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Kintamayama

Joukouryuu retires

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Ex-Komusubi and current Makushita veteran Joukouryuu has retired. He holds the record for most consecutive wins since entering sumo - 27 straight wins.

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I suppose the latest 1-6 made it obvious he was never easily getting back to sekitori. A massive waste of a career due to injuries so soon after his meteoric rise.

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A tough road.  He was back in Juryo last year, and bounced back to Ms1 in Kyushu, but the slide has been evident.  Good luck to him. 

Has he even asked around about a kabu?

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No word on one in the official announcement, so I guess not. (He's technically eligible since he's an ex-komusubi.)

Also, with 10 sekitori in the queue for only 5 kabu, I wouldn't be surprised that he doesn't get one (that ratio is before taking into account sanyo for everyone). Other than the speed record and making it to komusubi, his career hasn't actually been all that impressive thanks to injury.

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Reports are that he is leaving the Sumo Association. 

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When I saw his first 4 bouts I had the gut feeling that this might be his last tournament on the dohyo. 

As others have mentioned already, big start and rather mediocre injury plugged sekitori career. 

Due to the current kabu draught, he will probably be one of quite a few eligible Kise beya veterans that have to leave the NSK sooner or later. Tokushinho preceded Jokoryu. Akiseyama as a mostly Juryo veteran is very likely not in line for a share and Hidenoumi more or less belongs in the same category. 

At least Tokushoryu with a yusho and over 60 sekitori basho under his belt should have a decent chance IMO.

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Throwback to that time he got his kinboshi on his freshly injured knee.

 

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The remote intai press conference was today: "About my sumo life - I did all I could, there is no feeling of regret" o

not a happy face like recently Kaisei and Shohozan

20220924-OHT1I51187-L.jpg

Edited by Akinomaki
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36 minutes ago, Akinomaki said:

The remote intai press conference was today: "About my sumo life - I did all I could, there is no feeling of regret" o

not a happy face like recently Kaisei and Shohozan

20220924-OHT1I51187-L.jpg

Guy on the right looks intensely bored…

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I got back into sumo just as his career was peaking, he was the first rikishi I got excited about. Sad to see him go out like this but he's done his best with what he had and he should be proud.

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On 24/09/2022 at 06:28, Seiyashi said:

Disappointed, I would say.

Interesting that Kise has produced over a dozen sekitori since he founded the heya but none have got past komusubi. Maybe Jokoryu could have been the one if he'd stayed injury-free. 

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8 hours ago, ryafuji said:

Interesting that Kise has produced over a dozen sekitori since he founded the heya but none have got past komusubi. Maybe Jokoryu could have been the one if he'd stayed injury-free. 

That IS interesting. Ah well, along comes Kinbozan. 

Jokoryu's drop from sekitori JUST preceded my fandom, so I can't comment on his prior ability, but certainly he always seemed to give it everything he had. This sport (like all sports, I suppose) can be brutal with how injuries can so sharply changed the trajectory of a career. Hope he enjoys post-sumo life.

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On 27/09/2022 at 06:13, ryafuji said:

Interesting that Kise has produced over a dozen sekitori since he founded the heya but none have got past komusubi.

They're basically a heya of college rikishi, so that's not overly surprising.

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On 29/09/2022 at 00:30, yohcun said:

They're basically a heya of college rikishi, so that's not overly surprising.

The shisho is also a collegiate wrestler, I believe he holds the most consecutive basho at hiramaku without making sanyaku and falling to Juryo

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1 hour ago, WAKATAKE said:

The shisho is also a collegiate wrestler, I believe he holds the most consecutive basho at hiramaku without making sanyaku and falling to Juryo

Collegiate wrestlers can also make it further, iirc Mitakeumi is an example. At least the jump from komusubi to sekiwake shouldn't be that hard for a good rikishi. Jokoryu could've made it if not for the injury... 

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As much as it pains me to say, as someone who's been a fan since his time as Sakumayama... his komusubi basho was very fortuitous. He got there via overpromotion as there were no better candidates in a time y/o did their job, and promptly did a 4-11.

That being said, had he stayed injury-free, he definitely would've made sanyaku regularly, but it was very clear early on he never really recovered from them and just kept wrecking his body further.

Here's Jokoryu chongake-ing a pre-injury Terunofuji.

 

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1 hour ago, Koorifuu said:

his komusubi basho was very fortuitous. He got there via overpromotion as there were no better candidates in a time y/o did their job, and promptly did a 4-11.

It would be very fortuitous by today's standards, but was something of a regular occurrence back then, for the reason you mention.  It was difficult for anyone in the joi other than the Y/O (counting Goeido as an Ozeki here since he was just promoted after that tournament) to get a KK due to all the wins they stacked up, so it was regularly whoever had the best record in the mid-maegashira that got the nod.   Jokoryu wasn't even the luckier of the Komusubi; Chiyotairyu had the same record in the slot just below him and was also promoted.

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11 hours ago, Gurowake said:

It would be very fortuitous by today's standards, but was something of a regular occurrence back then, for the reason you mention.  It was difficult for anyone in the joi other than the Y/O (counting Goeido as an Ozeki here since he was just promoted after that tournament) to get a KK due to all the wins they stacked up, so it was regularly whoever had the best record in the mid-maegashira that got the nod.   Jokoryu wasn't even the luckier of the Komusubi; Chiyotairyu had the same record in the slot just below him and was also promoted.

Haha, while Chiyotairyu was indeed even luckier, this makes it pretty clear!

The 14 M7 to score 10 wins before him didn't make it. Same with the 6 occasions after him.

All in all, since 2000, 21 guys scored 10 wins from M7. He was the only one to get a sanyaku slot out of it.

And while yeah, the combined consistency & power of the Y/O ranks meant joi / lower sanyaku were almost always getting double digit losses and that lots of people made komusubi/sekiwake (for a wholly different reason than today) - it still wasn't common to overpromote THIS much. Goeido's promotion played a role, as you mentioned, too - pushing everyone else one up.

Edited by Koorifuu
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4 hours ago, Koorifuu said:

Haha, while Chiyotairyu was indeed even luckier, this makes it pretty clear!

...and this makes clear even prettier.

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4 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

...and this makes clear even prettier.

And 7 of those 9 other guys ended up with a kabu.  Of course, 1 topped out at Ozeki and 5 at Sekiwake, so there's that.

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