomiya (0-1)	  Asakomiya leaves competition after bout
Mz10 Otozai (1-0)	 yorikiri	 Mz9  Hata (0-1)

leading to this hoshitori after the first round:

Mz1  Higashi	0-1
Mz2  Sawada	 1-0
Mz3  Kanekuni   1-0
Mz4  Tateishi   0-1
Mz5  Tsukamoto  1-0
Mz6  Oazuma	 0-1
Mz7  Asakomiya  0-1
Mz8  Tateno	 1-0
Mz9  Hata	   0-1
Mz10 Otozai	 1-0

Day 4 bouts:

Mz1  Higashi (1-1)	yoritaoshi   Mz4  Tateishi (0-2)
Mz3  Kanekuni (2-0)   yorikiri	 Mz2  Sawada (1-1)
Mz5  Tsukamoto (2-0)  yoritaoshi   Mz10 Otozai (1-1)
Mz9  Hata (1-1)	   oshitaoshi   Mz6  Oazuma (0-2)
Mz2  Sawada (2-1)	 kubinage	 Mz8  Tateno (1-1)		 extra bout for Sawada

Sawada was the highest-ranking 1-1 loser on this day, so he went into the extra bout. I'm not sure why they did Tsukamoto-Otozai here (the ranking order should have called for Tsukamoto-Tateno, with Otozai being left over to face Sawada instead), but hey, I don't claim to understand everything. (Whatever above, it is funny...) Anyway, the hoshitori after round 2:

Mz1  Higashi	1-1
Mz2  Sawada	 2-1
Mz3  Kanekuni   2-0
Mz4  Tateishi   0-2
Mz5  Tsukamoto  2-0
Mz6  Oazuma	 0-2
Mz7  Asakomiya  0-1-1
Mz8  Tateno	 1-1
Mz9  Hata	   1-1
Mz10 Otozai	 1-1

Day 5 bouts:

Mz1  Higashi (2-1)	yorikiri	 Mz4  Tateishi (0-3)
Mz3  Kanekuni (3-0)   yoritaoshi   Mz2  Sawada (2-2)		 Kanekuni qualified (#1)
Mz5  Tsukamoto (3-0)  uwatenage	Mz2  Sawada (2-3)		 extra bout for Sawada; Tsukamoto qualified (#2)
Mz6  Oazuma (1-2)	 okuridashi   Mz8  Tateno (1-2)
Mz10 Otozai (2-1)	 oshidashi	Mz9  Hata (1-2)

Kanekuni and Sawada were the highest-ranked rikishi at 2 wins, so they face each other again (their previous bout was on Day 3). After his loss, Sawada just so happens to be the highest-ranked losing rikishi at 2 wins (and the only one, of course), so he lucks into yet another extra bout, but loses it this time.

As three of the four 1-1 rikishi were from Shikoroyama-beya (Higashi, Tateno, Hata), they couldn't go with straight matchups by record, so the two 0-2 rikishi were put into the mix, having both 0-2 guys face off against 1-1 rikishi instead of each other. As a result, we have two more repeat bouts: Higashi-Tateishi (from Day 4), and Otozai-Hata (from Day 3).

The hoshitori now looks like this:

qualified:
#1  Mz3  Kanekuni   3-0
#2  Mz5  Tsukamoto  3-0

Mz1  Higashi	2-1
Mz2  Sawada	 2-3
Mz4  Tateishi   0-3
Mz6  Oazuma	 1-2
Mz7  Asakomiya  0-1-2
Mz8  Tateno	 1-2
Mz9  Hata	   1-2
Mz10 Otozai	 2-1

Day 6 bouts:

Mz2  Sawada (3-3)	 uwatenage	Mz1  Higashi (2-2)		Sawada qualified (#3)
Mz8  Tateno (2-2)	 tsukiotoshi  Mz4  Tateishi (0-4)
Mz9  Hata (2-2)	   uwatenage	Mz6  Oazuma (1-3)
Mz10 Otozai (3-1)	 okuridashi   Mz8  Tateno (2-3)		 extra bout for Tateno; Otozai qualified (#4)

I have no idea why Tateno was picked for the extra bout here, not Higashi. Maybe he was the only one still in the arena. (Nodding yes...) Sawada-Higashi was a repeat from Day 3. And again, two of the three 1-2 rikishi were from Shikoroyama-beya, so the 0-3 rikishi is put into the mix by necessity, and we also get yet another repeat bout because of it, Hata-Oazuma (previously on Day 4). Anyway, that's all the competition we're going to have, so the final results are this:

qualified:
#1  Mz3  Kanekuni   3-0   third win on Day 5, Bout 2
#2  Mz5  Tsukamoto  3-0   third win on Day 5, Bout 3
#3  Mz2  Sawada	 3-3   third win on Day 6, Bout 1
#4  Mz10 Otozai	 3-1   third win on Day 6, Bout 4

remaining order:
#5  Mz1  Higashi	2-2   second win on Day 5
#6  Mz8  Tateno	 2-2   second win on Day 6, Bout 2
#7  Mz9  Hata	   2-2   second win on Day 6, Bout 3
#8  Mz6  Oazuma	 1-3
#9  Mz4  Tateishi   0-4
#10 Mz7  Asakomiya  0-1-3

Edited by Asashosakari

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Excellent!

B-)

Makes me wonder if you have too much time on your hands though (I am not worthy...)

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Thank you Tsukinowa for this information. I plan on keeping Oazuma's records until he retires. I'm hoping for a long career for my second adoptee B-) .

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On a different topic, I think I'm able to say a few things about how the maezumo torikumi is made...

(I am not worthy...) I'd like to extend a golden sumo geek medal with laurel leaves to Asashosakari for his accomplishments in researching extremely obscure details.

Seriously... B-)

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(I am not worthy...) I'd like to extend a golden sumo geek medal with laurel leaves to Asashosakari for his accomplishments in researching extremely obscure details.

Seriously... B-)

(Sign of approval) (Sign of approval) (Sign of approval)

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