Kaninoyama

Takagenji Caught Smoking Weed

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Just now, Kujo said:

There is a small percentage of rikishi who come from university sumo programs.

I would assume some actually go to classes and get some kind of degree.

Or do they major in sumo at their university?

I am guessing someone on the forum would have more insight as to whether they actually attend classes.

Asanoyama and Endo have economics degrees, and Shodai has one in international food information science. Sumo is more a co-curricular activity and isn't a program of study per se - a "unviersity sumo program" doesn't mean you get a degree in sumo, just that that university has actually gone to the bother of being rigorous about a co-curricular activity to the extent that it has become renowned for it.

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1 hour ago, Seiyashi said:

Asanoyama and Endo have economics degrees, and Shodai has one in international food information science. Sumo is more a co-curricular activity and isn't a program of study per se - a "unviersity sumo program" doesn't mean you get a degree in sumo, just that that university has actually gone to the bother of being rigorous about a co-curricular activity to the extent that it has become renowned for it.

Sorry Seiyashi, I wasn't clear about what I meant by majoring in sumo.

What I meant is there are university athletes on scholarships at US "sports mill" schools who don't go to class, have others doing their school work for them etc and still get a degree (the term was a degree in basket weaving).

I was curious as to whether this was prevalent in Japan. 

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4 minutes ago, Kujo said:

Sorry Seiyashi, I wasn't clear about what I meant by majoring in sumo.

What I meant is there are university athletes on scholarships at US "sports mill" schools who don't go to class, have others doing their school work for them etc and still get a degree (the term was a degree in basket weaving).

I was curious as to whether this was prevalent in Japan. 

Ah, I see. I didn't know that was a common practice. I confess I'm not sure, although those more acquainted with amateur sumo should know.

I think, considering that there were plenty of not-quite jibes about Asanoyama putting the economics degree to use, that they're actually legitimately still having to do the coursework.

Edited by Seiyashi

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6 hours ago, Kujo said:

There is a small percentage of rikishi who come from university sumo programs.

I would assume some actually go to classes and get some kind of degree.

Or do they major in sumo at their university?

I am guessing someone on the forum would have more insight as to whether they actually attend classes.

I have met a lecturer in English communication who taught at the business faculty in Kindai university; who fondly remembers Takarafuji & Homarefuji.

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13 hours ago, Kujo said:

There is a small percentage of rikishi who come from university sumo programs.

I would assume some actually go to classes and get some kind of degree.

Or do they major in sumo at their university?

I am guessing someone on the forum would have more insight as to whether they actually attend classes.

Sumo is an incredibly injury-prone sport at the amateur levels as well, so any prospective future pro career could be over at any moment. The great majority of guys that get recruited into their respective universities due to their sumo prowess end up in white collar jobs anyway rather than in Ozumo, so I'm fairly sure the "normal" state of things is that their educational performance is like that of any other student.

(There's also the fact that nobody since Miyabiyama over two decades ago has decided to forego their degree and drop out of university to go pro early when they got a tsukedashi qualification before their final year.)

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Thanks Asashosakari-san, it's good to hear they are getting an education.
 

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2 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

(There's also the fact that nobody since Miyabiyama over two decades ago has decided to forego their degree and drop out of university to go pro early when they got a tsukedashi qualification before their final year.)

And Shodai had such a qualification his second year - he could have had probably 3 more years as a sekitori if he had left then.  Now he's certain to be eligible for becoming an elder, but that's impossible to tell at the time you get that early qualification.

I think I've commented before that I think it's good that there's more people that went to college that are oyakata either now or will be soon in the future; I don't know what all they studied, but anything is better than most of the oyakata who left school at 15 in terms of trying to run a professional sport.  And I can't imagine Japanese culture would suffer the kind of academic abuses that take place in NCAA football and basketball.

Edited by Gurowake
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4 hours ago, Asojima said:

I hear that Takagenji plans to open a taco stand in Mexico City. ;-)

Wasn't it a coffee shop in Amsterdam? ;-)

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4 hours ago, Asojima said:

I hear that Takagenji plans to open a taco stand in Mexico City. ;-)

Call it Tacogenji?

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7 hours ago, Asojima said:

I hear that Takagenji plans to open a taco stand in Mexico City. ;-)

Will they be garlic tako tacos?

Those are the best kind (especially in san diego)  ;-)

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Why not both close to eachother? Make them hungy with Takaganja and then cash in on their munchies a second time with Tacogenji. Sometimes My Genius... It's Almost Frightening.

Edited by Benihana
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2 hours ago, Benihana said:

Sometimes My Genius... It's Almost Frightening.

Well, it's not the kitty cat avatar, so it must be your genius.

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He will not be prosecuted. Reason not given. Just a laconic statement that he wont be prosecuted.

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6 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

He will not be prosecuted. Reason not given. Just a laconic statement that he wont be prosecuted.

Does this include not even a monetary fine?

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7 hours ago, Godango said:

Does this include not even a monetary fine?

No indictment means no trial, and no fine. In other words, he did nothing that's worth prosecuting and was fired for that

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3 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

he did nothing that's worth prosecuting and was fired for that

Lawsuit incoming?

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Well, other expulsions for criminal behaviour never made it to trial either, like Takatoriki, Kotomitsuki, Wakanoho, etc. It's not like this is vindicating him.

In fact, when's the last time a rikishi actually did dragged in front of a judge?

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5 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

No indictment means no trial, and no fine. In other words, he did nothing that's worth prosecuting and was fired for that

I'm not sure about the Japanese context, but at least in other countries, the prosecution has a number of alternative measures available other than pursuing charges. This can involve an individual agreeing to abide by certain restrictions, engaging in voluntary community service, etc., in return for prosecution not being pursued. Failure to abide by the terms of the agreement means that charges on the underlying offence can/will be pursued. Often used for first time non-violent offenders to see about preventing future offences without unduly harming societal prospects (which often encourages rather than discourages future offences). 

Not that there is any evidence this is what happened here, and assuming such alternative or diversionary measures are available in Japan, but simply pointing out that just because charges aren't being pursued doesn't mean that some action hasn't been taken of which the public isn't being made aware. 

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2 hours ago, yohcun said:

 

In fact, when's the last time a rikishi actually did dragged in front of a judge?

Wakakirin? He spent some time in jail before he was given bail, though his eventual prison sentence was suspended. 

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I'm pretty sure there was at least one dismissed / "voluntarily" retired rikishi in the past where the prosecutor specifically didn't press charges because they felt him losing his job in sumo was punishment enough. 

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