Yamanashi

Kakuryu on Twitter, FB

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Is that really "his" Twitter/FB or just the accounts set up to publicise his danpatsu?

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Posted (edited)

There's a telephone number listed on the Facebook account.  +81 3-6240-2002.  I don't speak enough Mongolian or Japanese to call.  I wonder who would answer!  Actually, I think this telephone number is a tip-off that the account was set up outside of Japan.  The way the number is listed is the way someone from outside of Japan would dial it.  If it was dialed from inside Japan, it would be dialed ---- 03-6240-2002.  https://www.facebook.com/kakuryu71/

You'll also notice at the top next to Kakuryu71, it says "Event Planner".  I seriously doubt that that's his new post-Yokozuna job!

 

Edited by sumojoann
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1 hour ago, Seiyashi said:

Is that really "his" Twitter/FB or just the accounts set up to publicise his danpatsu?

It is not "his" Twitter/FB but that of the intai zumo event executive office. That is in fact he - and helpers, because all is organized by the oyakata who has the event. If he will continue to use it after the event remains to be seen.

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On 29/06/2022 at 08:50, sumojoann said:

There's a telephone number listed on the Facebook account.  +81 3-6240-2002.  I don't speak enough Mongolian or Japanese to call.  I wonder who would answer!  Actually, I think this telephone number is a tip-off that the account was set up outside of Japan.  The way the number is listed is the way someone from outside of Japan would dial it.  If it was dialed from inside Japan, it would be dialed ---- 03-6240-2002.  https://www.facebook.com/kakuryu71/

You'll also notice at the top next to Kakuryu71, it says "Event Planner".  I seriously doubt that that's his new post-Yokozuna job!

 

Oooh I'm looking for an event planner for my wedding, I wonder if Kakuryu would be willing and available?!

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On 29/06/2022 at 09:50, sumojoann said:

There's a telephone number listed on the Facebook account.  +81 3-6240-2002.  I don't speak enough Mongolian or Japanese to call.  I wonder who would answer!  Actually, I think this telephone number is a tip-off that the account was set up outside of Japan.  The way the number is listed is the way someone from outside of Japan would dial it.  If it was dialed from inside Japan, it would be dialed ---- 03-6240-2002.  https://www.facebook.com/kakuryu71/

You'll also notice at the top next to Kakuryu71, it says "Event Planner".  I seriously doubt that that's his new post-Yokozuna job!

 

In Germany it's absolutely normal to have +49/0049 in your signature/on your card. Especially if there is a chance for international contacts. So, to post your country prefix is no unusual sight in the interwebs, just courtesy.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Benihana said:

In Germany it's absolutely normal to have +49/0049 in your signature/on your card. Especially if there is a chance for international contacts. So, to post your country prefix is no unusual sight in the interwebs, just courtesy.

Yes, I agree that adding your country access code (prefix) is not unusual.  However, when you are inside Japan, I believe you always dial a zero before the telephone number, at least in the larger cities.  When you call from outside Japan, you drop the zero before the telephone number.  In this case, I'm referring to the zero in front of the 3.  The telephone number as shown on Facebook has dropped the zero (before the 3), leading me to conclude that either whoever set up this Facebook page is expecting to receive calls from outside Japan or not expecting to receive calls from within Japan.  OR, a mistake was made & the zero was accidentally left off the Facebook page.  (I'm a retired AT&T employee with 27 years of service.  Please excuse my focus on such details!). 

In any case, the key tip-off that the Facebook account was NOT set up by Kakuryu himself is "event planner" listed next to his name at the top.  Like you, Stupidface, I would like to hire him for my next "event!" lol  But yours would be higher priority than mine!

Edited by sumojoann
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Dropping the initial zero when dialing internationally is common around the world. It's not a Japan specific thing.

Likewise Facebook seems to display the number correctly based on your location. For us inside Japan it shows 03-6240-2002

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Also zero is not 'before' the number but part of the number. 

In many countries virtually all telephone numbers begin with zero. 

It's the case as far as we know in Japan, the UK, Ireland, Australia, Belgium, Turkey, and Argentina to name a few.

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"Event Planner" is just the most appropriate of Facebook's preset page designations - one of which you have to chose when setting up a page. 

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3 hours ago, Inside Sport Japan said:

"Event Planner" is just the most appropriate of Facebook's preset page designations - one of which you have to chose when setting up a page. 

I would hardly say that "Event Planner" is the "most appropriate" for Yokozuna Kakuryu!

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3 hours ago, Inside Sport Japan said:

Dropping the initial zero when dialing internationally is common around the world. It's not a Japan specific thing.

Likewise Facebook seems to display the number correctly based on your location. For us inside Japan it shows 03-6240-2002

That's correct that the initial zero is commonly dropped when dialing internationally.  We were discussing Japan in this thread, not the rest of the world.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Inside Sport Japan said:

 

 

4 hours ago, Inside Sport Japan said:

Also zero is not 'before' the number but part of the number. 

In many countries virtually all telephone numbers begin with zero. 

It's the case as far as we know in Japan, the UK, Ireland, Australia, Belgium, Turkey, and Argentina to name a few.

I purposely chose to use the word "before" to distinguish which zero I was referring to since there are 3 other zeros in the telephone number.  I made the decision that it would be easier to understand for some people.

And once again, my focus was on Japan, not "many countries", since Japan was the subject of the discussion along with Kakuryu.

If anyone wishes to discuss telephone systems of the world, may I suggest starting a new thread?

Edited by sumojoann

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10 minutes ago, sumojoann said:

 

I purposely chose to use the word "before" to distinguish which zero I was referring to since there are 3 other zeros in the telephone number.  I made the decision that it would be easier to understand for some people.

And once again, my focus was on Japan, not "many countries", since Japan was the subject of the discussion along with Kakuryu.

If anyone wishes to discuss telephone systems of the world, may I suggest starting a new thread?

As the OP, I'd just like to interject that the debate on international long distance telephone number etiquette is FAR more fascinating than my interest in noting Kakuryu's opening of a FB page and Twitter feed.(Beinghypocrite...)

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A new thread is probably a good idea in any case, because if this one keeps going the way it has any longer, it risks becoming the dumbest thread ever contributed to this forum, and that would be a shame for Kakuryu's danpatsu efforts.

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Posted (edited)

Well, let me contribute to the rerailing: any idea how much an ordinary ticket to a danpatsu costs on average and how often in advance they get sold out? We might have a reason to call that number if Japan condescends to state with some certainty whether they are reopening to foreign tourists, but fat lot of good it'll do us if the tickets sell like hot cakes.

Edited by Seiyashi

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1 hour ago, Seiyashi said:

Well, let me contribute to the rerailing: any idea how much an ordinary ticket to a danpatsu costs on average and how often in advance they get sold out? We might have a reason to call that number if Japan condescends to state with some certainty whether they are reopening to foreign tourists, but fat lot of good it'll do us if the tickets sell like hot cakes.

The tickets are usually a tiny bit cheaper than the tickets for the basho - e.g. for Kotoshogiku https://hidenoyama.jp/#ticket-info

Very popular rikishi like Kisenosato had the tickets sold out in no-time, the others have to really gambarize to get all tickets sold.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, sumojoann said:

I would hardly say that "Event Planner" is the "most appropriate" for Yokozuna Kakuryu!

The page is 'Kakuryu Retirement Ceremony Executive Office" - a temporary organization literally set up to plan an event.

None of Facebooks other preset designations fit it better.

Edited by Inside Sport Japan

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

Well, let me contribute to the rerailing: any idea how much an ordinary ticket to a danpatsu costs on average and how often in advance they get sold out? We might have a reason to call that number if Japan condescends to state with some certainty whether they are reopening to foreign tourists, but fat lot of good it'll do us if the tickets sell like hot cakes.

As a Yokozuna I think Kakuryu is obviously in a very special category and shouldn't have too many issues shifting tickets, but one thing that actually shocked me when I had a chat with buysumotickets for a Tachiai post a couple years ago (sorry if linking this rubs OG forum folks up the wrong way for some reason), was that many foreigners actually see these events as their sumo experience when they visit Japan rather than a basho. This ends up being very beneficial to guys who may not be able to sell out the Kokugikan outright through traditional marketing and who we see hustling their danpatsushiki during honbasho or other online marketing avenues. I would have thought for sure that the average foreign fan at this type of event was more, rather than less, of an avid follower of the sport.

So I would be curious to what extent the resellers or third party brokers are able to secure tickets for Kakuryu's event, given that he's not the level of popularity of a Kisenosato where there was just absolutely no availability, but also not exactly some long serving Juryo guy who needs to sell any ticket by any means. 

Edited by themistyseas
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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, themistyseas said:

was that many foreigners actually see these events as their sumo experience when they visit Japan rather than a basho.

This is a very massive surprise to me, for the same reasons as you've stated. Different strokes for different folks, but don't they know anything about the context and relative rarity of a danpatsu when they visit or do they just file it into the mental category of "obligatory local culture thing"?

That said, a lot of the ancillary events around a danpatsu, that wouldn't be out of place at a jungyō, I can see being more interesting than just a whole regular basho day. Things like tsuna-tying, oichomage making, etcetc.

Edited by Seiyashi
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5 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

This is a very massive surprise to me, for the same reasons as you've stated. Different strokes for different folks, but don't they know anything about the context and relative rarity of a danpatsu when they visit or do they just file it into the mental category of "obligatory local culture thing"?

That said, a lot of the ancillary events around a danpatsu, that wouldn't be out of place at a jungyō, I can see being more interesting than just a whole regular basho day. Things like tsuna-tying, oichomage making, etcetc.

I'll almost definitely never get to Japan, but a trip to a basho would be #1 on my list.  However, the schedule is dicey: 90 days a year, spaced out with more than a month in between.  If you aren't planning your trip specifically for Ozumo, you might not get a chance to see any action.  As you say, the danpatsu-shiki experience has many things a regular basho doesn't have (though I'm not sure how many newbies would know or care), and they extend the number of days when the Kokugikan is in use.  If I had the chance to see one, I'd jump on it.

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I mean yes, ozumo is only on about a quarter of the year, but surely a danpatsu is just a much rarer event. Only when the two are classed together as just generically sumo does the part about increasing your chances of seeing sumo make sense. That said, it does suggest that to the "casual buyers" of danpatsu tickets they don't see the distinction or in a sense appreciate the full import of it, at least not at first.

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14 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

I'll almost definitely never get to Japan, but a trip to a basho would be #1 on my list.  However, the schedule is dicey: 90 days a year, spaced out with more than a month in between.  If you aren't planning your trip specifically for Ozumo, you might not get a chance to see any action.  As you say, the danpatsu-shiki experience has many things a regular basho doesn't have (though I'm not sure how many newbies would know or care), and they extend the number of days when the Kokugikan is in use.  If I had the chance to see one, I'd jump on it.

It never hurts to dream big.  Plan your trip with a basho in mind.  May and Sept are usually great times to be in Tokyo.  Plan months ahead to secure a room in a budget hotel (there's one a 3-min walk from the Kokugikan).  Very small but clean.  Eat around the corner -- lots of inexpensive little places.  Pre-order your basho tickets from Jeff at buysumotickets.com.  He's honest & reliable.  Plane tickets have really gone up, unfortunately.  That's what credit cards are for.  Dream big.  Make it happen.  PM me if you would like further information.

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, sumojoann said:
22 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

I'll almost definitely never get to Japan, but a trip to a basho would be #1 on my list.  However, the schedule is dicey: 90 days a year, spaced out with more than a month in between.  If you aren't planning your trip specifically for Ozumo, you might not get a chance to see any action.  As you say, the danpatsu-shiki experience has many things a regular basho doesn't have (though I'm not sure how many newbies would know or care), and they extend the number of days when the Kokugikan is in use.  If I had the chance to see one, I'd jump on it.

It never hurts to dream big.  Plan your trip with a basho in mind.  May and Sept are usually great times to be in Tokyo.  Plan months ahead to secure a room in a budget hotel (there's one a 3-min walk from the Kokugikan).  Very small but clean.  Eat around the corner -- lots of inexpensive little places.  Pre-order your basho tickets from Jeff at buysumotickets.com.  He's honest & reliable.  Plane tickets have really gone up, unfortunately.  That's what credit cards are for.  Dream big.  Make it happen.  PM me if you would like further information.

While this is great advice, simply for the sake of providing perspective from winging it - it's still technically possible to see a basho without pre-booking tickets. That being said, it was far from my first trip to Japan, so I had the advantage of roughly knowing how to get around and the basho wasn't the only variable; I was certainly overly prepared on my first trip there, and I would definitely advise a lot more planning for a dream holiday.

Pre-pandemic, I had had a couple weeks between jobs in July so I flew to Japan on pretty much a whim, I think helped by the fact that my country's flag carrier was offering a promotion on tickets to Tōkyō. Winged it to Nagoya and left myself three days in there, with the idea that I would go see a basho on one of those days. I just barely missed the end of the line when I woke up at 5 and walked for half an hour to the Dolphins Arena, so I switched my itinerary around and took a few day trips around Nagoya and to Ise. Overslept the second morning, but finally made it on the third morning when I woke up at 4:30am and hotfooted it there; made it about 10-20 people before the end of the line and got a ticket in the nosebleed section. (If you intend to wing it thus, bring binoculars.)

This may or may not be applicable any longer as I seem to recall same-day ticket sales were not happening for some of the recent basho. And speaking of which, I wonder how buysumotickets is doing, since there hasn't been foreign tourism for quite a while. Do they also happen to provide tickets for danpatsu shiki, or is that too niche a sideline to bother with?

The good news about Japan is that accommodation is almost always kept to a high standard, so you needn't worry too much about risking getting dodgy rooms for a low price same as you might in other countries. There is a whole industry of no-frills "business hotels" specifically near train stations for short-term commercial travellers, but they're great options for tourists on a budget too. If you are a single traveller that isn't too large in size and don't mind dormitory-style living with common toilets, capsule hotels can be a decent novelty as well that is friendly to your wallet.

Train stations are always an excellent place to find food - not the ekiben, which can be a bit pricey for the packaging, but the small hole-in-the-wall type shops on the platforms and also immediately around the station. And of course if you pass by a Matsuya or Yoshinoya that's a good option for a filling don. That said, finding food that's a step up in standard without a disproportionate rise in price can be a bit tricky without some local intelligence - I have a friend who spent time on exchange there and had a list of great eats, but a lot of them were not exactly on the usual tourist beaten tracks.

Edited by Seiyashi
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

While this is great advice, simply for the sake of providing perspective from winging it - it's still technically possible to see a basho without pre-booking tickets. That being said, it was far from my first trip to Japan, so I had the advantage of roughly knowing how to get around and the basho wasn't the only variable; I was certainly overly prepared on my first trip there, and I would definitely advise a lot more planning for a dream holiday.

Pre-pandemic, I had had a couple weeks between jobs in July so I flew to Japan on pretty much a whim, I think helped by the fact that my country's flag carrier was offering a promotion on tickets to Tōkyō. Winged it to Nagoya and left myself three days in there, with the idea that I would go see a basho on one of those days. I just barely missed the end of the line when I woke up at 5 and walked for half an hour to the Dolphins Arena, so I switched my itinerary around and took a few day trips around Nagoya and to Ise. Overslept the second morning, but finally made it on the third morning when I woke up at 4:30am and hotfooted it there; made it about 10-20 people before the end of the line and got a ticket in the nosebleed section. (If you intend to wing it thus, bring binoculars.)

This may or may not be applicable any longer as I seem to recall same-day ticket sales were not happening for some of the recent basho. And speaking of which, I wonder how buysumotickets is doing, since there hasn't been foreign tourism for quite a while. Do they also happen to provide tickets for danpatsu shiki, or is that too niche a sideline to bother with?

The good news about Japan is that accommodation is almost always kept to a high standard, so you needn't worry too much about risking getting dodgy rooms for a low price same as you might in other countries. There is a whole industry of no-frills "business hotels" specifically near train stations for short-term commercial travellers, but they're great options for tourists on a budget too. If you are a single traveller that isn't too large in size and don't mind dormitory-style living with common toilets, capsule hotels can be a decent novelty as well that is friendly to your wallet.

Train stations are always an excellent place to find food - not the ekiben, which can be a bit pricey for the packaging, but the small hole-in-the-wall type shops on the platforms and also immediately around the station. And of course if you pass by a Matsuya or Yoshinoya that's a good option for a filling don. That said, finding food that's a step up in standard without a disproportionate rise in price can be a bit tricky without some local intelligence - I have a friend who spent time on exchange there and had a list of great eats, but a lot of them were not exactly on the usual tourist beaten tracks.

I agree with you that you can wing it but only if, like you said, you've been to Japan before and are familiar with getting around and have a flexible schedule.  But for someone like Yamanashi who has never been to Japan before, a lot of pre-planning is essential, as you mentioned, in order to have a dream holiday.  Even booking a hotel requires pre-planning, especially if you want to stay in a budget hotel close to the Kokugikan during a basho.  I can certainly understand that you like to wing it and can generally be successful at it.  I must admit that I'm the pre-planning type as is my husband, even though we've been to Japan several times.  We don't want to risk missing out and then being disappointed.  Before the pandemic, there were occasions when an entire Toyoko Inn (business hotel) was booked by a Chinese travel agency so no rooms were available even 6 months ahead of time!

Regarding buysumotickets.com, even before the pandemic, Jeff began offering to help customers obtain tickets to baseball & soccer/football events.  He is now offering tickets to NJPW and other pro wrestling events.  He has always, or at least for a long time, offered tickets to danpatsu-shiki as well as jungyo events.  I looked at his site just now & he's offering tickets to a Sept 30 danpatsu-shiki event.  He's also offering tickets to what I think are jungyo events in Aug in several cities, and also tickets to the annual sumo charity event in Feb 2023.  A Japanese friend of mine (lives in Japan) buys his ticket to the basho from buysumotickets.com because it's so convenient.  I'm sure it's been tough to keep afloat during the pandemic, but by diversifying, he's managed to stay in business.  Plus he's honest and 100% reliable.  A thought just occurred to me.  Another crucial factor that I'm sure has helped his business is the fact that he ships tickets to people's homes and businesses.  By using his services, the Japanese wouldn't have to go anywhere (and be exposed to Covid) to purchase their tickets -- just wait for them to come in the mail.

Regarding the food, yes, you're right about being able to find good affordable food at and around train stations.  And as you of course know, there's a JR train station very close to the Kokugikan with a street right around the corner with numerous little inexpensive places to eat.  Also a couple of convenience stores.  Even a multi-story McDonald's (try their teriyaki burger.  It's good!).  That's great that you have a friend who could give you a list of good places to eat.  Can't beat that!

Now if Japan would just open up to tourists .................................

 

Edited by sumojoann
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