Amamaniac

Kensho Natsu 2021

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Posted (edited)

Day 1

15:  Asanoyama

11: Takakeisho

6:  Terunofuji

6:  Mitakeumi

6:  Endo

5:  Takayasu

4:  Shodai

3: Terutsuyoshi

2:  Kotoeko

2:  Takarafuji

2:  Tamawashi

2: Hoshoryu

 

Edited by Amamaniac
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Posted (edited)

Day 2

26:  Mitakeumi

15:  Asanoyama

14:  Endo

12:  Terunofuji

11: Takakeisho

8:  Takayasu

5:  Meisei, Wakatakakage

4:  Shodai

3:  Ichinojo, Daieisho, Terutsuyoshi

Edited by Amamaniac
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Posted (edited)

Day 3

30:  Mitakeumi

21:  Terunofuji

20:  Takakeisho

15:  Asanoyama, Shodai

14:  Endo

12:  Takayasu

10:  Wakatakakage

8:  Tamawashi

5:  Takarafuji, Kotoeko, Meisei

Edited by Amamaniac
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A little surprised to see how Terunofuji behind Mitakeumi. Is he not attracting much outside of what is usually put on the last few bouts?

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34 minutes ago, Rocks said:

A little surprised to see how Terunofuji behind Mitakeumi. Is he not attracting much outside of what is usually put on the last few bouts?

He took home 6 on day 1, 6 on day 2, and 9 today.  Since he is currently the lowest ranked of the four Ozeki, he has yet to fight in a final bout of the day.  That all changes tomorrow, so as long as he wins that, his total should jump up considerably, and he will overtake Mitakeumi.  Mitakeumi benefitted early from upsetting Takakeisho on day 2 in the final bout of that day.

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19 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

so as long as he wins that

Oh, he did win that! :) Really curious about the new numbers! :) Btw, thanks for posting them!

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Posted (edited)

Day 4

39:  Terunofuji

30:  Mitakeumi

29:  Takakeisho

26:  Asanoyama

23:  Endo

18:  Shodai

15:  Wakatakakage

12:  Takayasu

8:  Tamawashi

6:  Takanosho

Terunofuji picked up 18 kensho in his ferocious victory over didn't-know-what-hit-him Mitakeumi.  Both Takakeisho and Asanoyama are staying close (Shodai not so much).  But the kensho race has the makings of being exciting given that each Ozeki has a turn at the big final-bout pots on a rotating basis.

Back in March, Terunofuji may have won the Emperor's Cup (and all the monetary benefits associated with the championship), but Asanoyama took home the most kensho.  

Edited by Amamaniac
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Day 5

46:  Terunofuji

45:  Asanoyama

41:  Takakeisho

36:  Mitakeumi

31:  Endo

26:  Shodai

17:  Takayasu

15:  Wakatakakage

8:  Tamawashi

7:  Kotoeko

Asanoyama made up a lot of ground (19 kensho) today with his (toe-)nail-biting win over Tobizaru in the final bout of the day.  Takakeisho also gained a lot of ground.  I suspect that the winner of the "final kensho total" race will be the Ozeki who manages to defeat the most of his fellow Ozeki.  

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Day 6

56:  Takakeisho

54:  Terunofuji

45:  Asanoyama

36:  Mitakeumi

31:  Endo

26:  Shodai

25:  Takayasu

15:  Kiribayama, Wakatakakage

10:  Ichinojo

Asanoyama missed his opportunity to gain 12 kensho, forfeiting them to an impressive Kiribayama.  In other words, Asanoyama would have been sitting at the top of this list if only he had managed to get a grip on the Mongolian's mawashi...  The battle for cash continues.

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34 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

31:  Endo

5th on the list and the highest ranked guy he has faced is an M6. It's good to be the Endo. 

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31 minutes ago, Rocks said:

5th on the list and the highest ranked guy he has faced is an M6. It's good to be the Endo.

All he has to do is win his bouts and he's laughing all the way to the bank.  His bouts regularly attract about 6 kensho (i.e., from regular sponsors), and occasionally a few more depending on who his opponent is.  It's a double-edged sword though.  With that many kensho on the line, Endo's opponents have more incentive to beat him in the ring.

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Posted (edited)

Day 7

66:  Takakeisho

64:  Terunofuji

56:  Asanoyama

41:  Shodai, Mitakeumi

38:  Endo

25:  Takayasu

15:  Kiribayama, Wakatakakage

11:  Ichinojo

For the first time this tournament, the four Ozeki hold the top four slots on the above list.  By winning the final bout of the day, Shodai was able to draw even with Mitakeumi in fourth place.

Edited by Amamaniac
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Day 8

84:  Terunofuji

76:  Takakeisho

56:  Asanoyama

51:  Mitakeumi

44:  Endo

41:  Shodai

31:  Takayasu

17:  Wakatakakage

16:  Hoshoryu

15:  Kiribayama

Terunofuji retook the top spot on this list, but as long Takakeisho wins tomorrow, he will bounce back on top. The seesaw battle looks as though it will be down to Terunofuji and Takakeisho.  But, despite having four losses, Asanoyama is not completely out of the picture.  But he could have used the 12 he gave to Hoshoryu today.

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Day 9

96:  Terunofuji

76:  Asanoyama, Takakeisho

55: Mitakeumi

50:  Endo

41:  Shodai

31:  Takayasu

20:  Hoshoryu

17:  Wakatakakage

16:  Kotonowaka, Chiyotairyu

Terunofuji came close to cracking 100 kensho, but will just have to get another win before he passes that benchmark.  At this point, the question on the table is what will his final total be?  Of course, that will depend greatly on whether or not he produces a zensho yusho.

It is interesting that Hoshoryu total has surpassed that of Wakatakakage, both wrestlers having two Ozeki scalps under their mawashi.  The difference came when Hoshoryu upset Asanoyama for 12, whereas Wakatakakage only snagged 5 against the top-ranked Ozeki.  This illustrates that timing (of upsets) is everything.

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Wow! Kotonowaka and Chiyotairyu are new names on the list... I wonder what's the deal with them, I mean do they have personal kensho, or they are just fishing from other guys? 

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7 hours ago, Wakaebala said:

Wow! Kotonowaka and Chiyotairyu are new names on the list... I wonder what's the deal with them, I mean do they have personal kensho, or they are just fishing from other guys? 

Given that Chiyotairyu won his bout on day 1 and got nothing in terms of kensho, it is pretty safe to say that he as no personal kensho.  Kotonowaka, on the other hands, regularly seems to have about two kensho on his bouts.  Other than that, they are poaching.

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Day 10

106:  Terunofuji

91:  Takakeisho

90:  Asanoyama

58:  Endo

55:  Mitakeumi

48:  Takayasu

41:  Shodai

21:  Hoshoryu

20:  Kotoeko

17:  Wakatakakage

Usually the most prize money falls on the final bout of the day, but today, the second last bout between kadoban Ozeki Shodai and Ozeki/champion wannabe Takayasu featured a total of 17 kensho (versus Takakeisho's 15, Asanoyama's 14, and Terunofuji's 10).  Kotoeko is now on the Top Ten list.  He appears to have two personal kensho, but took a nice pot of about six (6) today in his bout against Kagayaki.

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I'm probably late to this party, but is it a function of COVID and businesses not splashing out as much, or the fact that triple stacks of kensho were only really the preserve of yokozuna like Hakuho? Kensho seems to be reaching less outrageous tallies of late.

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It would make sense that sponsorship is down due to Covid.  Why spend on this type of advertising when the stadium is either empty or less than a quarter full?  (Kensho banners don't get full exposure on TV broadcasts.)

And yes, "triple stacks" are definitely more likely when you have two "healthy" Yokozuna in the ring, especially if one is Hakuho. ;-)

 

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Posted (edited)

Day 11

106:  Terunofuji

103:  Takakeisho

100:  Asanoyama

66:  Endo

55:  Mitakeumi

53:  Shodai

48:  Takayasu

26:  Myogiryu

21:  Hoshoryu

20:  Kotoeko

Despite Terunofuji's hansoku loss, Takakeisho was not able to move into the pole position on this list.  The final winner of this contest is probably going to be between Terunofuji and Takakeisho – Asanoyama's forced day 12 withdrawal will destroy his chances.  

Pretty sure Shodai is not a contender.  The more interesting issue there is who will end up with more kensho: Shodai or Endo?

Edited by Amamaniac
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Day 12

122:  Terunofuji

114:  Takakeisho

100:  Asanoyama

66:  Endo

63:  Shodai

55: Mitakeumi

48:  Takayasu

32:  Kotoeko

26:  Kotonowaka, Myogiryu

As expected, there was a reshuffling of kensho following the forced kyujo of Ozeki Asanoyama.  According to the torikumi sheet, there were 17 kensho scheduled for the Asanoyama v. Takayasu face-off.  (Poor Takayasu missed out on that payday, but at least he got the fusensho win.). 

The changes that I can confirm are: five extra kensho on Kotoeko v. Endo, two extra on Shodai v. Takanosho, two extra on Takakeisho v. Ichinojo, and two extra on Terunofuji v. Onosho.  That leaves six unaccounted for...

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Seeing Takakeisho paired against Endo (+8) in the final bout of Day 13 (++) means that there will be an extra big kensho purse on offer.  If Takakeisho manages to win, he will most likely pull far ahead of Terunofuji's total...

The final day match between Terunofuji and Takakeisho will probably decide the kensho champion for May (not to mention that championship itself)!

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Day 13

135:  Terunofuji

114:  Takakeisho

100:  Asanoyama

90:  Endo

72: Shodai

59:  Mitakeumi

55:  Takayasu

32:  Kotoeko

26:  Kotonowaka, Myogiryu

14 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

Seeing Takakeisho paired against Endo (+8) in the final bout of Day 13 (++) means that there will be an extra big kensho purse on offer.  If Takakeisho manages to win, he will most likely pull far ahead of Terunofuji's total...

Well, at least I was right about the purse.  Endo walked away with 24 kensho prize envelopes!  That was the highest number so far this tournament.  

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Newsflash: There will be 33 kensho prizes on the Takakeisho v. Shodai showdown on day 14 (tomorrow)!

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Posted (edited)

Day 14

148:  Takakeisho

135:  Terunofuji

111:  Endo

100:  Asanoyama

72:  Shodai

67:  Mitakeumi

63:  Takayasu

35:  Kotoeko

32:  Myogiryu

26:  Kotonowaka

Whoever wins tomorrow, Takakeisho or Terunofuji, it will decide whose bank account is flushest as a result of the tournament.  "How many kensho on the line?", you ask.  37.  And as for Shodai, even if he becomes the only Ozeki to beat Endo this month, he still won't crack the 100 kensho mark, as there are only 26 kensho on their bout.  Still, very much worth trying for!

Edited by Amamaniac
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