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Faustonowaka

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Well... when kosho was abolished and expansions of ranks announced, I got the impression that they would add 2 maku+2 juryo now (2004) then some more and some more until they reach the new final size for both divisions. It is possible I got it wrong. (In a state of confusion...)

I'm pretty sure they said "for the time being", meaning if and when the need arises, they will review this subject again.

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What's the highest number of Sanyaku ever recorded?

I think it's 15, reached in Aki and Kyushu 1961. If I'm not mistaken, it has never been higher than 12 again since the mid-1960s, though.

OK, there are 15 in Komusubi and above, but doesn't that make only 11 in sanyaku as there are 4 yokozuna (which shouldn't be counted in sanyaku). I'm not sure if the other reference to 12 in sanyaku was including Ys or not.

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OK, there are 15 in Komusubi and above, but doesn't that make only 11 in sanyaku as there are 4 yokozuna (which shouldn't be counted in sanyaku). I'm not sure if the other reference to 12 in sanyaku was including Ys or not.

You're strictly correct, but whenever I see somebody say "sanyaku" without any qualifier, he either means the whole thing from Komusubi to Yokozuna, or just Komusubi+Sekiwake. Using the term to refer to Komusubi/Sekiwake/Ozeki is really pretty unusual these days.

Perhaps Faustonowaka can clear up for us what he meant by 12 sanyaku. And, for that matter, perhaps Zeokage can clarify what specifically he was asking about. (Enjoying a beer...)

Edited by Asashosakari

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As stated in another thread, when I was posting that time I wasn't thinking too much about what I was writing. But now that I think about it I probably should have asked specifically for Komusubi/Sekiwake, but seeing the 1961 banzuke was interesting. Sumo history (even recent history) is not something I've managed to start looking at properly yet (shown by the fact that I didn't know for sure that Maru, Akebono, Waka and Taka were all yokozuna at the same time).

If there are 3 ways to interpret the term sanyaku, what are the records for all 3?

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If there are 3 ways to interpret the term sanyaku, what are the records for all 3?

AFAIK, the total 8 Komusubi and Sekiwake from those two banzukes I linked above are the record, although 8 lower sanyaku also happened in some other bashos around the same period of time, not just those two tournaments. Then, of course, there's Nagoya 1972 with 5 Sekiwake (only basho with that many, IIRC), but only 2 Komusubi, so the lower sanyaku total was still less than 8. There have never been more than 4 Komusubi, to my knowledge.

As for a total over Komusubi/Sekiwake/Ozeki, I'd have to check that; I don't really know at this time. I'll wait a bit, in case that's actually what Faustonowaka already looked into, so I don't duplicate his work. (No, no, no...)

Edit: Well, that was faster than expected...a quick re-check of those banzukes I linked actually shows that Aki 1961 had 13 "big sanyaku" rikishi (5 Ozeki, 4 Sekiwake, 4 Komusubi). Since there have never been more than 5 Ozeki at once (and never more than 8 Komusubi/Sekiwake as per above), I would assume that those 13 are the highest-ever count. It's possible that there are more basho than just that one with a count of 13, but since you didn't ask to list all such bashos, I'll leave it at that. :-/

Edited by Asashosakari

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