HappySumo

Solo drills for tachi power

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I am practicing for an amateur sumo tournament in America and I am 37. I would like to develop a stronger Tachi and I would appreciate any drills or advice. 

Currently my only drill is to launch from the Tachi up a grassy hill. Trying to stay low. I feel a different strain than when I do shiko or slow exercise. 

I feel comfortable getting low and keeping my feet planted. I am not using both legs in tandem yet. 

Any advice would be helpful. 

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Hi HappySumo,  Welcome to Sumo Forum!  We hope you will stick around.  There are many experts here that can offer their helpful advice.  I'm not one of them! lol  However, I make up for it with enthusiasm.  The first thing I would suggest is finding a partner to train with.  It's hard to develop your tachiai skills on your own, as you have undoubtedly realized.  Are you close to any amateur sumo clubs?  If not, do you know anyone near you who is also interested in sumo and knows enough to be able to be your training partner?  It wouldn't need to be anyone who is interested in competing, just someone who knows enough to be a good training partner.  I have located some information that might help you.  It is sumo self-training information on the usasumo site.  It gives you a list of recommended exercises that you can do alone as well as with a team.  https://www.usasumo.com/learn/sumo-training/

I want to wish you good luck at the amateur sumo tournament.  Where is this tournament located & when will it take place?

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Here is a link to some sumo classes that are currently being offered in Southern California.  (Carson is a city in the Greater Los Angeles Area).  I don't know where you live but if you can make it out there, they could really help you reach your goals.  https://www.usasumo.com/learn/sumo-classes/

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A tackling or blocking sled seems like it might be helpful for this.

I have seen some high schools leave these hanging around on the field.

UsingBlockingSledsPowerSpeed.jpg

Edited by Katooshu
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Thanks for all of the replies. I have tried to find a Sumo club but there are no active clubs within 2 hours of Baltimore. I drove to Reading PA and had light tachi practice with a guy there. However his club isn't active.

I have a pretty good fitness routine set up with all of the basics but I would like to supplement that with drills for explosive power. 

 

I start BJJ practice tomorrow to get some more hands on grappling experience but it won't give me the same training opportunity. 

A tackling seld would be great I just don't have and couldn't get one. 

Thank you all for the suggestions. 

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If you have access to a freestanding heavy bag, that might work too. I had one of these and it was quite the workout trying to move it around, more exhausting than punching it. You fill it with sand or water to weigh it down. Nowhere near the cost of the tackling sleds and martial arts/boxing/fitness gyms might have one.

What about pushing a car in an empty parking lot :-D

Edited by Katooshu

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The heavy bag isn't a bad idea but I also don't have one. I may have access to one if I join this BJJ school I'm trying out. 

 

I saw a jumping exercise the Korena Ssireum wrestles do which might be a good way to build the explosive muscle. It's at 2:07

 

Right now I'll keep exploding up the hill. I do 2 minute rounds with 1:30 rest. It's pretty good because I train barefoot and the hill is slippery. But I don't think it's enough. I'm considering getting weights or bags of rocksalt to either carry or pick up midway up the hill. 

20211012_064429.jpg

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If anyone is interested I'm also rolling Bulgarian split squats into my leg routine and they make me hate life. 

 

So I highly recommend them. 

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8 hours ago, Katooshu said:

What about pushing a car in an empty parking lot :-D

Not a bad idea!!!  Araiwa (Cal Martin), the first Caucasian pro sumo rikishi in Japan, used to push a car around the streets of Tokyo.  (See story below).

Hanakago Oyakata's daughter's car.  She would steer the car while he pushed it around the streets of Tokyo.  She would invite her friends to pile into the car with her to make it more challenging.  He did this after regular sumo practice and it would sometimes last for almost 2 hours.  Look how tired and sweaty he looks! 

50549791192_deb079b153_w.jpg

 

Edited by sumojoann
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Would be fun if I had someone to break and steer. My car is also a hybrid so it'd be pretty heavy. 

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That picture is fantastic. My lineman coach 20 years ago used to have a saying when it got hot and we were working hard "I can smell the bacon" 

 

You can smell that picture 

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Find a steep place with tarmac and do short bursts uphill. I think Mitakeumi does it that way. There are several post showing rikishi during training outside the heya, but i can't find them right now. Maybe someone else is better at searching the forum. I'm 100% positive you can use that stuff.

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I have been sprinting uphill from the starting position. It was the only thing I could think of. I try to stay low and move like you do in the foot sliding drill. 

 

Glad to hear that it is a recognized effective way to train. 

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You might want to give Andrew Freund, the Director of USASumo, a call at 1-310-288-3641.  They're based in Los Angeles but he might be able to tell you of a sumo club somewhere in your area.  He's a very personable man and always happy to help.

EDIT -- Add link to Director Andrew Freund's bio.  https://www.usasumo.com/directors-bio/

Edited by sumojoann
Add link to Director

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Here is a page from the United States Sumo Federation website with a map showing where there are sumo clubs in the US.  If there are no sumo clubs in your area, there may be an Organizer who can arrange sumo practices.  https://www.ussumo.org/map

Worth checking into.

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5 minutes ago, sumojoann said:

Here is a page from the United States Sumo Federation website with a map showing where there are sumo clubs in the US.  If there are no sumo clubs in your area, there may be an Organizer who can arrange sumo practices.  https://www.ussumo.org/map

Worth checking into.

Thank you. One of the first things I did was Google all the USA sumo and USSF info. I have tried to contact everyone listed on the USSF website withing 2 to 3 hours of me and I've had limited success. One guy 2 hours away who was kind enough to practice with me despite his leg injury. 

 

I'm am still open to finding more people but I have exhausted the obvious avenues.

 

I even met a local martial arts equipment dealer on the recommendation of an instructor I contacted and didn't find any leads. 

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Hi @HappySumo, I've only been training sumo for about a year so don't take this as an expert opinion.

Parroting some of the above, but my exercice physiologist has ben doing the following specifically for power:

 - high box jumps (really try to explode from the jump)

- Sled pushes

- suriashi with an exercise band around your waist for resistance/someone holding on to the back of you/your mawashi

Those are the tachiai specific exercise I can think of. At sumo training itself there's a lot of chest lending, etc. It's a shame you can't find a club closer to home, but hopefully this helps a little until you meet someone like-minded.

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1 minute ago, Godango said:

Hi @HappySumo, I've only been training sumo for about a year so don't take this as an expert opinion.

Parroting some of the above, but my exercice physiologist has ben doing the following specifically for power:

 - high box jumps (really try to explode from the jump)

- Sled pushes

- suriashi with an exercise band around your waist for resistance/someone holding on to the back of you/your mawashi

Those are the tachiai specific exercise I can think of. At sumo training itself there's a lot of chest lending, etc. It's a shame you can't find a club closer to home, but hopefully this helps a little until you meet someone like-minded.

Thank you so much for your advice. Box jumps are definitely something I think I should incorporate. 

 

I am starting BJJ classes tomorrow at a sports focused training facility. My hope is that will give me some of what I need. Also maybe they'll get interested in sumo. 

 

Thanks again you have several good suggestions 

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3 minutes ago, HappySumo said:

Thank you so much for your advice. Box jumps are definitely something I think I should incorporate. 

 

I am starting BJJ classes tomorrow at a sports focused training facility. My hope is that will give me some of what I need. Also maybe they'll get interested in sumo. 

 

Thanks again you have several good suggestions 

BJJ is good, grappling training definitely helps. My coach has been a top 5 world games finisher in his sumo division, and is also a podium finisher in Judo/wrestling here in Australia. I would definitely recommend wrestling if you're able, as I think that has a higher crossover to sumo than BJJ both in conditioning and the tie-up, and Judo is good for learning some throws.

But again, that's me of little experience talking.

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I took a look at the USSF map & it looks like the closest Organizer to you is in or near Wash, DC.  His name is Nikol Gontscharenko, e-mail is nikolgonts@gmail.com.  It's not a club as such, but he's an Organizer of sumo practices.  Was he one of the ones you tried to contact?

And did you try calling Andrew Freund 1-310-288-3641?  Even though he is the Director of USASumo, I had no problem reaching him several years ago when I had a question about obtaining an old sumo program.  In fact, he answered the phone himself!  The only time he might be hard to reach would be just before or during a tournament.

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2 minutes ago, sumojoann said:

I took a look at the USSF map & it looks like the closest Organizer to you is in or near Wash, DC.  His name is Nikol Gontscharenko, e-mail is nikolgonts@gmail.com.  It's not a club as such, but he's an Organizer of sumo practices.  Was he one of the ones you tried to contact?

And did you try calling Andrew Freund 1-310-288-3641?  Even though he is the Director of USASumo, I had no problem reaching him several years ago when I had a question about obtaining an old sumo program.  In fact, he answered the phone himself!  The only time he might be hard to reach would be just before or during a tournament.

I appreciate your enthusiasm. I did do most of the obvious stuff first.

The first person I emailed was the organizer in DC. They never responded. 

I also emailed a guy in reading PA which is a bit far but his club is mostly defunct. I emailed a guy in NJ which is way too far and he is also solo.

I emailed the people in West Virginia and got no response. 

I did not call Andrew as he is in California and I don't really know him. 

I may put my contact info on the website as an organizer and see if there is any interest but I'm working on what I can for now. 

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Here is a photo of Mitakeumi posted by Kintamayama.  The description indicated he was doing "mountain training", keiko in the outdoors.  I don't see any mountains --- looks kind of flat to me!  (See description below).

Mitakeumi did some "mountain training" (keiko in the outdoors) with the "young guys", as the report says. There is an airfield close by where light aircraft and helicopters were buzzing around. Mitakeumi enjoyed that, so much so that he decided to "handle" one.

御嶽海「気持ちがいい」お茶目すぎる手乗りヘリ

 

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22 minutes ago, sumojoann said:

Here is a photo of Mitakeumi posted by Kintamayama.  The description indicated he was doing "mountain training", keiko in the outdoors.  I don't see any mountains --- looks kind of flat to me!  (See description below).

Mitakeumi did some "mountain training" (keiko in the outdoors) with the "young guys", as the report says. There is an airfield close by where light aircraft and helicopters were buzzing around. Mitakeumi enjoyed that, so much so that he decided to "handle" one.

御嶽海「気持ちがいい」お茶目すぎる手乗りヘリ

 

Great picture. My very limited knowledge of Japan makes me think you don't have to go far to find mountains in a lot of places. 

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I contacted the Director of USA Sumo, Andrew Freund, on his direct line 1-310-617-9641 (a different tel #) and explained your situation.  He told me he grew up in Columbia, MD.   He said offhand he didn't know of a club or organizer in your general area.  However, their organization receives numerous calls from all over the US asking for the very same information.  He offered to try to help you find someone.  He told me that you could either call him at the above tel # OR e-mail him at director@usasumo.com (either way is fine) and he can look through some of the names of the people who have called asking for help.  Maybe he could find someone and then match you up.  I recommend you follow up on this.  I don't know Andrew either but he's always glad to help.

Wishing you good luck in your quest!

'

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5 minutes ago, HappySumo said:

Great picture. My very limited knowledge of Japan makes me think you don't have to go far to find mountains in a lot of places. 

That's true.  There are many mountainous areas in Japan, just not in this picture.

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