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Jonosuke

Shortened Japanese Words

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College Amateur wrestler Nakanishi from Sendai University will be joining Ounomatsu beya in March. He will be starting  in Maezumo.

Japanese really have a penchant for shortening names and words and sometimes you really lose the original meaning.

For instance I was just watching NHK News and they were talking about their national soccer team playing against North Korea next week for the qualifying round for the next World Cup. After listing the names of players, the announcer asked who would be likely to be in "StaMen". In this case they shortened two words "Starting Members".

You can find all kinds of this while reading Japanese news. Like "DriCome" - this refers to a popular J-POP group called "Dream Come True". Another big hit in Japan last year was what's called "Matsu Ken Samba". This is sung and dance by Ken Matsudaira, a Samurai actor. He comes with a bunch of dancers wearing a samurai attire (with a mage and sword) and dance samba. It's actually kind of funny the first time you see it but grows tiresome after a dozen times. Again it's like the tap dance scene they do at the end of Zatoichi movie directed by Beat Takeshi. So "Matsu Ken" is Ken Matsudaira, not Matsu Prefecture or Matsu Dog.

Now back to the original news article Kintamayama refered to. The university in question is Senshu Daigaku (Senshu University), shortened to Sen-Dai like Nihon University is Nichi-Dai and University of Tokyo is "Tou-Dai". I do not believe there is a Sendai University though there is the University of Tohoku located in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, alma mater of my father. Incidentally Musoyama is also a graduate of Senshu University.

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the shortening og long words is natural in many cultures but the extent to which so much is shortened in Japanese leads me to agree with the nation's own linguists in believing the language will be a dead one come the year 2500 when seen alongside dwindling populatin numbers.

sekuhara

akiba

akeome

just 3 I remember hearing yeasterday alone.

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KimuTaku = Kimura Takuya (a 'singer' in the group SMAP and an actor)

BuriGuri = The Brilliant Green (A certain Japanese pop band with a female singer)

Amazumo = Amachua Sumo (Amateur sumo)

The list is as endless as people's desire to truncate their speech. These and the ones above are generally accepted contractions, although there are many that friends will use as slang amongst themselves. One I've heard is:

O-tsu (accompanied with the hand forming a circle and then the peace sign) = otsukaresama deshita, a phrase that literally means "You must be tired" and used as a parting greeting or a thank you of sorts after working with someone for the day.

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You can find all kinds of this while reading Japanese news.  Like "DriCome" - this refers to a popular J-POP group called "Dream Come True".  Another big hit in Japan last year was what's called "Matsu Ken Samba".  This is sung and dance by Ken Matsudaira, a Samurai actor.  He comes with a bunch of dancers wearing a samurai attire (with a mage and sword) and dance samba. It's actually kind of funny the first time you see it but grows tiresome after a dozen times.  Again it's like the tap dance scene they do at the end of Zatoichi movie directed by Beat Takeshi.  So "Matsu Ken" is Ken Matsudaira, not Matsu Prefecture or Matsu Dog.

Ever seen Katori Shigo's Katsuken Samba spoof on SMAP X SMAP?
sebu-ele (kansai)

sebu (kanto)

7-11

Not sure if it's just Kyushu, but here's it's just seben.

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