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On 17/12/2020 at 16:24, Cal Martin said:

To Hakutorizakura,

Wajima was just totally opposite of me, he was a natural at Sumo, in fact I was totally jealous of how hard I had to work at it, and it just came so easy for him. As a person away from Sumo he thought he was just a cut above everyone else. I do resent what he did to the stable and Oyakata's daughter, she was a great friend and she actually helped me practice after practice, I would push the family car around Tokyo,to build up my legs, she would steer the car. She was still in Highschool and had to learn English, I had to learn Japanese, so we had a good time helping each other. Of course this is just my opinion, but many of the other wrestlers felt as I did. Anything else I can shed some light on I will be glad to.

Happy Trails,

Cal

Thank you Cal-san! I'm sorry to hear about all the trouble he caused. I also have read his bit on wikipedia, and indeed it seems that he wasn't a character who was loved by everybody.

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I have to admit, I don't follow him on anything, it is funny though, John Gunning pointed out that he went to football after Sumo, and I started in football and went to Sumo. He was great at it, and every stable was after him, kind of like being selected first round in our NFL draft. Hanakago was as close as a second family I will ever know, and how he ruined his legacy is terrible, however this is just my opinion, probably because I was so close to him. Hanakago took a big chance on me, but he was a bit of a rebel himself, at that time all the good athletes were going to baseball, and soccer, you got money right up front, Sumo, you had to earn it. Takamiyama (who I admired greatly) was okay with the Sumo way and the Sumo life, I was just from a different cut of cloth. Great talking with you, have a very  Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Years.

Happy Trails,

Cal

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(NOTE:  The following is taken from correspondence between Cal and me.  To clear up any misunderstanding --- Cal didn't go back to the US because of his draft notice).

CAL:  No, I took my Draft exam at Camp Zama, near Tokyo.  It was an Air Force base, I think, but I'm not sure which branch. 

I went to Hanakago's on a dare.  I never planned to become a Sumotori.  I went probably to get my ass kicked.  Betty, my stepmom, told Oyakata Hanakago to make sure I lost, but to try not to hurt me. The guy I fought (I fought him 7 times and I won 4 of them, and I didn't even know the rules).  But Hanakago was so impressed with the spirit I had, that he wanted me to stay. That was a big NO from me, but Hanakago talked me into staying for a tournament, so I did.  Then I went back to the States and started working for Ford.  One of my co-workers was married to a Japanese girl, and she would always get the Japanese newspaper in which they started calling me a chickenshit, etc. So that was when I came back to Japan and took it seriously. Yes, I had to start from the bottom again. I'm not real sure how long I was gone, but the Japanese Ambassador showed up at my sister's house looking for me once, and she just knew I had done something really bad. 

My arteries in my leg are eaten up due to my time in Japan.   I got a real bad cut on my heel just before a tournament.  I kept going to the Japanese doctors and of course, they would throw some iodine on it and say you are tough and are a Sumotori, get back out there. Finally, I had red streaks running up to my balls and I couldn't put any weight on it, and I fought that day and told Hanakago I was going to a base after this fight and talk to a doctor I could understand. I was still a Marine dependent so they told me to get a hold of my parents, we might have to amputate that foot. I wouldn't tell them nothing.   My dad had just left for Korea on a month-long TDY and I said my mom is a gypsy in California somewhere. I ended up in their hospital at Yakota Air Base for 33 days (that’s another story) before I got out. I was supposed to use a wheelchair or crutches for the next 20 days, with my leg up in a sling at night. Of course, I got to know all the doctors and nurses pretty well, so you can imagine the looks on their faces when I was there (at the basho) for my first fight, and that was the tournament I won, with the nine-man play off.  I had one of the worst cases of blood poisoning and gangrene they had ever seen.  This is why Hanakago would often call Wajima names.  Wajima would complain about minor things like a splinter in his toe.  The doctors always told me that when I got older, that leg would come back to haunt me.  Well, I never planned on living past 50, so it would have been no big deal.

Edited by sumojoann
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(NOTE:  The following is taken from more correspondence between Cal and me).

Cal:  I was not even supposed to compete in the basho where I won the 9-man playoff. It started off with me begging Hanakago to just let me try and get the 4 wins so I wouldn't be demoted.  He did not want me to.  Then he wanted me to stop after I got my 4 wins.  Honestly, the foot was getting better each day, and I did stay off it.  Nishimouri would go through slow-motion practice with me as soon as he knew who I was fighting.  Usually he had already fought the guy, and/or someone in our stable had.  No one on the outside of Hanakago's stable knew about my foot because I was in a Base Hospital. You can share anything with Houmanumi or SF. I will look for some more articles.  I have some on boat and car racing.

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2 hours ago, sumojoann said:

CAL:  No, I took my Draft exam at Camp Zama, near Tokyo.  It was an Air Force base, I think, but I'm not sure which branch.  I

I am really enjoying hearing about Cal's experiences in Japan. It sounds like he should write these things down and turn them into a novel. 

Tell Cal that Camp Zama is an Army installation. Yokota is Air Force. 

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6 hours ago, Kishinoyama said:

I am really enjoying hearing about Cal's experiences in Japan. It sounds like he should write these things down and turn them into a novel. 

Tell Cal that Camp Zama is an Army installation. Yokota is Air Force. 

Actually, Cal is about halfway finished writing a book about his experiences as a rikishi.  He had a writer, I think probably a ghostwriter, helping him at one time but unfortunately, the man passed away suddenly.   Cal has been on his own since then.  If anyone knows of someone experienced who could help him finish writing the book, editing it and also help to get it published, he would be very grateful.

I'll tell Cal what you said about Camp Zama, but he reads Sumo Forum, so he might have already read what you wrote.

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On 09/12/2020 at 16:35, Houmanumi said:

Once again, @Cal Martin and @sumojoann have come through with the goods!


1. 1971 PRESS PHOTO HUNTINGTON BEACH CAL MARTIN CAUCASIAN SUMO NUDE JAPAN SPORT

Sumojoann found this image, which had apparently been featured on the forum before -- it can be purchased at this link: https://outlet.historicimages.com/products/rsb73943.

RSB73943.jpg

Cal Says: That is me.  I was at my sister's house, one of the few times that I came home for my two weeks off.  She lived in Huntington Beach, Calif.  I graduated high school just a few miles from there at Westminster High School.  The local newspaper wanted to do a story on me.  Obviously, I had no one to do up my Chonmage, so I just look like a fat hippie!  It's funny --- all the high schools I attended --- in Lubbock, Texas, in Las Vegas, Nevada and Foothills High School in Tustin, Calif, all claimed me as being from their school.  But I was a Marine brat and just moved around a lot.  The football scouts couldn't keep up with me.
 

2. Araiwa Receiving Jonidan Yusho Award + Newspaper Article Discussing his Win

Araiwa claimed the January 1970 Jonidan Yusho after taking part in (and obviously winning) a then-record 9 man play-off.

50700406661_fcd5991bd0.jpg

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Cal's Words: I remember the newspapers saying "he didn't even break a sweat" I guess I made it look easy, but it wasn't by any means. After the last fight I was leaving the ring and one of the judges had to grab me and explain to me to get back up there, all this took place between Juryo and Makunouchi division, so it was all on live TV.

3. Araiwa with Hanakago-Oyakata's Children

Here we see Araiwa (right) with one of Hanakago-oyakata's sons, Katsumi (left), and his daughter Satsuki (centre). Satsuki later married 54th Yokozuna Wajima.

50700408831_7651a9e39d.jpg

Cal's Words: This was taken out in the streets of Asaguya, after pushing around their car. I would think (Katsumi) was probably a couple of years older than me in this picture.

------

Back to me (Houmanumi) talking now. I've been trying to help Cal out with finding more information on the the children of Hanakago. The family story is a sad one; for which we already know some of the tragic details (specifically around the marriage of Satsuki and Wajima and the collapse of Hanakago-beya). What we're not sure of specifically is whether any of his children are alive today, and what they may have gone on to do with their lives. If anyone has any information to share, I'm sure Cal would appreciate it.

Feel free to PM me first if you want to make sure it's not something with already know, or if you think it's a sensitive topic.

Cheers all, and as always, many thanks to Cal and Sumojoann.

What a totally awesome thread. Thanks to everyone participating, particularly Cal, Joann and Houmanumi. I've run out of Thanks and Likes, but had to say thank you somewhere! Awesome stuff. If I'd done more professional creative writing, I'd offer to help Cal out. I will certainly read it if it ever makes it to press.

Edited by Kaminariyuki

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On a different thread, Amamaniac commented that he was curious about Cal (Araiwa's) sumo career dates.  He mentioned that Cal registered in Nov 1968 but didn't take part in an official basho until Nov 1969.  He also commented that Cal's last tournament bout was Jan 22, 1971.

JUST A NOTE:  PLEASE POST ALL COMMENTS ON THIS THREAD.  THANK YOU!

I can ask Cal to comment.  However, from what he told me, he was talked into entering his first basho by Hanakago Oyakata.  Then after the basho, he went back to the States and worked for Ford Motor for awhile until he decided to come back and rejoin Hanakago Beya.  He told me he had to start all over again.

Cal has a close relative who suddenly became very ill yesterday.  As you can imagine, it's a very stressful situation, especially at this time of the year.  If he is not up to posting, I can try to clarify this and post a comment for him or better yet, wait until he is in a better frame of mind and then discuss it with him.  That's what I'm going to do.  I will post at a later date when the situation improves.  Thank you for understanding.

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No problem, yes I did go to Hanakago's just on a dare, then he talked me into staying for one tournament(I think he thought I would get hooked), I did like it a lot, but it was good bye and I had fun, but not that much, my real interest was in building race engines. I left and as Joann says I went to work for Ford Motor Co. Seems as the Japanese newspapers were having a Hay Day with me over there, things like i would have been moved up in rank and I couldn't take it, so I went back with a vengeance, and the rest is history.  As I have said before I was not at all like Jessi, he loved the life there, me not so much, he conformed  and I was more the Mavrick.

Happy Trails,

Cal

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7 hours ago, Cal Martin said:

No problem, yes I did go to Hanakago's just on a dare, then he talked me into staying for one tournament(I think he thought I would get hooked), I did like it a lot, but it was good bye and I had fun, but not that much, my real interest was in building race engines. I left and as Joann says I went to work for Ford Motor Co. Seems as the Japanese newspapers were having a Hay Day with me over there, things like i would have been moved up in rank and I couldn't take it, so I went back with a vengeance, and the rest is history.  As I have said before I was not at all like Jessi, he loved the life there, me not so much, he conformed  and I was more the Mavrick.

Happy Trails,

Cal

Hi Cal,

I’m a professional writer and editor with a number of books to my credit and over a dozen years of experience editing manuscripts of all types across many disciplines. I would be happy to discuss helping you to ghostwrite your memoirs because I find your story fascinating and I am a huge fan of Sumo as both a sport and a culture. Please send me a message if you would like to talk about how I might help you with getting your story out there.

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2 hours ago, since_94 said:

Hi Cal,

I’m a professional writer and editor with a number of books to my credit and over a dozen years of experience editing manuscripts of all types across many disciplines. I would be happy to discuss helping you to ghostwrite your memoirs because I find your story fascinating and I am a huge fan of Sumo as both a sport and a culture. Please send me a message if you would like to talk about how I might help you with getting your story out there.

Hi, I've let Cal know about your kind offer.  I'm going to send you a private message now.  Please be on the lookout for it.

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On 17/12/2020 at 15:24, Cal Martin said:

Wajima was just totally opposite of me, he was a natural at Sumo, in fact I was totally jealous of how hard I had to work at it, and it just came so easy for him. As a person away from Sumo he thought he was just a cut above everyone else. I do resent what he did to the stable and Oyakata's daughter, she was a great friend and she actually helped me practice after practice, I would push the family car around Tokyo,to build up my legs, she would steer the car. She was still in Highschool and had to learn English, I had to learn Japanese, so we had a good time helping each other.

There is a book (in Japanese) about Wajima, amazon.co.jp/真・輪島伝-番外の人-武田頼政 - the true Wajima legend: not an ordinary person - for which his ex-wife Satsutsuki Nakashima/-jima /Wajima (I think she kept the name) was interviewed. She tells about yaocho and how Wajima ruined Hanakago-beya as oyakata and more.

A weird but highly knowledgeable guy obsessed with yaocho in sumo used to read from the book and posted it on his YT channels - 4 have been scrapped so far, the recent channel has only 2 chapters of about 10 I managed to save from earlier channels: youtube/channel/UCBKir3ek23AuVkkHNycdW5w/search?query=中島五月 - just Japanese audio, interesting to listen to, books I wouldn't normally buy.

Edit: the pics on the channel and as icons for the videos are just disguise, the guy is obsessed with the thought that those who made sure that the former Onaruto oyakata and his friend passed away at the same time, same way, same place, will be coming after him any day

Edited by Akinomaki
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Boy, sounds like he never changed, his wife Satsutsuki, was one of my best friends while i was over there, she would help me practice after practice, I would push their family car around the streets of Asaguya. She was still in Highschool and had to learn English, obviously, I had to learn Japanese. I whish I could get a hold of her today, it's a shame what Wajima did to the stable, they were like a second family to me. I actually helped recruit Wajima, it was a big mistake, but he was like the number 1 draft choice, and all the stables wanted him. I could go on for hours about this subject, but I got to go for now. Have a Merry Christmas.

Happy Trails,

Cal

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6 hours ago, Cal Martin said:

Boy, sounds like he never changed, his wife Satsutsuki, was one of my best friends while i was over there, she would help me practice after practice, I would push their family car around the streets of Asaguya. She was still in Highschool and had to learn English, obviously, I had to learn Japanese. I whish I could get a hold of her today, it's a shame what Wajima did to the stable, they were like a second family to me.

We could contact the author of the book I mentioned and ask him if he can help to have Satsusuki-san get in contact with you, Cal.

Happy holiday season,  approaching the new year

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1 hour ago, Akinomaki said:

We could contact the author of the book I mentioned and ask him if he can help to have Satsusuki-san get in contact with you, Cal.

Happy holiday season,  approaching the new year

Great idea!!  I will discuss this with Cal.  I sent you a private message.

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Sincere apologies on my part to all who have an interest in this thread; around the end of the year time got away from me and I'm not just clawing my way back. 

Below are some newspaper stories that have been sitting in my inbox for some time. I have very limited Japanese so if anybody wants to go for an in-depth translation and/or correct what I got wrong, have at it. :).

Thanks again to both Cal for sharing his stories and Joann for doing so much to help both Cal and the Forum get more information. 

1. Yusho Notice

From what I can gather, this is Araiwa's results for his yusho-winning tournament in Kyushu 1969 Hatsu 1970.

The following details are provided:

  • From California, America
  • Ranked Jonidan 23. details
  • Shikona (荒岩)
  • Real name (Kaaru Rii Maachin)
  • DOB
  • Representing Hanakago beya
  • The basho in question (Kyushu 1969 Hatsu 1970)
  • Listed height and weight (that's 5'8", 262lbs for his countrymen).

It then lists Araiwa's opponents fought by day, with the bottom stating it's Araiwa's first Jonidan yusho.

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2. Araiwa Responds to Receiving His Draft Notice

This appears to be an article about Araiwa's draft notice, and how it may hurt his prospects and the effect on his mood. Araiwa uses the example of Takiyama who was disqualified from the draft due to being overweight to ease the community concern at losing their prospect. We see Hanakago oyakata comforting Araiwa, with the bottom image praising Araiwa's chonmage.

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3. The Return of Araiwa

This article is about Araiwa returning to ozumo; the second headline pays special attention to his yawn (which is truly fantastic). 

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4. Yusho Winners Kyushu 1969 Hatsu 1970

This is a photo of all Juryo and under yusho winners of Kyushu 1969 Hatsu 1970. Some special focus is given  the American Araiwa capturing the Jonidan yusho. He's second from the right in the group image.

 50934384147_a98cdd3c0d_z.jpg

Edited by Houmanumi
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I whish I could describe that day, all I knew is that I had lost a fight and that was never good enough to win the division. I was getting dressed and going to head back to the stable, Nishimouri, (Kaiketsu), kept saying, No, he finally wrote down "it's a tie", you still have to fight, now go win it. I had no idea there was Nine guys tied with the same record. It was a blast, at that time that was the most, and a odd number at that. Of course being the "Crazy American", who ever fought first would end up having to fight one more than the rest, so Hanakago volunteered me to be first. The outcome was history that day.

Happy Trails,

Cal

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