Kintamayama

September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

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9 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

If I recall correctly, one of the more recent and anomalous examples was Hattorizakura, who was asked to do 2 extra bouts in the same basho for people doing the Ryuden. Of course, in his case, it doesn't matter.

Sorry, not familiar with what "doing the Ryuden" means.  The only Ryuden I know is the shikona of Yuki Watanabe...

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5 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

Sorry, not familiar with what "doing the Ryuden" means.  The only Ryuden I know is the shikona of Yuki Watanabe...

Picked it up from either Herouth or the folks at Tachi-ai; doing the Ryuden means, like the namesake wrestler, coming back to do just one bout in the lowest divisions to avoid going banzuke-gai altogether, and therefore having to repeat maezumo.

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Several bouts today that ended with a streak of unnecessary roughness. Coincidence or are some rikishi less restrained, with the absence of spectators around the dohyo ?

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5 minutes ago, Gospodin said:

Several bouts today that ended with a streak of unnecessary roughness. Coincidence or are some rikishi less restrained, with the absence of spectators around the dohyo ?

There may be something to what you say.  However, I would contend that most wrestlers are more concerned about hurting ringside judges than hurting ringside fans, and the judges remain about as close to the ring as ever.  So wrestlers can't be completely unrestrained for fear that one of the shimpan will get injured.  That said, Hokutofuji's exit from the ring came pretty close to crushing the shimpan (Tanigawa) on the West side of the dohyo!

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14 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

I just saw ex-Terao in an interview. Some thing is definitely wrong with him. He looked very ill and spoke slowly with a lot of lapses. Very worrying.

Agreed.  He looked extremely pale, making the wart (?) on his upper lip more obvious.  He is the only commentator from the NSK who regularly appears wearing cheap plastic gloves.  In the ShinJuryo interview, he appeared to be sniffling a fair bit, which may indicate a mild flu (hopefully not COVID).

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Couple nice wins for my boy Kagayki, beating Takayasu yesterday. This could be a fun basho 11 or 12 win yusho with a big playoff with this bunch of guys, I'm here for it. 

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Terunofuji's win against Shodai, who was looking unbeatable to that point, was savage.

The sleeping giant may have awakened. 

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4 minutes ago, Kaninoyama said:

Terunofuji's win against Shodai, who was looking unbeatable to that point, was savage.

The sleeping giant may have awakened. 

Seriously. For all the Asanoyama hype, the big Mongolian just thrashed the “next Yokozuna” poster boy and made it look easy. If his legs stay healthy, look out.

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30 minutes ago, since_94 said:

Seriously. For all the Asanoyama hype, the big Mongolian just thrashed the “next Yokozuna” poster boy and made it look easy. If his legs stay healthy, look out.

Hmm. I don’t think his win against Asanoyama yesterday was particularly easy at all. Asa was in the driving seat from the start and threw it away. He had Terunofuji on the bales immediately and then when he pushed back tried a left-arm sukuinage. Only after escaping that did Terunofuji turn the tables. Not close to what I would deem a thrashing.

Unless I’m misunderstanding and you are actually referring to the “Next Ozeki” Shodai? Hard to tell the way you’ve written that there.

Edited by Eikokurai

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11 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

Hmm. I don’t think his win against Asanoyama yesterday was particularly easy at all. Asa was in the driving seat from the start and threw it away. He had Terunofuji on the bales immediately and then when he pushed back tried a left-arm sukuinage. Only after escaping that did Terunofuji turn the tables. Not close to what I would deem a thrashing.

Unless I’m misunderstanding and you are actually referring to the “Next Ozeki” Shodai? Hard to tell the way you’ve written that there.

An astute observation and I concede your point. Admittedly, I was getting my day 3 and 4 bouts confused. It’s early here and the coffee is just kicking in. It would be more apropos to describe the win over Asanoyama as convincing, whereas Shodai put up much less of a fight and the day 4 bout was much more one sided. In any case, I predict Terunofuji will reclaim his Ozeki rank before Shodai earns promotion and before Asanoyama gets a rope.

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7 minutes ago, since_94 said:

An astute observation and I concede your point. Admittedly, I was getting my day 3 and 4 bouts confused. It’s early here and the coffee is just kicking in. It would be more apropos to describe the win over Asanoyama as convincing, whereas Shodai put up much less of a fight and the day 4 bout was much more one sided. In any case, I predict Terunofuji will reclaim his Ozeki rank before Shodai earns promotion and before Asanoyama gets a rope.

I think Terunofuji can regain the rank but I’m not sure about your timeline. Shodai is already one basho into his run and likely will be two by the time this one is done, so next time around could be the clincher and he’s in the form needed to achieve it. Terunofuji on the other hand is only starting. His yusho win at M17 is unlikely to be counted and since he’s still just M1 now he will probably need a Y/JY this time for it to be counted too, or at the very least a convincing third place (say, 12 wins, if that remains possible). Thus Shodai could make Ozeki a basho or two sooner than Terunofuji.

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6 hours ago, ryafuji said:

I don't think Hakuho's ever started out 0-3. Asanoyama was probably releasing some built-up tension/frustration.

My perception is that after having his opponent at the bales on earlier days and being unable/unwilling to go over the cliff, he tried to load a throw and got beaten.  This time I think he said to himself "screw it, this guys going flying."

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12 hours ago, ryafuji said:

I don't think Hakuho's ever started out 0-3. Asanoyama was probably releasing some built-up tension/frustration.

He has in March 2005. What even is a Sekiwake Hakuho? :-P

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9 minutes ago, pricklypomegranate said:

He has in March 2005. What even is a Sekiwake Hakuho? :-P

That was the year when I made the fearless prediction that Hakuho would end up as a perennial Sekiwake.  (Sigh...)

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6 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

I think Terunofuji can regain the rank but I’m not sure about your timeline. Shodai is already one basho into his run and likely will be two by the time this one is done, so next time around could be the clincher and he’s in the form needed to achieve it. Terunofuji on the other hand is only starting. His yusho win at M17 is unlikely to be counted and since he’s still just M1 now he will probably need a Y/JY this time for it to be counted too, or at the very least a convincing third place (say, 12 wins, if that remains possible). Thus Shodai could make Ozeki a basho or two sooner than Terunofuji.

Drat! These accursed cogent and well-articulated arguments of yours are making mince of my ill-conceived scattershot prognostications! You make eminent sense, and I defer to your understanding of the nuances of promotion deliberations. I will leave my baseless prediction dangling out there anyway, for all to see, on the off chance it will come to pass, whereupon I shall trumpet myself as a clairvoyant. Not that I wish any misfortune on Shodai, mind you.

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Don't look now but Ichinojo is 4-1.

With those at the top feasting on one another, this basho seems primed for another Makuuchi bottom dweller to rise up and steal the yusho. 

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Also Izutsu on Abema hoped for a 13-0 by Onosho - the strict tachi-ai measures after a while again mess up many bouts, but Onosho went through with it on the 3rd try

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1 hour ago, since_94 said:

Drat! These accursed cogent and well-articulated arguments of yours are making mince of my ill-conceived scattershot prognostications! You make eminent sense, and I defer to your understanding of the nuances of promotion deliberations. I will leave my baseless prediction dangling out there anyway, for all to see, on the off chance it will come to pass, whereupon I shall trumpet myself as a clairvoyant. Not that I wish any misfortune on Shodai, mind you.

Well, you could be right. Shodai could completely screw it up while Terunofuji catches up. It isn’t such a wild prediction.

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Nice wins by Endo & Enho.  It was an en-en for both.  

I am betting Shodai will win it all.   I said it here.  :-)

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Onosho stands alone ... and not at the bottom this time. Quite the turnaround basho to basho.

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Today was a day of excellent sumo. Good stuff from Hoshoryu, Kotoshoho, Tochinoshin, Enho, Endo, Terunofuji, Shodai and the two ozeki.

In particular, the ozeki are finally looking like ozeki - overwhelming power and speed. Enho brought every trick in the book - henka, ashitori, and spins - to dispatch Ryuden. Takayasu was looking really good for most of the bout but Tochinoshin had it at the end with that really inspired kotenage while pivoting on his good leg. 

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As much as I want an Onosho zensho yusho, it's probably not going to happen (right?) - so the yusho race is still wide open. A three or four way playoff is going to be a spooky run-up to Halloween. The mythical 11-4 yusho might once again rear its head. 

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Every now and then, Endo pulls out amazing balance and staying power, resulting in a bout-of-the-basho contender. This was definitely one of those.

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Reviewing this page of the current thread, I see nary a mention to Takakeisho (except perhaps for Seiyashi's "the two ozeki").  

Most of the attention seems to be focused on Onosho, Shodai and Terunofuji.  Granted, there is good reason to be looking closely at these early yusho contenders.  But I am getting increasingly impressed by Takakeisho's performance this time around.  In July, it was pretty clear that he was still dealing with lingering injury issues as he struggled to get that vital KK.  But in this tournament, he seems to have been reborn (some thanks are probably due Yukina Chiba).  

Takakeisho's oshi-zumo game seems to be on point.  All four of his wins thus far have been oshidashi wins.  And what has impressed me is that his thrusts are hitting center mass (i.e., the middle of his opponents' chests) with new regularity.  He also seems to be taking advantage of his short statue, in that his opponents' thrusts are hitting him at neck and face level which don't have the most effective impact.  And despite having short arms, Takakeisho's thrusting power is lethal.  

As long as he can keep his opponents off his belt, he should be more or less unbeatable...

Edited by Amamaniac
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