Sign in to follow this  
Dejimasama

Hurricane Katrina

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, still down here with no power. We hooked up a generator so I got on line early this morning while it is only 85 degrees in this room to say hi and let some people know i am ok. We had a few trees down, one hit our house but no serious damage occured from it. They are hopeing that maybe today we can get power back but it may take another 6 days. We have a generator and hooked up the freezer, refrig and fans to it so all is as well as it can be expected I guess, we got phone back sometime over night. No real food though, just non pershiable stuff cause all the pershiable stuff well perished. I am pretty much out of work since the company i do the books for in Slidell was washed away and may take months to get it rebuilt so I have to find a new one sometime soon I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi guys, still down here with no power.

Here's wishing you well and hoping you'll get your life back again real soon.. I'm sure all of us here are rooting for you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

send me an address by PM - an Aki banzuke is on the way - may raise even a small smile in a rough period.

ANR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping that none of our forum members were caught in the path of this storm. I'm glad to see Dejimasama and his family pulled through okay.

The level of destruction along the Gulf Coast is just incredible. They are calling this storm one of, if not the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States. An entire city has been rendered uninhabitable (Eighty percent of New Orleans is under water, with the flood levels still rising), most of the coastal towns in Mississippi and Alabama have been utterly destroyed. The whole thing just defies description. Just a sad, sad situation all around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear about your troubles Dejimasama I hope and pray that things will get better from now onwards,keep your spirits up and stay in touch. (Shaking head...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of us in Texas are taking in refugees from THE STORM. Please give to the charity of your choice if you can. Red Cross, Salvation Army, etc. The government has not yet kicked in to provide funds for food, etc. for helpers in Texas. (Rightly, all the money is going to Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi...) Mostly private, faith-based, and corporate donations are taking up the slack. Our little city of 18,000 will be housing around 400 folks until December. Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, and even El Paso are big time in on the relief effort: housing, feeding, caring, for tens of thousands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to here that you are ok. The college that I go to in Tn is taking students from New Orleans, and other places, and letting them come to school for free. There are a few other colleges in Tn that are doing this, so like Taizeniki my town is going to be growing some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok since this is still an active thread, i have a question.

please understand that this is not a troll message, intended to start a flamewar, but a genuine, honest to god question.

many of us, europeans, don't understand why Americans persist in building houses of light wood and construction panels (for want of a better word).

it looks as if a lot of the houses in florida etc are made of the same stuff that holiday bungalows are made of.

in Belgium, we use reinforced concrete and bricks.

the most severe weather i can remember is 100 mph wind speed, but apart from the occasional roof that went flying, most houses were unaffected.

why don't you use mortar, concreate and bricks like we do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
why don't you use mortar, concreate and bricks like we do?

I would say its all about the almighty dollar, reinforced houses came at reinforced prices.

Also there is one thing I have never understood is why shutters arent popular in the hurricanes states. In typhoon prone Japan many houses and business have rolladoor or sliding alumimium shutters to protect glasses doors and windows, they really are ubiquitous here in Japan, they cant be that expensive can they?

Plywood drilled to windows seems the protection of choice in the States.

Regardless I am glad to hear you and your family are safe Dejimasama, I hope things start to run more smoothly now that the federal govt has finally "gotten off their asses" as Mayor Ray Nagin implored them to do.

Did you evacuate or ride out the storm?

Ganbatte!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
why don't you use mortar, concreate and bricks like we do?

I am not a construction expert, but I would say that the main reason we use wood framing for our buildings is because we have a lot of it, and it allows more versatility and savings in contruction. If built with proper building codes, most homes will withstand 100+ mph winds. The vast majority of the damage from this storm is from storm surge and flooding; for the most part wind damage is due to flying debris rather than structural integrity problems. The buildings in New Orlean are still structurally sound, but they are under 20 feet of water.

... the federal govt has finally "gotten off their asses" as Mayor Ray Nagin implored them to do.

If New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin had "gotten off his ass", done the necessary planning for an effective evacuation plan, set up an emergency communications and control facility such as those found in most metropolitan areas, had an emergency recovery plan in effect, and spent more time providing information and guidance to incoming recovery units which were arriving in a vacuum and less time on TV complaining about the lack of assistance, a lot more of the 400,000 New Orleans natives would be alive today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May God keep yall safe!! I'm praying in Canada for all the people that's been affected by Katrina... GAMBATE!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys I am back and all is well here for me, been helping friends who lost much more than me. Thank you for all the well wishes.

As for the construction question we do use a great deal of brick, mortar and concrete in our construction around wood frames often on the coast. Most houses can withstand 100 mph winds but when you see the insane destruction is from the storm surge, tornadoes spawned by the storm and winds in the 100+ range sustained for many hours. Well the majority of the houses built in the past 15 years are built strong on the coast, the older ones are lacking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this