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Yubiquitoyama

Toshiyori changes and such

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For those of us who cares about such things, here is a compilation of what has happened on the toshiyori front this year. The exact dates might be off with one or two days:

2003.01.20: Takanohana retires as rikishi and acquires a one-generation toshiyori as Takanohana, becoming the third after Taiho and Kitanoumi to receive one of that kind.

2003.01.22: Fujigane-oyakata (ex-Shikishima) changes toshiyori to Nishikijima, both of which are owned by retired ex-Ozeki Yutakayama who was rijicho before Kitanoumi.

2003.01.27: In anticipation of his retirement, Sakaigawa (former yokozuna Sadanoyama) switches toshiyori with Nakadachi-oyakata (former Komusubi Ryogoku). As a result, Nakadachi-beya is now known as Sakaigawa-beya and their rikishi, including Maegashira Iwakiyama and promising Makushita Houchiyama now belongs to Sakaigawa-beya.

2003.02.12: Ex-Owakamatsu who had borrowed the Asakayama-toshiyori from Kaio retires from oyakata at the age of 36.

2003.02.13: Jun-toshiyori Tomonohana borrows the Asakayama-stock from Kaio and can therefore continue as oyakata.

2003.02.14: Daizen acquires the Fujigane stock from ex-rijicho ex-Ozeki Yutakayama in anticipation of his retirement as rikishi.

2003.02.17: Retirement at the mandatory age of 65 for Nakadachi-oyakata, ex-yokozuna Sadanoyama and the second-to-last rijicho before Kitanoumi, as Dewanoumi and Sakaigawa. After his active career during which he won 6 yusho, he headed the powerful Dewanoumi-beya from 1968 to 1996 which included the promotion of Mienoumi (current Musashigawa) to Yokozuna.

2003.02.24: In anticipation of his retirement Kasugano-oyakata (ex-Yokozuna Tochinoumi) switches toshiyori with Takenawa-oyakata (ex-Sekiwake Tochinowaka). As a result, ex-Sekiwake Tochinowaka, 39 years old, becomes the 11th Kasugano and heya-owner of the powerful Kasugano-beya which currently houses 4 sekitori in Maegashiras Tochinonada, Kasuganishiki and Tochinohana plus Juryo Tochisakae. This was announced already a year ago and here is a translation from Japanese press by Joe Kuroda in February of 2002:

Former Tochinowaka to Take Over Kasugano Heya

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As a result, Nakadachi-beya is now known as Sakaigawa-beya and their rikishi, including Maegashira Iwakiyama and promising Makushita Houchiyama now belongs to Sakaigawa-beya.

No wonder I became distracted during Haru Basho when I noticed Iwakiyama's heya had become Sakaigawa. Thank you for the explanation and the message in general. Excellent stuff. (Thumbs up...)

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Yes, thank you for the summary.  This kind of information tends to be very scattered, so one page with all of it is valuable.

2003.02.12: Ex-Owakamatsu who had borrowed the Asakayama-toshiyori from Kaio retires from oyakata at the age of 36

Isn't this a young age to retire from oyakata?  Perhaps heading into other business?

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That's the problem when having a toshiyori on lone. It can be revoked at any moment by the owner (in this case Kaio)

Why would Kaio want it back now? I sure hope this doesn't mean he is planning his intai

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That's the problem when having a toshiyori on lone. It can be revoked at any moment by the owner (in this case Kaio)

Why would Kaio want it back now? I sure hope this doesn't mean he is planning his intai

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A quick question about one-generation toshiyori...

You were saying the third to get it... is Akebono-oyakata's considered different from these three?  Oh, and am I remembering right that Chiyonofuji was also offered a one-generation, but turned it down to become Kokonoe?

Thanks for the summary!  I am still and always a little confused about the dealings :D

Cheers

Zenjimoto

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A quick question about one-generation toshiyori...

You were saying the third to get it... is Akebono-oyakata's considered different from these three?

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Oh, and am I remembering right that Chiyonofuji was also offered a one-generation, but turned it down to become Kokonoe?

Chiyonofuji indeed was offered an ichidai toshiyori but he preferred a more time-honoured myoseki and therefore took first control of a regular kabu, viz. that of Jinmaku.

Consequently Kokonoe Oyakata (moto-yokozuna Kitanofuji, himself a makuuchi yusho winner ten times! ) and Jinmaku Oyakata swapped kabus and Chiyonofuji became the current Kokonoe.

Kitanofuji (then Jinmaku Oyakata) later left kyokai (in 1998, I think) in the aftermath of Takadagawa's successful rebellion against the establishment of Takasago Ichimon which raised him to riji and dropped Jinmaku down from rijikai.

Takadagawa still hasn't returned to Takasago Ichimon so I believe the animosity continues.

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(...) but the fact remains that he has no koenkai and no toshiyori, so in a worst case scenario he'd have to leave the Kyokai when his 5-year period is over.

By the time he's likely to receive Azumazeki kabu from his mentor but then again, who knows? I don't. :-D

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Chiyonofuji indeed was offered an ichidai toshiyori but he preferred a more time-honoured myoseki and therefore took first control of a regular kabu, viz. that of Jinmaku.

Chiyonofuji as always going with tradition  :-D

raised him to riji and dropped Jinmaku down from rijikai.

What are riji and rijikai?  I'm guessing it's the same root as rijicho?

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Thanks for the clarifications!  One more thing about the one-generations: I presume, one-generation means that when they retire, the toshiyori disappears in thin air, no?  In other words, it is not to be traded, borrowed or anything else - it just ends, no?

If that is so, in a way, a one-generation seems like a little worse of a deal than acquiring a regular one - for example, if Takanohana wants to pass it down to his son, he can't use the Takanohana-beya name any more, but would have to get another one from somewhere else?

Also, will the Futagoyama-toshiyori be traded to some one else, now that Takanohana doesn't need it, once his dad retires?

Cheers!

Zenjimoto, learning.

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So Takanohana cannot ever become the leading oyakata in

Futagoayama-beya?  I must be misunderstanding something.

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As I understood it, Futagoyama-beya will change its name to Takanohana-beya sooner or later. Nothing should prevent (correct me if I'm wrong) Takanohana to own Futagoyama-kabu, too... isn't it possible for one man to hold several kabu? Not ot use them all at once of course, he can borrow them etc, but still own them. In fact, he could borrow it to, let's say, Takanonami, who could be an assistant oyakata in Takanohana-beya... Futagoyama-oyakata. Wierd, huh? Of course, I'm hardly a kabu expert...

I don't think Futagoyama/Takanohana-beya will split, it's gotten quite small lately...

to Yoavo: heya takes its name from the haed oyakata, so any heya with Taka at its head will by deafult be Takanohana-beya.

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isn't it possible for one man to hold several kabu? Not ot use them all at once of course

I guess that was my real question(s), phrased much better by Manekineko  :-D

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Yes, a man can hold several kabus. I think former Tokitsukaze had two at some time.

Does anyone know who has Fujishima now? It used to be the name of Futagoyama-beya until Waka I & Taka I swapped their kabus in 1994 and the gigantic Futagoyama-beya was created through the merger of Wakanohana I's Futagoyama-beya and Takanohana I's Fujishima-beya.

Those who are new to ozumo... Care to guess how many of the forty makuuchi rikishi belonged to Futagoyama-beya in 1994?

Five? That would be quite a lot. Musashigawa has often five with Musashimaru, Musoyama, Dejima, Miyabiyama and Buyuzan.

Six? I can't think of an example of six right now.

Seven...? No...

Paint over below to see all them in Natsu '94.

O1E Takanonami (ex-Fujishima)

O1W Takanohana (ex-Fujishima)

O2W Wakanohana (ex-Fujishima)

M1W Takatoriki (ex-Fujishima)

M3E Akinoshima (ex-Fujishima)

M4E Misugisato (ex-Futagoyama)

M10E Wakashoyo (ex-Futagoyama)

M10W Takamisugi (ex-Futagoyama)

M15W Naminohana (ex-Futagoyama)

Toyonoumi used to be sekitori also for a long time. I guess there were real difficulties in arranging bouts when almost a fourth of the guys couldn't be scheduled against each other.

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No wonder people talked of Futagoyama-factor! :O

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I thought it was 10 at most, so it seems I was a bit off... Futagoyama really was a strong stable in any case then...

[ EDIT: No, I wasn't... 1993.05... ]

Anyway, what I was about to write was this:

To Zenjimoto: After the rule was rechanged, it's now once again possible to borrow toshiyori, so Takanohana might well end up in a situation not unlike the one his father has been in for some time (I think he owned three or even four toshiyori at most) where he uses one and lends out two others (Futagoyama and Fujishima stock) .

To Kotoseiya:

Yamahibiki is owned by Akinoshima, but no one has held it since Toyonoumi retired from oyakata in June of last year.

Takanohana acquired Fujishima a few years ago, after Wakanohana retired, and it would seem he is still the owner (although his father is almost certainly not without say in matters regarding that and other toshiyori he has owned) .

Otowayama, which is used by ex-Takamisugi, is supposedly owned by Takanonami, but since there are no Futagoyama-rikishi active that reasonably is out of a toshiyori, Takamisugi will probably be able to borrow Fujishima or Futagoyama-stock whenever Takanonami needs to use Otowayama.

Regarding the succession of Futagoyama-beya and Takanohana, the current Futagoyama becomes 65 in 2015, so there should be 3 possible scenarios:

1) Takanohana forms his own heya from scratch, and another oyakata takes over Futagoyama in 2015. Right now, Akinoshima or Takanonami seems the best picks for such an oyakata, although it's hard to say. I would guess Akinoshima if it comes down to a choice between the two of them.

2) Takanohana copies the ways of the earlier generation, forming his own heya from scratch within a few years, which then merges with Futagoyama-beya when his father retires, and thereafter will go by the name of Takanohana-beya.

3) Takanohana inherits the heya at or close before the retirement of his father and renames it to Takanohana-beya.

In the two latter alternatives, it's likely Takanohana will keep the Futagoyama-stock, so whenever he retires, the heya will once again become Futagoyama-beya. Of course, during that time, Futagoyama will be just another toshiyori, which Takanohana likely will let some oyakata borrow, not necessarily within Takanohana-beya.

I'm not sure which I believe will happen, but I kind of leans towards the second one. It could even be a similar case as the last generation, and the new heya becomes a really strong one with several sekitori. But again, that remains to be seen...

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I thought it was 10 at most, so it seems I was a bit off... Futagoyama really was a strong stable in any case then...

[ EDIT: No, I wasn't... 1993.05... ]

I remembered the number ten as well and was surprised to find out there were nine at most simultaneously. When Toyonoumi fell down to juryo, Naminohana came back to makuuchi to keep the number at nine in Natsu '94.

Indeed there were full ten guys from Futagoyama and Fujishima in Natsu '93 but since this was before the merger (February 1st, 1994), it doesn't count. :-)

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I remembered the number ten as well and was surprised to find out there were nine at most simultaneously. When Toyonoumi fell down to juryo, Naminohana came back to makuuchi to keep the number at nine in Natsu '94.

Indeed there were full ten guys from Futagoyama and Fujishima in Natsu '93 but since this was before the merger (February 1st, 1994), it doesn't count. :-)

??? Surely the merger was before Haru 1993, when the old Futagoyama turned 65 in March 1993?

:-)

EDIT: Indeed the old Futagoyama switched to Fujishima February 1993 so I assume your data is simply one year off, since I don't think there was any transition-time between the two oyakatas.

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EDIT: Indeed the old Futagoyama switched to Fujishima February 1993 so I assume your data is simply one year off, since I don't think there was any transition-time between the two oyakatas.

First I had only my memory to back up this date, February 1st, 1994. Then I checked out the SML archive, viz. this message. Of course, there's no way of denying my memory could very well be based on this very message and if it's incorrect, so is my memory about the event.

I will study this further...

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EDIT: Indeed the old Futagoyama switched to Fujishima February 1993 so I assume your data is simply one year off, since I don't think there was any transition-time between the two oyakatas.

First I had only my memory to back up this date, February 1st, 1994. Then I checked out the SML archive, viz. this message. Of course, there's no way of denying my memory could very well be based on this very message and if it's incorrect, so is my memory about the event.

I will study this further...

Ok. Well, nothing suggests Wakanohana-1 DID NOT retire at 65 and he is born March 16 1928, which a number of sites can confirm (since he was a yokozuna; to locate birthdates of Juryo rikishi is a whole other issue :-) ). Takayama Kazuhisas site, that lists all Makunouchi rikishi also puts 1993.03 as the retirement month of him. Plus, I found another site that independently puts the toshiyori exchange between Fujishima and Futagoyama-oyakata as February 1993 (well, rather Heisei(5.2)) . So I'm willing to bet Masumi Abe simply remembered wrong when making that post and the correct date should be February 1st 1993. But anyone out there with a Sumo World or so maybe could confirm? I have no magazines from the period between Feb 1993 and Jan 1994, I'm afraid.

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