Kamitsuumi

Hidenoyama-beya

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Hidenoyama Oyakata (ex-Kotoshōgiku) announced his intention to start his own stable to his personal kōenkai. Heya construction is planned to finish by March next year.

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If my (quick) research is correct, it would be the first incarnation of a Hidenoyama stable since 1914.

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The groundbreaking ceremony for Hidenoyama-beya took place on October 26th, in Higashimukojima, Sumida, Tokyo. Construction of the five-storey building begins next week and is scheduled to be completed in August. 148 sq.m floor plan, which puts it roughly in between Nishiiwa and Ajigawa if I recall correctly.

Uchideshi Kotohanashiro and Kotomunakata were present with the shisho, okamisan and (I think?) their son.

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Every time I read Hidenoyama, the image of Hiyonoyama the Kyokai mascot character pops up on my head. I guess there's a passing resemblance... 

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1 hour ago, dingo said:

Every time I read Hidenoyama, ...

...I think of a certain six-basho suspension.

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I think of a certain naughty wrestler and his tsukebito in a gambling parlour. 

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Hidenoyama had a talk event on March 3rd as special guest of the 40th public tooth health research seminar Neko-no-kai (cat meet) https://www.quint-j.co.jp/web/topic/topi.php?id=3645

He first talked about his sumo life, plans for the new heya and then answered prepared questions:

- about new recruits, with height/weight limitations gone: body size is unimportant now, anybody who likes sumo can join (he didn't mention Motomura)

- about how to eat chanko at a heya? - become a member of the Hidenoyama-beya koenkai, not there yet, but in autumn

- sumo is bad for the teeth? - tsuppari, harite may break the jaw

He wants to bring his deshi to the experience of yokozuna, which he himself didn't have - scouting focuses on having his deshi dream of becoming yokozuna

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On 16/04/2024 at 04:27, Akinomaki said:

scouting focuses on having his deshi dream of becoming yokozuna

OK, this reminds me of something I've wondered.  In English, the same word - "dream" - is used for unconscious hallucinations as well as for personal aspirations.  I don't know about other people, but the things that I dream about at night are effectively never things that I would categorize as personal aspirations.  I accept the fact that at least in English the same word is used for both, but is this the case for other languages?  While I see the potential connection between these things, unless I just have much weirder dreams than most people, I can't see how in general the two concepts should automatically use the same word.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I accept the fact that at least in English the same word is used for both, but is this the case for other languages?

It is, for Portuguese at least. Can't guarantee it for any other language though, but I'm pretty sure Spanish and Italian follow suit.

Edited by Koorifuu
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1 hour ago, Koorifuu said:

It is, for Portuguese at least. Can't guarantee it for any other language though, but I'm pretty sure Spanish and Italian follow suit.

The same in Spanish, at least

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8 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I accept the fact that at least in English the same word is used for both, but is this the case for other languages?

In Russian "сон" is "dream" in the sleep sense but "мечта" is "dream" in the "personal aspiration" or "fantasy" sense.

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9 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I accept the fact that at least in English the same word is used for both, but is this the case for other languages?  

In case it wasn't obvious, this is the case in Japanese. 

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12 hours ago, Gurowake said:

  I accept the fact that at least in English the same word is used for both, but is this the case for other languages?  

In French too, "rêve", but often with a connotation of unrealisable wishes.

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16 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I don't know about other people, but the things that I dream about at night are effectively never things that I would categorize as personal aspirations. 

I did used to dream about catching big carp, sometimes specific fish, and I have it on good authority that I talked about it in my sleep, too.
Mind you, catching big carp was more of an obsession than personal aspiration...

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In German it's the same, too: "träumen" (verb) or "Traum" (noun).

There's a proverb as well: "Träume sind Schäume" whose meaning is similar to "dreams are ten a penny" (at least that's what google turned up).
Schäume is plural of Schaum which translates to foam or bubbles and rhymes with Träume.

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21 hours ago, Reonito said:

In Russian "сон" is "dream" in the sleep sense but "мечта" is "dream" in the "personal aspiration" or "fantasy" sense.

I can confirm it. 

"Сон" is also used for the actual act of sleeping ("здоровый сон" = "healthy sleep").

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