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John Gunning

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You are joking right ?

i believe that it is my right to not like the fact that my country is totally connected to a religion .... (any religion)

i am not a cristian and i believe that having a religious symbol on my flag does not encourage "freedom or religious beliefs" that the constitution of my country so fondly advertises ...

anyway ... not the place to talk about all these.

please refrain from chracterisations of me in the future and i will just simply ignore your existence as well .... :-/

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Oh, great. Here's a secular person.

Changing your post after another person has already replied to it (check the time stamps of the edit and adere's reply) without mentioning it in any way is not a very nice thing to do. :-/

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I'm from the Republic of Texas, also known as the state of Texas or the "Lone Star" state. Only Hawaii and Texas have ever been their own nation/republic before joining the "union." And most Texans I know, including myself, still think of ourselves as Texan first, Americans second.

Today's Lone Star Flag was adopted on January 24, 1839 as the national flag of the Republic of Texas. It was first proposed in legislation introduced in the Third Congress of the Republic by William Wharton. The designer of the flag is unknown.

The flag was later adopted as the state flag when Texas became the 28th state in 1845. As with the flag of the United States, the blue stands for loyalty, the white represents purity, and the red is for bravery.

41-texas-flag.gif

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Mongolias Flag

The Mongolian flag: three equal, vertical bands of red (hoist side), blue, and red; centered on the hoist-side red band in yellow is the national emblem ("soyombo" - a columnar arrangement of abstract and geometric representation for fire, sun, moon, earth, water, and the yin-yang symbol)

post-539-1111752277_thumb.gif

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MFAJ05jx0.jpg

Very long full explanation about the meaning at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs site.

Summary:

Star of David: According to Sholem, the motive for the widespread use of the Star of David was a wish to imitate Christianity. During the Emancipation, Jews needed a symbol of Judaism parallel to the cross, the universal symbol of Christianity. In particular, they wanted something to adorn the walls of the modern Jewish house of worship that would be symbolic like the cross. This is why the Star of David became prominent in the nineteenth century and why it was later used on ritual objects and in synagogues and eventually reached Poland and Russia.

Stripes: The blue stripes on the Zionist flag were inspired by the stripes on the tallit (prayer shawl)... The blue stripes of the Zionist flag serve as a counterweight to the message of the Star of David. They give the flag the religious and ritual aspect totally absent from the latter.

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