Kintamayama

Corona and sumo

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The Sumo association and community seem to have done very well with health control in a challenging time.  To look at the spectators, it seems everyone is behaving responsibly.  It is strange, I thought, a couple of times this basho when the cameras, scanning the crowd, zeroed in on folks (men) with their masks pulled down.
Whenever we (in the USA) get the pandemic under control enough to be eligible to travel to Japan, I would certainly attend the basho although the alcohol ban is a great sacrifice.  Sumo and nihonshu is a lovely pairing.
But I digress.  While the power water and power paper rituals have been distilled into gestures to avoid contaminating the mouth of the rikishi, many rikishi still take a taste of salt before the bout.  While it is undoubtedly a sensory stimulation, it is introducing a substance into the mouth that has been pawed by the preceding rikishi.  I would guess that between a quarter and half of the wrestlers engage in this activity.  Is it dangerous?  Should someone be cautioning the rikishi from engaging in the practice?

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8 minutes ago, Obana said:

The Sumo association and community seem to have done very well with health control in a challenging time.  To look at the spectators, it seems everyone is behaving responsibly.  It is strange, I thought, a couple of times this basho when the cameras, scanning the crowd, zeroed in on folks (men) with their masks pulled down.
Whenever we (in the USA) get the pandemic under control enough to be eligible to travel to Japan, I would certainly attend the basho although the alcohol ban is a great sacrifice.  Sumo and nihonshu is a lovely pairing.
But I digress.  While the power water and power paper rituals have been distilled into gestures to avoid contaminating the mouth of the rikishi, many rikishi still take a taste of salt before the bout.  While it is undoubtedly a sensory stimulation, it is introducing a substance into the mouth that has been pawed by the preceding rikishi.  I would guess that between a quarter and half of the wrestlers engage in this activity.  Is it dangerous?  Should someone be cautioning the rikishi from engaging in the practice?

The good news is that before the basho, the rikishi are under mini-lockdowns in the heya/at home and rigorously tested, so the rikishi themselves are almost guaranteed to be clear. In any case, they share largely the same "backstage" areas in the Kokugikan, and have fairly close contact to the preceding/subsequent wrestler during the ritual itself anyway,  so the salt is no more a danger to them than being skin to skin. 

The bigger worry is with, as you mentioned, some laxity on the part of the spectators, especially at a time when Tokyo is experiencing an increase in cases. There is some pressure on the NSK to pull off successful sporting events because that is seen as an organisational prelude to the Olympics, and that really needs everything to go right; complacency is going to be quite ugly for everyone involved.

Edited by Seiyashi
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9 minutes ago, Obana said:

The Sumo association and community seem to have done very well with health control in a challenging time.  To look at the spectators, it seems everyone is behaving responsibly.  It is strange, I thought, a couple of times this basho when the cameras, scanning the crowd, zeroed in on folks (men) with their masks pulled down.
Whenever we (in the USA) get the pandemic under control enough to be eligible to travel to Japan, I would certainly attend the basho although the alcohol ban is a great sacrifice.  Sumo and nihonshu is a lovely pairing.
But I digress.  While the power water and power paper rituals have been distilled into gestures to avoid contaminating the mouth of the rikishi, many rikishi still take a taste of salt before the bout.  While it is undoubtedly a sensory stimulation, it is introducing a substance into the mouth that has been pawed by the preceding rikishi.  I would guess that between a quarter and half of the wrestlers engage in this activity.  Is it dangerous?  Should someone be cautioning the rikishi from engaging in the practice?

I'm not a microbiologist, but the virus is amazingly fragile despite its virulence. I don't think many bacteria or viruses will live long on a pure salt surface, thus the reason it's used so extensively as a preservative. 

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1 hour ago, Kaminariyuki said:

I'm not a microbiologist, but the virus is amazingly fragile despite its virulence. I don't think many bacteria or viruses will live long on a pure salt surface, thus the reason it's used so extensively as a preservative. 

I know it's not a virus, but seeing the yobidashi throw salt on the blood during the Chiyonokuni match two days ago and seeing it instantly dissolve and disappear changed my life. (Laughing...)

Edited by pricklypomegranate
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On 18/11/2020 at 13:12, pricklypomegranate said:

I know it's not a virus, but seeing the yobidashi throw salt on the blood during the Chiyonokuni match two days ago and seeing it instantly dissolve and disappear changed my life. (Laughing...)

Something something magic salt.

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1 hour ago, Halian said:
On 19/11/2020 at 02:12, pricklypomegranate said:

I know it's not a virus, but seeing the yobidashi throw salt on the blood during the Chiyonokuni match two days ago and seeing it instantly dissolve and disappear changed my life. (Laughing...)

Something something magic salt.

Salt apparently lifts blood stains out of fabric really well. I'm much more interested in the chemistry of it, but I can't quite find anything precisely on how it works. A possible analogue is the use of irritant salts in sclerotherapy to flush and collapse varicose/spider veins - some sources suggest that clotting is the reason behind the colour change.

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1 hour ago, Seiyashi said:

Salt apparently lifts blood stains out of fabric really well. I'm much more interested in the chemistry of it, but I can't quite find anything precisely on how it works. A possible analogue is the use of irritant salts in sclerotherapy to flush and collapse varicose/spider veins - some sources suggest that clotting is the reason behind the colour change.

Also Coke, but I doubt you’ll see chikara-cola anytime soon ;)

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1 minute ago, Halian said:

Also Coke, but I doubt you’ll see chikara-cola anytime soon ;)

+1. (Iamgoingoff-topic...), but Coke probably does that with the acid action from phosphoric and carbonic acids, and on most things (other than a dohyo), the Coke would just stain worse than what you're trying to lift anyway. I think it's quite a different mechanism of action from salt, which usually acts as an anti-bacterial agent by dessicating like mad. I'm just hypothesising here (happy to be corrected by any biochemists), but salt water probably ruptures red blood cells by virtue of osmosis (which way is anyone's guess), which exposes the hemoglobin to degradation, hence vanishing the red colour of blood.

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7 hours ago, Halian said:

Also Coke

Maybe that’s what the white powder they throw really is.

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Number of spectators allowed for January will be 5300.Tamariseki will be filled by every fourth person and some tickets will be sold to the public (dont hold your breath, Mr. Public..} Tickets will also be sold at the Kkan  itself, based on availability. 

Edited by Kintamayama
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10 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Maybe that’s what the white powder they throw really is.

LOL. Not coke, Coke.

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Now more than two thousands new cases a day. Will the January basho be canceled? It seems vaccinations will not be available to the public until March.

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12 hours ago, Dapeng said:

Now more than two thousands new cases a day. Will the January basho be canceled? It seems vaccinations will not be available to the public until March.

I'd bet against it getting canceled unless there is an outbreak among rikishi, but making it a spectator-free event may be put back on the table if the situation continues to decline in Tokyo. 

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14 hours ago, Kaninoyama said:

I'd bet against it getting canceled unless there is an outbreak among rikishi, but making it a spectator-free event may be put back on the table if the situation continues to decline in Tokyo. 

It seems it's getting worse and worse everywhere ...... 

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3 hours ago, Dapeng said:

It seems it's getting worse and worse everywhere ...... 

One thing you can count on: there will never be a decrease in total cases.

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What is the situation in Japan regarding vaccines? I'm assuming the rikishi won't have access before the January basho, but perhaps March?

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On 04/12/2020 at 15:46, Marcus33 said:

What is the situation in Japan regarding vaccines? I'm assuming the rikishi won't have access before the January basho, but perhaps March?

I highly doubt they will be vaccinated by March.  There aren't going to be enough of these vaccines for the mass until late spring according to the tea leaves I have been reading.  

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The NSK announced today that 3 rikishi have been infected, from the same heya, makushita or below, so no names. Yesterday they complained of fever and coughed and had a positive PCR test. Hospital treatment is planned, but they are not severe cases so far.

All heya connected persons are tested now. Shibatayama: "We'll have to wait and see'': The NSK waits for the instructions from the health care center.

https://www.daily.co.jp/general/2020/12/10/0013928490.shtml

Edited by Akinomaki
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On 10/12/2020 at 16:25, Akinomaki said:

The NSK announced today that 3 rikishi have been infected, from the same heya, makushita or below, so no names. Yesterday they complained of fever and coughed and had a positive PCR test. Hospital treatment is planned, but they are not severe cases so far.

All heya connected persons are tested now. Shibatayama: "We'll have to wait and see'': The NSK waits for the instructions from the health care center.

https://www.daily.co.jp/general/2020/12/10/0013928490.shtml

The outbreak is at Tatsunami-beya. Akua is the only sekitori confirmed to be infected so far - no word on Meisei and Hoshoryu.

立浪部屋で計10人が新型コロナに感染 角界では3例目の集団感染 : スポーツ報知 (hochi.news)

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On 05/12/2020 at 22:15, robnplunder said:

I highly doubt they will be vaccinated by March.  There aren't going to be enough of these vaccines for the mass until late spring according to the tea leaves I have been reading.  

That could easily be the deal in Japan. In the USofA, I suspect that celebrities, including sports teams, will somehow get early vaccinations, maybe right behind the elderly/sensitive groups and health care workers.

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This is most unfortunate news. I wish Akua and all the other rikishi and staff affected a speedy and complete recovery 

 

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20 minutes ago, since_94 said:

This is most unfortunate news. I wish Akua and all the other rikishi and staff affected a speedy and complete recovery 

 

I expect he and the others will get the "kosho-lite" treatment for Hatsu, right?

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5 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

I expect he and the others will get the "kosho-lite" treatment for Hatsu, right?

It was hardly kosho lite, it was kosho plus since it kicked in for the injured basho and not the next. But that depends if they are still infectious during the basho period. It wasn't necessary during the Takadagawa outbreak because the basho was well after everyone had recovered. 

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5 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

I expect he and the others will get the "kosho-lite" treatment for Hatsu, right?

The treatment of the entire heya excluded from competition was appropriate given that none of them individually posed a known risk to other rikishi; they simply were in the range of being possible carriers during the tournament that were not able to be cleared by the time the tournament started, so it was safer and more consistent for everyone involved that all those potentially exposed not participate and maintain their rank.  For those that actually have the virus, the reasoning is a bit different, because it would be the same as with any contagious disease a rikishi may be suffering from that doctors may not allow that particular person to participate because they are a known current risk, and as such might not get any lenient treatment.  However, comparing the two situations makes it seem really assholish, given how contagious this thing is, to force them to not participate and then dock their rank.  I would hope that they might then look at similar situations with an eye on the same factors.

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Just remembered this is the heya that Hanakaze belongs to. Hopefully he is not one of the infected, given his age he is definitely susceptible to the virus. Wishing those in the heya well during this time.

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