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Iwagakki

English

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Iwagakki    0

I'm sure this has been said on this forum, dozens of times before, but...

I see a lot of you making apologies for your supposedly "poor english"

but at the same time, I am constantly astonished at how good your english really is.

Especially considering that it most likely is not a necessary part of your day to day life, and that you don't (probably) have much use for English, except on this forum.

I wish I cold speak French, or Swedish, or Ossetian, or Japanese, or sometimes, even English, as good as you all speak english.

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Full agreement here. I'm pretty fluent in Korean and don't suppose I'd be comfortable discussing some of these topics in that language. Kudos to those crossing the language barrier.

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Iwagakki    0

I have counted people from Ossetia, Hungary, France, UK, Japan, Germany, Finland, Sweden, Singapore, US, Canada, Russia, Bulgaria, Spain, Israel, on this forum. I think it's cool that we can all talk about sumo, (and argue). Thanks everyone. Maybe that is one of the best things about sumo for me.

How many countries did I miss? Many, I assume.

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Tokimori    0

One of the reasons why at least Swedes speak and write ok English is that we never dub movies and TV. You are constantly surrounded with English speaking moviestars and television. English is a normal thing in society which almost everyone knows.

That's at least my two

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Kishinoyama    277
I'm sure this has been said on this forum, dozens of times before, but...

I see a lot of you making apologies for your supposedly "poor english"

but at the same time, I am constantly astonished at how good your english really is.

Especially considering that it most likely is not a necessary part of your day to day life, and that you don't (probably) have much use for English, except on this forum.

I wish I cold speak French, or Swedish, or Ossetian, or Japanese, or sometimes, even English, as good as you all speak english.

As someone who never had any foreign language in school.... I applaud all of you! Your command of the language is better than my wife.... and she has been in the USA for more than 14 years.... (Whistling...)

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Zentoryu    142
As someone who never had any foreign language in school.... I applaud all of you! Your command of the language is better than my wife.... and she has been in the USA for more than 14 years.... (Whistling...)

Don't let her hear you say that... (In love...)

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Kishinoyama    277

As someone who never had any foreign language in school.... I applaud all of you! Your command of the language is better than my wife.... and she has been in the USA for more than 14 years.... (Whistling...)

Don't let her hear you say that... (Sigh...)

Hey I have told her many times... and we are still married..... (In love...)

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Guest MGLSekitori   
Guest MGLSekitori

For me at least learning English was easier than learning Russian.

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aderechelsea    106
Ossetia, Hungary, France, UK, Japan, Germany, Finland, Sweden, Singapore, US, Canada, Russia, Bulgaria, Spain, Israel

:-O

someone important you forgot ???

:-)

yep ... you got it .... Greece !

.

.

.

i agree with Tokimori-san that the non-dubed films help a lot.

No wonder Italians really suck in their English .Went there recently and couldn't believe they have never heard de Niro's voice in a movie for example !!!!!

:-P

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Dubbing is evil thing. Hopefully never comes here in any form. It is already more than annoying to listen to any interview where someone translates simultaneously so that the original voice fades to the background.

Everyone's English is very understandable here. Natives probably understand everything very easily if non-natives do too. I wonder how does it feel to be a native English speaker and observe hundreds and hundreds of posts by non-native speakers! Native English speakers have that chance often as opposed to native Finnish speakers who rarely see foreigner's written Finnish anywhere like this. Maybe that is why it is so very interesting every time such an opportunity to observe comes :-O

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Azumashida    1
Native English speakers have that chance often as opposed to native Finnish speakers who rarely see foreigner's written Finnish anywhere like this. Maybe that is why it is so very interesting every time such an opportunity to observe comes :-P

No joskus ulkomaalainen kirjoittaa suomeksikin t

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Onnagumo    1
Ossetia, Hungary, France, UK, Japan, Germany, Finland, Sweden, Singapore, US, Canada, Russia, Bulgaria, Spain, Israel

:-O

someone important you forgot ???

yep... you got it... THE NETHERLANDS!!!!!!

:-P :-) (Shaking head...)

Hardly any dubbing here either, except in movies for small children sometimes.

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Gernobono    188
:-O and Greece and the Netherlands, of course. How rude of me (Blushing...)

and AUSTRIA you surely wanted to add

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Manekineko    193

And Croatia... another country where films and TV-serials are not dubbed, thankfully!

But then, how do Germans and Austrians learn their English? (Blushing...)

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Jakusotsu    1,888
But then, how do Germans and Austrians learn their English? (Blushing...)

Good question. In the German speaking countries, ALL movies are dubbed ("synchronized", as we say) with no trace of English (or French, or...) left at all. They're doing a very good job at this as well, so one doesn't even miss the original. There are only very few regional cinemas (if any) that offer undubbed movies.

Now knows I finally why my English so b

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Azumashida    1
They're doing a very good job at this as well, so one doesn't even miss the original.

As far as I'm concerned, I can't stand watching movies dubbed in French, and I doubt it's because the French do a worse job at dubbing than the Germans. When you get used to seeing movies in their original language, it becomes absolutely unbearable to watch them dubbed.

In France, the situation is probably comparable to that in Germany, insofar as all movies are dubbed on the commercial channels and you need to watch a cultural channel named "Arte" or Cable TV (e.g. Canal +, etc.) to see movies in their original language. However, I would say that in most medium-sized cities (which to French standards means something like 200,000 inhabitants together with the suburbs), there is a so-called "art movie theatre" that shows movies in "V.O." (for Version Originale)...

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Faustonowaka    11

How about Belgium???

Movies here are never dubbed, only cartoons are.

I picked up English watching WWF on Eurosport!!

What a clothesline, that must have hurt!!

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Taka    21
How about Belgium???

Movies here are never dubbed, only cartoons are.

I picked up English watching WWF on Eurosport!!

What a clothesline, that must have hurt!!

;-)

I swear I did too!

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Higashimori    0
Native English speakers have that chance often as opposed to native Finnish speakers who rarely see foreigner's written Finnish anywhere like this.

en puhuu soumia. mina vahan huluu

ah, perkele

antekksi

sore shika dekinai (hah, that last one's Japanese ;-) )

Mom's from Alavus (nr. Seinajoki), never taught us a damn thing other than ikksi, kaksi, etc.

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Jakusotsu    1,888
As far as I'm concerned, I can't stand watching movies dubbed in French, and I doubt it's because the French do a worse job at dubbing than the Germans. When you get used to seeing movies in their original language, it becomes absolutely unbearable to watch them dubbed.

Quite on the contrary. The German speakers most of the time do an even better job than the original actors. (I've seen quite a few movies in both versions to evaluate this.) The only problem are some specific jokes that simply can't be translated, like Monty Python for instance.

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As far as I'm concerned, I can't stand watching movies dubbed in French, and I doubt it's because the French do a worse job at dubbing than the Germans. When you get used to seeing movies in their original language, it becomes absolutely unbearable to watch them dubbed.

Quite on the contrary. The German speakers most of the time do an even better job than the original actors. (I've seen quite a few movies in both versions to evaluate this.) The only problem are some specific jokes that simply can't be translated, like Monty Python for instance.

Don't imagine Basil Fawlty would go down too well either. (Applauding...) ;-)

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Jakusotsu    1,888
Don't imagine Basil Fawlty would go down too well either. (Applauding...)  ;-)

True. They tried, but failed horribly...(inevitably!)

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When I started English at school on 3rd grade elementary school, on the 4th or 5th lesson my life changed forever. Teacher showed a picture of a ball and asked me (Michael, we had English names naturally) what it is in English. I said BULL! to which the teacher said "That is a lot of BULL! Go outside!". I was never the same ever since.

Ok ok..maybe not but I did say BULL to which the teacher said with a kind smile that bull is h

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Jonosuke    20
Amanogawa is learning about Japanese a lot when I ask her about Japanese words in a way she has never thought about. "Gosh I have never thought about this!!!" she often says and then sees her own native language in a new light.

I am not sure if you ever asked Amanogawa san the whole story behind her shikona - it is a really beautiful and romantic story. It really does come true to heart to someone like myself born in the night of July 7 or early morning of July 8.

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