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AsaMoe

Asashoryu t-shirt

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I just bought an Asashoryu t-shirt and compared the kanji with those on a Banzuke. They looked completely different (but they are the same, no doubt).

I for myself have troubles reading my own handwriting and i use only 70 or 80 characters (small and big).

Then i notice, that there are only 3 Kanjis, while in the banzuke there are 5. Where does this difference come from ?

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Then i notice, that there are only 3 Kanjis, while in the banzuke there are 5. Where does this difference come from ?

I believe that the full shikona is listed on the banzuke. That would be Asashoryu Akinori.

BTW: does anyone know more about these second names of shikona?

They are not even listed on the NSK pages (I get them from Bandey's wonderful site). Who is giving out these names? On what basis?

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BTW: does anyone know more about these second names of shikona?

They are not even listed on the NSK pages (I get them from Bandey's wonderful site). Who is giving out these names? On what basis?

They're listed on the Japanese side. Compare this to this ("Asashoryu" only vs. 朝青龍 明徳).

FWIW, they're simply the "given name" part of each rikishi's shikona...for Japanese rikishi it is normally their original first name (as you've probably noticed on Bandey's site), while for foreign rikishi it's...well, picked by their oyakata I suppose, just like their "normal" shikona.

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They're listed on the Japanese side. Compare this to this ("Asashoryu" only vs. 朝青龍 明徳).

In case of Asashoryu, it's his high school name "MEITOKU Gijuku". He just reads it Akinori, more normal reading for the given name.

Most Japanese rikshis simply use their own however they may adapt the previous shikona holder's name as well - When Japanese select their kids name etc they will count the number of strokes and others to make sure the name go well with their "family" name as they believe your name can change your destiny.

It's the same way with rikishis too. If they are not going well or keep getting injuured they may change their shikona or just their given name to change their fortune.

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It's the same way with rikishis too.  If they are not going well or keep getting injured they may change their shikona or just their given name to change their fortune.

Isn't Kotonowaka a good example of this? He's had (if I recall correctly), the 'no' part of his shikona at various times in Kanji, Hiragana and Kitakana - all he needs is 'romaji' to collect the set (You are going off-topic...)

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I just bought an Asashoryu t-shirt and compared the kanji with those on a Banzuke. They looked completely different

This can also be attributed to the font being used. The banzuke kanji are written with a brush, and look quite different from a computer-generated graphic kanji which may be what's on your shirt. Or the kanji on your shirt may be even more stylized and difficult to read than the banzuke version. It could even be a signature, etc. . .

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It could even be a signature, etc. . .

It is more the signature.

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