Kintamayama

This IS the July 2020 Basho thread!! Spoilers!!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Benevolance said:

I'm so on-the-fence about Mitakeumi. He posts decent numbers each tournament, but his wins tend to congregate at the beginning of the basho when his schedule is easiest. Yet, he's nabbed two yusho and seems capable of wrestling with the big boys in flashes. Is he good? Is he great? Will he overtake Goeidou's perma-sekiwake record? I strongly suspect the answer is yes to all three questions. 

As much as I would like to give you a "like" for your insightful assessment of the situation (ah, what the heck), that would refute my true hopes that Mitakeumi will secure promotion to Ozeki, and soon.  

What I like about Mitakeumi is that he doesn't seem to be injury prone, that he's proven that he can win the Top Division yusho twice (i.e., one more time than Goeido), and that he seems to be performing well despite not being able to benefit from degeiko with Tochinoshin & Co. at Kasugao Stable for the last few months.  

Goeido's "perm-sekiwake record" came at a time with a more robust sanyaku banzuke.  These days, things at the top seem a little more open.

Edited by Amamaniac
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32 minutes ago, Benihana said:

But back then he was weakened from injury and illness.

That is certainly true, but you'd think he would have developed some aversion to it in that time. We'll see how he does against some beefier competition getting that grip, as he does seem primed to climb the rankings regardless.

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3 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

Not *really* - Tokushoryu was dead last on the banzuke, Terunofuji isn't.

OK, you win. 

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Posted (edited)

Some jabbering Day 4:

Takanoshou, first musubi no ichiban, against Hakuhou: "I've never felt this kind of tension before. I was able to move forward, so I have no regrets.."

Daieishou, getting Asanoyama to the dohyo-edge, but getting twisted around and losing: "The content wasn't bad, but I couldn't finish it off at the dohyo's edge.."

Myougiryuu, beating same aged Ikioi (33) and looking good, having a 4-0 start for the first time since March 2016: "I was attacking all the way so that was good. I'd like to continue in this manner."

Enhou, moving to the right at the dohyo edge, turning the tables on Aoiyama who is 100 kilos heavier than him. He is 2-2 now, but still not happy with his performance thus far: "I am not doing it right. The fact we skipped one basho may be the cause.."

Terunofuji, 4 straight wins after his return to Makuuchi: "All I can do is give it my all. Even if I can't do that, I'm not about to give up!"

Kotoshouhou, the rookie with a 4-0 record, facing ex-Ozeki Takayasu, who trained against him a few months ago: "I did my best not to be conscious of it. We are at the same position at present so I told myself I had to go out there feeling I can win and I'm happy I did. I was happy to get my first-ever kensho. I'll think about how to spend the money.."

Asanoyama, almost losing today. "It was bad sumo today. I was in too much of a hurry at the end but managed to sidestep with all my might and that was good.. I am nervous when I mount the dohyo. The crowds' applause gives me strength and I want to live up to their expectations!"

Hakuhou, facing Takanoshou for the first time and winning: "He felt heavy and strong. The fact that I moved well at the end is due to my experience, I guess. I think so.. I did train against him in the past. He has a hard body- I love facing hard-bodied opponents."

Mitakeumi now 4-0, beating Yutakayama: "Today was the best sumo I did since day 1. I'm able to fight calmly-my body is moving well , so I'm taking it one day at a time.."

Edited by Kintamayama
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5 hours ago, RabidJohn said:

That Mitoryu hairpull was his other hand slipping and catching the top knot after he'd already won. Bout over - no foul.

I don't think either Hakuho or Asanoyama looked off it today, quite the contrary.

Hakuho was up against someone he hadn't met before in a regulation bout, nor has he had the opportunity to check out the new joi in keiko this time. Takanosho isn't M2 for nothing. He gave it his best shot and managed to move the yokozuna backwards, which is something he can be moderately pleased about. Hakuho reacted with the correct counter - like he would.

Asanoyama, on the other hand, was up against someone with a winning record over him, so besides all the tsuppari, harite and nodowa he had to withstand he also had to overcome that pyschological disadvantage before coming up with the correct counter - which he did.

Good sumo from both IMO.

Asanoyama had won the previous three meetings against that aite, now four.  He had no 'psychological disadvantage' to overcome...

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24 minutes ago, Kintamayama said:

Some jabbering:

How about some jibbering next time? ;-)

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Posted (edited)

Do some of you genuinely think Takakeisho is going to lose his Ozeki rank? He’s only kadoban, not an Ozekiwake. He needs just eight wins and he’s already got three after four days. I know his schedule gets a little tougher moving forward but the sanyaku aren’t that much of an obstacle at the moment. I don’t see him struggling to get five more over the remaining 11 days at all.

Edited by Eikokurai
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1 hour ago, Yangnomazuma said:

Asanoyama had won the previous three meetings against that aite, now four.  He had no 'psychological disadvantage' to overcome...

I'll grant that he may be gaining in confidence against Daieisho, but he went in at 4-7 and he's still only 5-7. If you want to believe the psychology of competition has no effect on results, you're free to do so. I see Moti quoting Asanoyama as being nervous when he entered the ring, and coming away believing he'd done 'bad sumo', and that tells me otherwise. 

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4 minutes ago, RabidJohn said:

I'll grant that he may be gaining in confidence against Daieisho, but he went in at 4-7 and he's still only 5-7. If you want to believe the psychology of competition has no effect on results, you're free to do so. I see Moti quoting Asanoyama as being nervous when he entered the ring, and coming away believing he'd done 'bad sumo', and that tells me otherwise. 

I don’t read what Yangnomazuma wrote as them saying psychology has no effect, only that in this particular case Asanoyama may have already overcome any concerns he may have had about facing that particular opponent. It’s been almost a year since he last lost to Daieisho and since then he’s become an Ozeki. Hard to imagine he fears Daieisho in quite the same way he may once have. He meets him as his senior, early in the basho when he’s genki and with the current form record in his favour. Those nerves he speaks of seem to be in general terms, not Daieisho specific, and the sort of thing he often says in his interviews because he seems a self-deprecating sort of chap.

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Hiro Morita 2-minute video update through day 4..m

 

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8 minutes ago, Gaijingai said:

Hiro Morita 2-minute video update through day 4..m

 

My before pandemic/after pandemic headshots look similar to yours ...

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10 hours ago, Joaoiyama said:

Overall this basho is looking great, i was expecting to see a terrible basho where the rikishi weren't in shape at all but it seems like the rest did them good, i'm quite happy.

Sumo is really bad about giving folks the space to heal from injuries, so I've been expecting the full rest from cancelling one basho plus both jungyo series in between, plus the post-Hatsu jungyo break, to have a very good effect on a lot of rikishi.

I wonder if part of Enho's and Ishiura's success has been being young, healthy, and able to capitalize on folks who are hurt and tired, and that the absence of that dynamic is causing them to struggle a bit.

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27 minutes ago, Sue said:

I wonder if part of Enho's and Ishiura's success has been being young, healthy, and able to capitalize on folks who are hurt and tired, and that the absence of that dynamic is causing them to struggle a bit.

Interesting theory. We do often consider how injuries impact the rikishi carrying them without thinking about how injuries benefit the healthier ones around them. While I don’t think Enho and Ishiura have somehow fluked their way to Makuuchi by lucking out against ailing aite all the way, it may have helped them on occasion and sometimes an extra win or two makes a world of difference to rankings.

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Posted (edited)

They aren't doing any worse than I'd expect them to be doing in general at those ranks, though the extra rest could certainly help some rikishi more than others.

 

Edited by Katooshu

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7 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

As much as I would like to give you a "like" for your insightful assessment of the situation (ah, what the heck), that would refute my true hopes that Mitakeumi will secure promotion to Ozeki, and soon.  

I have been hoping for a while but Mitakeumi keeps finding ways to kill his Ozeki run.  Notably, whether he starts as S1 or M3, he seems to finish weak.   Stamina issue?  Losing focus as the basho goes on?  I don't know but if he can fix his sometimes disappearing act in the second half of the basho, I think he can get to Ozeki.   My 2 cents.

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Posted (edited)

Mitakeumi has been my favorite since I started watching sumo in 2017 and the one thing it seems to me holding him back from the elite consistency you need to be a Y/O is the lack of yotsu sumo. The commentators seem to think he's come a long way in this department, but I don't see it.

While completey different rikishi, this is what makes Asaonyama's run of consistency possible. When he gets in a belt battle with a lesser rikishi, you feel like it's an inevitable win for him. With Mitakeumi, I feel like it's 50-50 with a lesser rikishi and significantly less when you get to the sanyaku opponents. I also think it's a lazy narrative to blame it on training, as I think body type plays a factor with Mitakeumi being on the shorter side and not as long of limbs as his peers at his level, denying him of natural leverage to be an elite belt worker. 

With any oshi sumo to be a regular yusho contender, you need perfect constant timing, reaction, and balance to go along with pushing strength, which Mitakeumi is in the upper echelon in these areas. The problem is any minimal loss in focus can lead to a mistake that leads to an upset loss, which the margain for error on an ozeki run in razor thin. These mistakes are easily overcome for yotsu workers, as your balance and leverage is preserved and can be counteracted by the strength of your grip.

The one area that Mitakeumi really stepped up in his two yusho wins was not yotsu sumo, but reactive sumo Kakuryu style. Where he had in both yusho a couple wins where he was on the brink but had perfect focus, timing, and reaction for a side step manuever to overcome a battle up against the tawara. Just look at his wins in Aki 2019 over Daieisho, Abi, and Tamawashi... all competitors that are lower ranked, but gave him some trouble that he overcame from reactive sumo. This basho's Day 3 win over Onosho was another example of that. If he can do that on a more consistent basis and turn even just 1 or 2 losses per tournament into a win, you will be looking at an Ozeki.

Reactive sumo often gets frowned upon because it is not dominant and powerful looking, but even the best excel at it to overcome moments of weakness.

All just my opinion of course :)

Edited by Tiger Tanaka
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18 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

Top Division gyoji, Kimura Hisanosuke was MIA today.  Not sure what's up with him.

His brother Kyokudozan told on Abema that Hisanosuke came down with a fever, feared it to be the thing, had a PCR test and this morning got the result: negative - safe.

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24 minutes ago, Akinomaki said:

His brother Kyokudozan told on Abema that Hisanosuke came down with a fever, feared it to be the thing, had a PCR test and this morning got the result: negative - safe.

Whew!  

 

Terunofuji ran into motivated Takayasu today.  He looks to be strong in losing.  Or, Takayasu is nowhere near where he used to be.  It is sad to see all these fallen Ozekis (4!) battling in lower Makuuchi.  

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Wakatakakage has now faced opponents from Sadogatake for five straight days, losing his first three, but winning the last two. "Seeing the day 5 torikumi, I was surprised.." he said, surprised.

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On 22/07/2020 at 08:22, Akinomaki said:
On 22/07/2020 at 07:34, robnplunder said:

Anyone know how the ticket sales is going?  

Plenty of seats still available, day 1 had about 2000 of 2500 sold, the next days much less

1&o found an external site  that sells medium grade tickets for the day for less than the tickets for the day would cost (I thought it would be TicketToday, but one would have to look in the morning to find out) - looks like the NSK is trying desperately to get more applauding spectators in

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That was some nice sumo from Asanoyama. I hope he can stay healthy. He looks like the real deal. (Yushowinner...)

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Posted (edited)

Asanoyama v Kiribayama is definitely the bout of the basho so far for me- I actually applauded along with the crowd in the end.

It's lovely to see Kiribayama producing such good spectacle at a high rank, I was disappointed to see him stick in makushita for a while after his stellar start to his career. 

Edited by Atenzan
Accidental dadaism
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3 minutes ago, Atenzan said:

It's lovely to see Asanoyama v Kiribayama is definitely the bout of the basho so far for me- I actually applauded along with the crowd in the end. It's lovely to see Kiribayama producing such good spectacle at a high rank, I was disappointed to see him stick in makushita for a while after his stellar start to his career. 

Hmm, somehow your post resembles your avatar pic. B-)

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