Akinomaki

Aki 2022 discussion (results)

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8 minutes ago, Yamanashi said:

ACKshully, I found this twitter post suggesting that Isegahama and Sadogatake had a sit-down with Tagonoura (with the blessing of Hakkaku) and told him the power had shifted -- Takayasu was going to hqve to lose this one.  Here's the tweet:

https://twitter.com/kotttone/status/1573896133797359617

Edit: Er, wait, Google Translate may have screwed up a little bit.  Is there any way to erase a post?

You can use delete post under the options tab. (Sigh...)

Edited by Kishinoyama

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A very Tamawashi style yusho! The last two days he really brought 100% of his power. He really plays it safe usually to keep his ironman thing going.

 

16 hours ago, Octofuji said:

Takayasu has a Charlie Chaplin kesho mawashi??!

Charlie Chaplin was/is big in Japan and actually when Chaplin went to Japan, he was saved from assassination (and the prime minister's son) because they decided to go to a sumo basho.

https://japantoday.com/category/features/lifestyle/charlie-chaplin-tramps-his-way-past-a-japanese-coup-d’etat

Just for curiosity sake, this is the torikumi Charlie Chaplin would have seen: http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Results.aspx?b=193205&d=3

Edited by Tsuchinoninjin
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38 minutes ago, Tsuchinoninjin said:

Charlie Chaplin was/is big in Japan and actually when Chaplin went to Japan, he was saved from assassination (and the prime minister's son) because they decided to go to a sumo basho.

https://japantoday.com/category/features/lifestyle/charlie-chaplin-tramps-his-way-past-a-japanese-coup-d’etat

Just for curiosity sake, this is the torikumi Charlie Chaplin would have seen: http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Results.aspx?b=193205&d=3

Thank you for the information and what an absorbing article!

Chaplin got to see a lot of exotic kimarite in one day.

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Thinking about how Takayasu missed out on a yusho again, I was struck by just how close he came to Yokozuna in 2018. He finished that year with five kachikoshi, missing only one basho to due to injury. Among those KK’s, he had back-to-back 12-3JYs. That’s agonizingly close. 12-3 has been good enough to win three of the five basho this year (March, May and July). Terunofuji has won four of his seven championships with 12-3 records. If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope. Sumo can be cruel that way. One or two losses can affect the whole course of a career.

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Just now, Eikokurai said:

If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope.

He'd have to still be Ozeki...

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2 minutes ago, Reonito said:

He'd have to still be Ozeki...

He was in January and March 2018, so if he were transferring them to today, he’d be an Ozeki.

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Interesting side note, it was Takayasu's day 8 victory over Tamawashi in Nagoya 2019 where he suffered the injury that marked the beginning of the end of his upper sanyaku career.

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17 minutes ago, Godango said:

Interesting side note, it was Takayasu's day 8 victory over Tamawashi in Nagoya 2019 where he suffered the injury that marked the beginning of the end of his upper sanyaku career.

He’s never been the same since, but at least he put up Solid Ozeki numbers this basho.

Please take note Shodai and Mitakeumi.

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3 hours ago, Tsuchinoninjin said:

A very Tamawashi style yusho! The last two days he really brought 100% of his power. He really plays it safe usually to keep his ironman thing going.

 

Charlie Chaplin was/is big in Japan and actually when Chaplin went to Japan, he was saved from assassination (and the prime minister's son) because they decided to go to a sumo basho.

https://japantoday.com/category/features/lifestyle/charlie-chaplin-tramps-his-way-past-a-japanese-coup-d’etat

Just for curiosity sake, this is the torikumi Charlie Chaplin would have seen: http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Results.aspx?b=193205&d=3

You can see the kesho mawashi on Takayasu in his db photo.

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1 hour ago, Eikokurai said:

Thinking about how Takayasu missed out on a yusho again, I was struck by just how close he came to Yokozuna in 2018. He finished that year with five kachikoshi, missing only one basho to due to injury. Among those KK’s, he had back-to-back 12-3JYs. That’s agonizingly close. 12-3 has been good enough to win three of the five basho this year (March, May and July). Terunofuji has won four of his seven championships with 12-3 records. If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope. Sumo can be cruel that way. One or two losses can affect the whole course of a career.

What are some other good examples of this? i.e. a rikishi coming within 1-2 wins of a career-changing event but it going the other way? Terunofuji comes to mind. In March 2017 he lost twice to Kisenosato on senshuraku. A win in regulation would have given Teru a 14-1 yusho. A win in the playoff would have been a 13-2Y. He followed that basho with a 12-3JY. One more win in March and one more in in May and he’d have made Yokozuna four years earlier and he’d likely be retired already from injury.

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6 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

What are some other good examples of this? i.e. a rikishi coming within 1-2 wins of a career-changing event but it going the other way? Terunofuji comes to mind. In March 2017 he lost twice to Kisenosato on senshuraku. A win in regulation would have given Teru a 14-1 yusho. A win in the playoff would have been a 13-2Y. He followed that basho with a 12-3JY. One more win in March and one more in in May and he’d have made Yokozuna four years earlier and he’d likely be retired already from injury.

Just go to the db and look for sekitori who maxed out at Sekiwake.  If they had more than five basho at Sekiwake, it's a pretty good bet they were knocking on the Ozeki door at least once. 

An example is Kotonishiki, who started his Sekiwake career with 10-5 (G,S), 11-4 (G), 9-6.  With three Yokozuna in the mix each basho, his losses to M8 Daishoyama (twice) and M7 Akebono (well, OK) were the difference between 30 wins and 33 wins.  Later he had two-basho records of 13-2Y, 12-3J and 11-4J, 13-2J, but they started from Maegashira ranks.

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9 hours ago, hakutorizakura said:

Congrats Tamawashi!! Takayasu tried his best, but no stopping beast-mode Tama. Hope his sansho photo is not as sad as last time :-D

That vid I mentioned: I'm no expert, but that seems to be a genuine smile on Takayasu's face when he sees Tamawashi.

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8 hours ago, junsan said:

Omedeto to Tetsujin Tamawashi! His eccentric training paid off!

3.jpg.d0c3c7202b7191e69c8f5494a2f9a7ef.jpg

 

I guess this exercise is supposed to simulate a bout against Ichinojo? 

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Aki 2022 is in the books, and it certainly met the Wacky criterion.  For those who will be back for Kyushu in November, enjoy the break!

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2 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

That vid I mentioned: I'm no expert, but that seems to be a genuine smile on Takayasu's face when he sees Tamawashi.

It's so heartwarming to see two athletes (in any sport) smiling and being nice to each other after a hard-fought match (Heart...)

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2 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/202209250001072.html

Bit of a humorous take, but an article from a Nikkan reporter who experienced Tamawashi's nodowa while on a visit to the heya.

That's interesting, it uncovers this new dimension of nodowa I did not know about. Apparently it gives your opponent some fright (sure, when someone's grabbing your neck...), so it has some mental effect too.

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7 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Thinking about how Takayasu missed out on a yusho again, I was struck by just how close he came to Yokozuna in 2018. He finished that year with five kachikoshi, missing only one basho to due to injury. Among those KK’s, he had back-to-back 12-3JYs. That’s agonizingly close. 12-3 has been good enough to win three of the five basho this year (March, May and July). Terunofuji has won four of his seven championships with 12-3 records. If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope. Sumo can be cruel that way. One or two losses can affect the whole course of a career.

I don't want to be the dream-shattering guy, but even if Takayasu had managed to get 12-3J & 13-2Y (for instance) he could have been not promoted still. Some time ago I checked the actual number of victories needed to trigger a Yokozuna promotion, and I found out that the "golden number" is 26/30, with 25/30 being usually accepted only for Y-Y (and not for J-Y). I'm not even sure that a 12-3Y & 12-3Y (24/30) would be enough for the YDC. This is especially true in post-1987 cases, including the 'new relaxed rules' that promoted Kakuryu and Kisenosato with a J-Y combination.

Although many in this forum call that 'Kisenosato rule' or 'Kakuryu rule', this was actually the 'Kaiou rule' and was first on the table after the latter's 13-2Y & 12-3J in Aki-Kyushu 2004. Kaiou was told beforehand he needed a 13-2 to be promoted (total 26/30), and the YDC ultimately rejected his case exactly because he missed one win. To put things in perspective, Kakuryu was promoted with a 14-1DJ & 14-1Y (28/30), Kisenosato with a 12-3J & 14-1Y (26/30), and Terunofuji with a 12-3PY & 14-1J (26/30). Also, both Kisenosato and Terunofuji had a extremely strong record to further back their claims. Things can even be worse. Hakuho was for instance denied promotion in 2006 despite his 14-1PY & 13-2J (27/30) as a shin-Ozeki on the grounds that Asashoryu sat out in the tournament he won.

In other words, Takayasu missed the rope by a bit more than one bout back in 2018, and even in this "low standards" year a 12-3J & 13-2Y would unlikely trigger a promotion (especially in Haru and Aki as Terunofuji had to pull out early on). Hatsu 2018 was won by Tochinoshin with a 14-1Y. Takayasu faced him, and lost, on Day 3. Had he won, they would have finished both 13-2 and faced each other again in a playoff, so Tayayasu would have needed to win two bouts to get even a 13-2Y in Hatsu. Haru 2018 was won by Kakuryu with a 13-2Y. Takayasu actually won their match on Day 15, so he did his part there. He should have then won another bout elsewhere to trigger a playoff. Two more bouts to win, again. To change his fortunes Takayasu should have won at least three bouts - not less - he actually lost or never had to make up a 13-2Y & 13-2J (26/30) either way.

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8 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

That vid I mentioned: I'm no expert, but that seems to be a genuine smile on Takayasu's face when he sees Tamawashi.

I don´t know about Japananese customs, but in my culture shaking one´s hand using both of yours is pretty rare. It signals it is truly heartfelt. A very nice gesture to watch.

Edited by Gospodin

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1 hour ago, Gospodin said:

I don´t know about Japananese customs, but in my culture shaking one´s hand using both of yours is pretty rare. It signals it is truly heartfelt. A very nice gesture to watch.

Hmm; Tamawashi's mother is Mongolian, Takayasu's is Filipino.  I'm not sure that has anything to do with it, but your post made me wonder.

[Edit: I notice neither of them gave more than a neutral head bob beforehand -- no bow].

Edited by Yamanashi
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Oshozan thoroughly deserves his 6-1 record this basho. After winning his fourth bout he couldn't stand flat on his left foot and had to hobble away on the heel. I took a screenshot because I was sure I'd be using it to report his kyujo, but he stayed in and won his remaining bouts. Valiant effort from the longest-serving rikishi in Naruto-beya.

CPHnncsT_o.jpg

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19 hours ago, Koorifuu said:

As far as public knowledge goes, he doesn't. But that's a huge 'if'.

The chances of a Dewanoumi-beya yusho-winning ozeki not being able to get hold of a kabu are surely close to zero. 

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58 minutes ago, ryafuji said:

The chances of a Dewanoumi-beya yusho-winning ozeki not being able to get hold of a kabu are surely close to zero. 

I don't doubt for a second they'll shove whomever off the kyokai the moment a willing Mitakeumi retires, à la Goeido. But the question was more about whether he owns a kabu in this very moment, which is very unlikely.

Edited by Koorifuu

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1 hour ago, Yubinhaad said:

I took a screenshot because I was sure I'd be using it to report his kyujo, but he stayed in and won his remaining bouts. Valiant effort from the longest-serving rikishi in Naruto-beya.

Note the presence of Naruto Oyakata on the right in the picture!

Oshozan (HD 3/2016) and Honma (HD 3/2017) started in Sadogatake before Kotooshu opened Narutobeya.

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