Sign in to follow this  
Kaikitsune Makoto

Kimarite Stats in 2004 with comments

Recommended Posts

Here are my kimarite stats for 2004. Will update the tables soon and add a

link there from this forum. In parenthesis are the differences compared to

2003. Due to expansion of makuuchi and kosho abolishment, there were 1845

bouts in makuuchi in 2004 and only 1685 in 2003 so 160 bouts more this

year which reflects a bit on most common techniques as naturally there are

more yorikiri by default but you do the analysis in your mind.

There were some techniques that were seen in 2003 but not in 2004:

chongake 1 (in 2003)

harimanage 1

okurihikiotoshi 1

hansoku 2

kakenage 6! Kakenage vanished...

Here are the kimarite stats for 2004:

Amiuchi 1 (+1)

Please accord and view with your own blue, brown, green or red eyes this

net casting by Mongolian inland man who in all probability has not touched

a fishing net numerous times during his spicy life on earth. Mongolian

yokozuna from Ulaan Bataar Asashoryu-zeki put a shame on fishermen's

children in makuuchi who have not enacted the traditional net casting this

year at all. Shame. The role of the net is acted by Tosanoumi-zeki, also

known as Mr Angel Ankles or in heavy situations warranting a meaner

expression, Mr Stumble Bum.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/haru2004/da...ashor_tosano.rm

hikkake 1 (-5)

There are certain phenomena in ozumo that are currently been examined at

various international, national (France and Egypt) and municipal

conferences aimed at defining new axioms to mankind. Aminishiki-zeki's

complete domination over Asasekiryu-zeki is one hot topic. Aminishiki-zeki

has a 5-0 record against Asasekiryu-zeki and while this can be contributed

to the crude statistical anomaly, the bout in Aki ("autumn" in Japanese,

common male name in Finland, the kanji for "Aki" has "fire"-kanji parts)

basho strongly strengthened the views of pro-axiomizing clique. Aminishiki

wrestled wounded on senshuraku with meniscal agony but even then he was

able to relax against Asasekiryu-zeki and yank his arm in such manner that

Asasekiryu-zeki lost the bout. This bout was the only one where hikkake

was seen in makuuchi in 2004 (year of Ukrainian tension). If you are so

inclined, please accord and see this with your eyes of choice:

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/aki2004/day15/asase_amini.rm

ipponzeoi 1 (+1)

Attempt to coax and lure You to watch this particular mano a mano

incident. Ipponzeoi is a luxury in ozumo. In most cases where ipponzeoi is

registered as the winning technique, the bout hardly resemblmes a classic

arm throw. However in this bout between Takekaze and Kinkaiyama the

execution of the kimarite is as close to true ipponzeio as it can be in

makuuchi sumo. In fact, it could be claimed that it is very rare to see

ipponzeoi done in world class judo either in sumo manner meaning the

thrower can't drop down to his/her knees and then then throw the foe with

ipponzeoi. Takekaze got a grip on Kinkaiyama's arm and started pivoting.

As he pivoted he notched a "step" forward every second or so reacting to

Kinkaiyama's body's movement. The series of motion is stepwise. It can be

seen extremely well in this video of the bout. Takekaze makes these

step-wise notches with the arm hold and gradually destroys what is left of

Kinkaiyama's balance. Remarkably neat ipponzeoi in makuuchi sumo and

Takekaze saw the window of opportunity and succeeded in the attempt

perfectly. Please accord and enter this to your Mozilla or other browser

(Mozilla is better).

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/natsu2004/d...ekaze_kinkai.rm

isamiashi 1 (+1)

kawazugake 1 (same)

Takekaze has hidden talents in fast reactions to try the unconventional

one. Please I ask you to watch this bout and put yourself in Shimotori's

left knee's medial collateral ligament's position and feel the empathy if

you are in the mood of empathy. Shimotori got his golden left arm where he

wanted it but Takekaze decided to fell the Frost Bird. He chose to proceed

with uchigake. However, life is life and therefore unexpected which lead

to peculiar event; Takekaze's uchigake was not causing Shimotori to fall

backwards but what happened was that at the very same moment when Takekaze

launched that uchigake wrap, Shimotori took a step forward and upon the

landing of Shimotori's left foot Takekaze's wrapping move reached its

target and exerted tremendous pressure on the medial collateral ligament

of Shimotori's left leg. Very lucky for Takekaze that Shimotori just

planted his foot to the exact location where Takekaze's wrap around move

exerted its full pressure. In the process of the tripping move, Takekaze's

leg wrapped around Shimotori's so completely that it was a kawazugake and

a beautiful one too. One of the technical highlights of the year. Please

accord and download/find from your hard drive:

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/nagoya2004/...imo_takekaze.rm This was

the second year in a row when one kawazugake was served on a gumbai plate.

koshinage 1 (same)

Hypnosis is used in selective cases to aid memory and dig up hidden or

suppressed memories. Perhaps one should hypnotize majority of sumoforum

members in order to help them to recollect the koshinage in 2003. In the

absence of hypnosis I suggest you study the bout on-line like a good

citizen. Wakanosato dumped Kaiho with a powerful koshinage in 2003. You

can see the bout here:

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/hatsu2003/d...iho_wakasato.rm

In 2004 one of the most stunning and baffling bout was Asasekiryu-Buyuzan

in Nagoya basho. Asasekiryu-Buyuzan is always full of fire and smoked

salmon but this one was one of a kind. When all pieces fall together,

people usually get married or make breakthroughs in science but on the

dohyo pieces falling together in harmony refers to this bout. Buyuzan had

it all but won but Sekiryu had gotten into one of those once in a lifetime

stances and just let the inevitable, yet so flabbergasting, koshinage be

born and so he did. Words don't tell. Video does. Please accord and

witness:

http://www.banzuke.com/~juryoika/200407/da...-Asasekiryu.asf

Pay attention to totally flabbergasted Buyuzan after the bout.

Flabbergasted. Baffled. Confused. Stick a fork. Ya ya ya.

kotehineri 1 (+1)

Kotehineri is extremely rare in the history of sumo including all

divisions. First kotehineri in makuuchi since who knows when. Not in

decades at least. Tochinonada committed this act of wildness against

Asasekiryu by being in trouble with mawashi glued Sekiryu and only having

kote-grip. He realised kotenage won't work so he suddenly changed the

direction and Sekiryu was caught off guard. Veru clear kotehineri which

gave justification for kotehineri's existence in the kimarite list.

Justified without this incident too though but this showed it in action

the first time. Please do take a look:

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/natsu2004/d...hinada_asase.rm

kubihineri 1 (+1)

Almost as rare as kotehineri and was seen only once in the last 20 years

in makuuchi. Just a sloppy bout between Shimotori and Kakizoe on the same

day at the aforementioned kotehineri.

okuritsuriotoshi 1 (+1)

Kotooshu's little tsuri against Futeno in Aki basho. Kotooshu is so tall

that he usually likes to lift his foe's balance upwards as it comes

naturally for such a big man without big belly to prevent close contact

and leverage for the lift. This time he got behind Futeno and just lifted

him up a bit and put him down off the dohyo.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/aki2004/day...eno_kotooshu.rm

okuritsuriotoshi 1 (+1)

Hakuho against Takekaze in Natsu. Nothing special about this.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/natsu2004/d...ekaze_hakuho.rm

sotokomata 1 (+1)

Kyokushuzan ended his 9 bout losing streak with the only sotokomata of the

year: http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/kyushu2004/...aze_kyokushu.rm

tsukihiza 1 (+1)

Tochiazuma's knee injury against Kyokutenho on day 3 in Aki basho.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/aki2004/day...ten_tochiazu.rm

tsukite 1 (+1)

Hayateumi can be slick at the tachi-ai but on day 1 in Hatsu he ran away

from Toyozakura after some 15 seconds of action. Toyozakura ran after him

but slipped on his own and touch the dohyo with his hand.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/hatsu2004/d...yateu_toyoza.rm

ushiromotare 1 (+1)

First time in makuuchi since its implementation in 2000. Picture does the

talking here:

TakamisakariUshiomotare.jpg

ashitori 2 (+2)

ashi (foot/leg) + toru (take etc.) => ashitori! Makes sometimes the victim

fly like a bird (tori), or more accurately flap their wings like tori.

Tori is market place in Finland. Market place for legs. The dream place

for ashitori expert! No ashitori specialists in makuuchi though. Mainoumi

was one. This year's ashitori were seen on consecutive days in Natsu basho

during the market for ashi on futsuka-me and mikka-me. Asashoryu and

Kotoryu. Asashoryu won his 33rd win in a row on that day.

kimetaoshi 2 (+2)

In post-Nami era collapsing kime is automatically rare and must have some

pain alleviating reasons for the losers to collapse. KaioU's arm clamp

generated too much pressure on Tamanoshima's weak elbow joints and

Tamanoshima dropped down in pain. He continued the following day though.

Tamanoshima has been suffering in KaioU's arm clamp three times during

their history. Must cause some worry to him by now and indeed Tamanoshima

commented after Kyushu bout that "once he started to squeeze my left arm I

got a bit scared". Kimetaoshi is rare and usually requires some height

difference to work unless the pain-factor causes the collapse.

http://www.banzuke.com/~movies/hatsu2004/d.../kaio_tamano.rm

sokubiotoshi 2 (+1)

tsuriotoshi 2 (+1)

Asashoryu vs Kotomitsuki often ends up with Shoryu having insanely deep

morozashi like in that Hatsu bout. In Natsu bout the ending is quite

similar. Morozashi was the key in both bouts and tsuriotoshi was the

winning kimarite. Good bouts. Don't hesitate to review these two

tsur

Edited by Kaikitsune Makoto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are certain phenomena in ozumo that are currently been examined at

various international, national (France and Egypt) and municipal

conferences aimed at defining new axioms to mankind.

In which of these conferences do you plan to present this great contribution to human knowledge? Tampereella vai? Would be nice to attend your multimedia presentation...

This yearly kimarite round-up is even better than usual this time, with all the direct links to illustrate the most remarkable instances. I think I'll need a month to digest this post. Fantastic! :-D (Nodding yes...)

Two things I've noticed (among many other fascinating facts):

- Since there have been more bouts than last year (due to the two more rikishi in makuuchi), there have been more kimarite used as well! So in some cases, a slight increase in the frequency of use can actually be a relative decline / stagnation...

- Hikiotoshi + hatakikomi were used exactly as much as last year, a slight decline if we take the above statement into account; that surprises me since I had again the impression we were beating new records there... It seems (I mean, that's an impression I tend to have) there's always too many anyway (although, when well-timed, they can be great as well).

A question: do you actually archive these kimarite stats somewhere, in addition to posts on the SML and here? Is there a place online where one can check the kimarite used by a rikishi in his whole makuuchi career for instance?

Edited by Azumaryu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is there a place online where one can check the kimarite used by a rikishi in his whole makuuchi career for instance?

http://www.szumo.hu/stat/index.html is an excellent resource for this.

Thank you Kaikitsune - I have been looking forward to this post! (Nodding yes...)

BTW, kotehineri is one of the newly added techniques, which explains why it hasn't been seen in decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a glass of vodka, this can lead you into that rarefied stratospheric ether of breathless territory. Just magnificent!

Much appreciated as I know putting something like this together takes hours of dedicated work - this is a giant kawazugake to sumokind.

Edited by Jonosuke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every year I look forward to this post/email. And every year, its excellent. (Sign of approval)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome post as always...like Kashunowaka, I've been looking forward to this since Kyushu basho ended. (Nodding yes...)

BTW, any significance to the fact that you went from least-used to most-used this year? Normally you list them the other way around, no? :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awesome post as always...like Kashunowaka, I've been looking forward to this since Kyushu basho ended.  (Nodding yes...)

No, I have been looking forward to this post since the last time Kaikitsune wrote his kimarite stats, so that's where you're wrong. :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BTW, any significance to the fact that you went from least-used to most-used this year? Normally you list them the other way around, no? (Nodding yes...)

Overdose of milk?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow sweet post bro! (maybe an understatement) thanks so much thats awesome! (another understatement). Im speechless.......(for once! lol) doesn't get much more thorough than that! "Yomasete itadaite doumo arigatou gozaimashita!" - Ryu

Edited by Ryukaze

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
n which of these conferences do you plan to present this great contribution to human knowledge? Tampereella vai? Would be nice to attend your multimedia presentation...

Haven't received a formal invitation to these conferences as of now but Christmas is coming and they say it is full of hope. Tampereella ei ole kovin usein sumokonferensseja, mutta teen asiasta kansalaisaloitteen!

A question: do you actually archive these kimarite stats somewhere, in addition to posts on the SML and here? Is there a place online where one can check the kimarite used by a rikishi in his whole makuuchi career for instance?

Actually I only post kimarite stats here on this forum. Excel-file where all the makuuchi bouts since Hatsu 1990 is very convenient and my main source for stats. Using Excel's filters one can easily display for example all bouts where KaioU beat Chiyotaikai with oshidashi or for example all bouts where Tosanoumi lost to anyone. So if I want to know how many times has Tosanoumi lost by hatakikomi, I just click the kimarite-column's drop down fliter and choose hatakikomi and it filters out all other bouts except the bouts where hatakikomi was the winning technique. Then I click Tosanoumi's name from the "Loser"-column's drop down menu and it filters out all hatakikomi bouts where Tosanoumi was not the loser. What remains is a table of bouts where Tosanoumi lost by hatakikomi. In this way one can get any information out of the table in seconds.

You can easily check how many different techniques any rikishi has used in his career by displaying all bouts since 1990 where the rikishi was winner and then click the drop down filter in the kimarite column and it shows all the filterable kimarite. Then just count in there. If I check it for Shuzan now, I'll get 44 different techniques used by him during his makuuchi career (42 actually +fusensho,hansoku). 33 for Asashoryu, 30 for KaioU, 20 for Akebono...

BTW, kotehineri is one of the newly added techniques, which explains why it hasn't been seen in decades.

Good point :-D

Sensible addition then!

BTW, any significance to the fact that you went from least-used to most-used this year? Normally you list them the other way around, no? smile.gif

Figured it could work better that way. Tried to make this more thorough this time as it is only once a year. Glad if those links to bouts are useful too! Two innovations this year. Reversed order and links to bouts :-)

Only once before it has taken more time to work on one post so it is nice to hear people enjoy these kind of kimarite nerdy posts! Doomo.

(Nodding yes...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kotehineri 1 (+1)

Kotehineri is extremely rare in the history of sumo including all

divisions. First kotehineri in makuuchi since who knows when. Not in

decades at least.

You are correct. The last kotehineri in Makuuchi was Aki 1956 with M14e Iwakaze winning against M20e Hirakagawa. Sorry, Kashunowaka, but the newest expansion seems to be more like a re-introduction of this kimarite (Nodding yes...). Since then there have been 4 kotehineri in lower divisons (including 2 on the same day in the same division) plus one more in Juryo, just now in Kyushu Aminishiki-Daishodai.

kubihineri 1 (+1)

Almost as rare as kotehineri and was seen only once in the last 20 years

in makuuchi.

8 times in lower divisions since Nagoya 2001. Only once in Makuuchi since 1953 with Tosanoumi winning against Takatoriki on day 6 Kyushu 1996.

okuritsuriotoshi 1 (+1)

Kotooshu's little tsuri against Futeno in Aki basho.

You meant okuritsuridashi here.

sotokomata 1 (+1)

Kyokushuzan ended his 9 bout losing streak with the only sotokomata of the

year.

A rare kimarite as well. Six times in Makuuchi from 1953 to 1969, then another 6 times from 1989 to now, three times Kyokushuzan.

2 uchimuso (+1)

Some kimarite consolation for Kotomitsuki for being the sole tsuriotoshi

victim in 2004 comes from him being the only rikishi who won with

uchimuso.

uchimuso certainly is one of those kimarite whose frequency is depending on the existence of executing rikishi. Since 1953 there have been 110 uchimuso in Makuuchi, so 2 happenstances a year seems to be normal. Kotomitsuki got five Makuuchi uchimuso now, but is nowhere leading in that kimarite as he is still behind Futagodake (15), Masuiyama (14), Asahikuni (9), Mainoumi (8), Kotonowaka (7) and Asahiyutaka (6). These 7 rikishi total 64 uchimuso, leaving 46 for the rest.

4 kubinage (+2)

Kubinage is seen 2-7 times in a year in makuuchi. Nobody specializes in

kubinage in sumo...

About five times a year since 1953, but with less specialization as with uchimuso. The uncrowned kubinage king is Futagoyama bully Akinoshima with 13 kubinage, followed by Kanenohana (11), Tamanoumi (10), Futagodake (8, yes, again), Narutoumi (8) and Takanoato (8). Currently active rikishi with most kubinage are Tochiazuma and Kyokushuzan with three each.

4 susoharai (+4)

Susoharai is usually seen 1-2 times per year so 4 times is good progress.

I like leg techniques. Do you?

I like legs. Susoharai was executed 44 times in 52 years, so even less than one per year. 4 times in 2004 is new Makuuchi record for a single year. Tochiakagi (5) and Narutoumi (4, again...) are the only two rikishi with more than 2 susoharai. Kotoryu and Kyokushuzan are the active rikishi with 2. Tokitenku is a leg man with bright future.

11 sotogake (-3)

9 uchigake (+6)

Uchigake is more spectacular than sotogake. Impact with dohyo is almost

exclusively hard because in uchigake the attacked truly falls on top of

the victim and this is technically challenging. 9 uchigake is superb

number. 1992 there were 6 uchigake in makuuchi but never this many.

1994 saw 7 uchigake. 1992 - 1994 was a short uchigake revival period. The uchigake seem to come in periods and we seem to witness another period now. Uchigake was common in the 70s until it suddenly dropped from kimarite-landscape in 80s. The early years were best though with 1953 seeing 34 uchigake. I will be able to report more about pre-1953 at another point of time when I have completed the Showa kimarite.

9 tsuridashi (same)

Tsuridashi has been seen 18 times in 2003 and 2004 together.

Tsuridashi was MUCH more common in earlier years. I guess this is a sign that the average weight of rikishi increased a lot over the decades like balloons. 1953 had 100 tsuridashi in Makuuchi, sinking a bit until begin of 60s (low point 68), then increasing to 128 in 1966 with the best year being 1971 with no less than 145 tsuridashi. Until 1980 a steady revenue of 50 to 100 tsuridashi, with uchigake-like dropping in 1981 (20). Still a steady rate of about 35 tsuridashi per year after that until final death-knell in 1993 (6 tsuridashi). 2001 was lowpoint in history with 2 tsuridashi.

While I'm at it, there are several formely-prevalent kimarite extinct today. Ever seen a yaguranage or yobimodoshi? No yaguranage, 2 yobimodoshi (Takanonami, Takanohana) in Heisei era, but 35 yaguranage from 1953 to 1975 (only 2 after 1965) and 22 yobimodoshi from 1953 to 1984 (only 1 after 1969, Chiyonofuji did it in 1984).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
While I'm at it, there are several formely-prevalent kimarite extinct today. Ever seen a yaguranage or yobimodoshi?

In my view both are such are power moves you need to have good strength as well as skills.

I thought when Asashoryu lifted up Kotomitsuki and tried to do Tsuri this year was almost "yobimodoshi" - I think perhpas "sashite" was not quite right for it.

To execute a Yaguranage, you need to have enourmous leg strength as basically you will be lifting your opponent with only one leg on the dohyo.

However more than anything else, I want to see more Uccharis and perhaps the demise of it is an indication that flexibility of rikishis is in decline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buyuzan had it all but won but Sekiryu had gotten into one of those once in a lifetime stances and just let the inevitable, yet so flabbergasting, koshinage be born and so he did. Words don't tell. Video does. Please accord and witness:

http://www.banzuke.com/~juryoika/200407/da...-Asasekiryu.asf

Pay attention to totally flabbergasted Buyuzan after the bout.

Flabbergasted. Baffled. Confused. Stick a fork. Ya ya ya.

Holy Toledo! Holy smokes! Or as Daffy Duck says: Sufferin' Succotash! Or as Snagglepuss says: Heavens to Murgatroid! (Do you have these characters in Finland?) And indeed, truly flabbergasting. (Punk rocker...)

I'm going to send this post to those friends of mine who wonder why one would want to (in one's words) "Watch fat men in diapers roll around together." Thank you so much for this summary. It beggars the imagination. (Hugging...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tosanoumi winning against Takatoriki on day 6 Kyushu 1996.

And this kubihineri was quite accidental too. Takatoriki sort of fell asleep and Tosanoumi gently guided his head onto invisible pillow.

Sotokomata:

A rare kimarite as well. Six times in Makuuchi from 1953 to 1969, then another 6 times from 1989 to now, three times Kyokushuzan.

There is a funny story concerning sotokomata. Shuzan beat Terao with sotokomata on day 4 in Hatsu 2000 and 3 days later Terao took his first ever win with sotokomata! He beat Hamanoshima with that. Old dog learned a new trick. Terao said the sotokomata by Shuzan was surprising. He certainly surprised Hamanoshima with that on day 7.

I like legs. Susoharai was executed 44 times in 52 years, so even less than one per year. 4 times in 2004 is new Makuuchi record for a single year. Tochiakagi (5) and Narutoumi (4, again...) are the only two rikishi with more than 2 susoharai. Kotoryu and Kyokushuzan are the active rikishi with 2. Tokitenku is a leg man with bright future.

For some reason susoharai appears to be a technique that annoys the loser greatly. On several occasions susoharai-victim has looked very disgusted with himself. Tokitenku surely breaks that possible record by Tochiakagi.

Tsuridashi was MUCH more common in earlier years. I guess this is a sign that the average weight of rikishi increased a lot over the decades like balloons. 1953 had 100 tsuridashi in Makuuchi, sinking a bit until begin of 60s (low point 68), then increasing to 128 in 1966 with the best year being 1971 with no less than 145 tsuridashi. Until 1980 a steady revenue of 50 to 100 tsuridashi, with uchigake-like dropping in 1981 (20). Still a steady rate of about 35 tsuridashi per year after that until final death-knell in 1993 (6 tsuridashi). 2001 was lowpoint in history with 2 tsuridashi.

It could also be a sign of changing styles in sumo. Tsuridashi was done a lot before also because many rikishi liked to lift their foes out instead of yorikiri even when the win would have been clear without the lift. More in the "dohyo culture" could be said. Morozashi grip and close to tawara situation gives quite "easy" conditions for tsuridashi but many rikishi never do it. For example Wakanosato surely could win much more with tsuridashi if he so wished. Perhaps tsuridashi isn't such a revered way to win anymore. Certainly the increased weight has significance but rikishi are also physically stronger now than before.

And while rikishi do it less now, the skill doesn't develop so well either which causes a neverending loop of weakening tsuri-desire and tsuri-skill. Shoryu is good at tsuri not only because he is strong but because he does it so much and tries it often. He is paying some small toll too with occasional back aches after those twisting tsuris.

I thought when Asashoryu lifted up Kotomitsuki and tried to do Tsuri this year was almost "yobimodoshi" - I think perhpas "sashite" was not quite right for it.

Yobimodoshi is almost impossible without a major missreading by the loser or big strength gap. The fact that there is no belt grip with the hand that executes the throw/slam requires a surprise element where rikishi resists too strongly towards a fake throw by the mawashi grip hand and then isn't fast enough to react to the slam to the other side. Shoryu had morozashi which is totally different situation. Yobimodoshi doesn't have tsuri aspect at all I think. Solely a ping pong move with perfect timing and power. Takanohana did this to Kenko but there definitely wasn't a massive strength gap between them. It looked rather effortless actually.

To complete the year 2004 fusensho list:

2 intais: Takanonami and Musoyama

Kasugao: tore toe ligaments and dislocated big toe in Nagoya basho

Dejima: Tore his calf muscle in Kyushu. Not the first time he gets calf injury like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this