Kaninoyama

Goeido to Retire

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1 hour ago, Asashosakari said:

(Not that that's going to persuade anyone who is unable to watch sumo through anything but the yaocho lens... Or maybe it's just nostalgia for former glory days when that viewpoint hadn't descended into self-parody yet.)

Also known as the Wesemann school of sumo.

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10-4 Kisenosato beat 7-7 Goeido on senshuraku in Aki 2015.  Terunofuji already had 12 wins, so the yusho was not potentially up for grabs.  

Goeido lost his last 3 matches in Nagoya 2017 to finish 7-8.  While the first two losses were to Yokozuna in the Yusho race, the last was against 8-6 Ozeki Takayasu.

Do you need any more evidence to see OSBC is dead and gone?

Perhaps some of his 8th wins in other tournaments were yaocho, but it's clear that they (the Ozeki) definitely stayed well away from it when it was obvious who really needed the win more, on at least those two occasions.

I suppose you can counter with "Goeido gave those guys the wins so he could get them back for his zensho next tournament".  Sure, whatever.

Edited by Gurowake

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Well, that's another thing. I don't remember much discussion about the OBSC being outright yaocho. Wasn't it always presumed to be more like a kind of tacit understanding among participants?

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The majority of OBSC was simply a situation in which one ozeki needed a win and the other did not.  The one who did not saw no need to go all out and risk an injury.  One had an adrenalin rush and the other didn't.  Across the board, there are a lot of gimme matches in the final two days which is when the 2 ozekis normally meet. One more win or one more loss usually does not make much of a difference. From a career standpoint, there are only three major concerns for most sekitori for each basho - 10 or more wins, 10 or more losses and injury.  Anything else is really of no long term consequence.  For ozekis, it is even simpler - yusho, 8 wins or 8 losses and injury. 

Edited by Asojima
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Goeido's advance from his 2007 entry to the makuuchi division.

 

 

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There is a vast gray zone between "everyone is gachinko" and "noone is gachinko" you guys know...

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(Ex-)Goeido as former ozeki from the start gets the salary as i-in: 1.032 million yen per month instead of 808 000yen the ordinary starters get as plain toshiyori. The retirement money are the 10 million yen an ozeki gets as 養老金  youroukin, and 22.85 million yen for continuous service as sekitori, 勤続金 kinzoku-kasan-kin - plus the not mentioned money from his kensho the NSK has kept for him (minus that used for his taxes) - and the undisclosed sum the rikishi-kai decides to give him as merit bonus. http://www.daily.co.jp/general/2020/01/30/0013073714.shtml

He will be the first to get the citizen's honor award of his hometown Neyagawa-city. http://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/202001280000511.html

I have collected most of the pics the papers had posted, but after the day 15 flood, I was fed up with pics for a while - I hope I get hungry again till the next basho starts.

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19 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

(Ex-)Goeido as former ozeki from the start gets the salary as i-in: 1.032 million yen per month instead of 808 000yen the ordinary starters get as plain toshiyori. The retirement money are the 10 million yen an ozeki gets as 養老金  youroukin, and 22.85 million yen for continuous service as sekitori, 勤続金 kinzoku-kasan-kin - plus the not mentioned money from his kensho the NSK has kept for him (minus that used for his taxes) - and the undisclosed sum the rikishi-kai decides to give him as merit bonus. http://www.daily.co.jp/general/2020/01/30/0013073714.shtml

He will be the first to get the citizen's honor award of his hometown Neyagawa-city. http://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/202001280000511.html

I have collected most of the pics the papers had posted, but after the day 15 flood, I was fed up with pics for a while - I hope I get hungry again till the next basho starts.

I'll bet Goeido was the top vote-getter in Sanspo's "rikishi least likely to blow his retirement money on a Maserati and pimp clothes".

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This might be a dumb question, and with enough Googling effort I could probably find an answer, but if retiring as Ozeki grants a bigger financial benefit than retiring further down the ranks, why don’t we see more Ozeki do it when it is pretty clear they will struggle to ever get the rank back? Does that retirement salary only last a short time and the option of fighting as a rank and filer for a while evens out the financial difference? Or are there other things at play here?

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16 minutes ago, Katsunorifuji said:

This might be a dumb question, and with enough Googling effort I could probably find an answer, but if retiring as Ozeki grants a bigger financial benefit than retiring further down the ranks, why don’t we see more Ozeki do it when it is pretty clear they will struggle to ever get the rank back? Does that retirement salary only last a short time and the option of fighting as a rank and filer for a while evens out the financial difference? Or are there other things at play here?

The last rank you had before retiring doesn't matter in the least, it's your highest rank that matters. Everyone who makes it to ozeki, whether they retire while still ozeki or drop to juryo or even further, is treated as an ozeki on retirement. They're still referred to as "former ozeki (shikona)" and given the appropriate retirement benefits of a former ozeki.

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38 minutes ago, fwuzzle23 said:

The last rank you had before retiring doesn't matter in the least, it's your highest rank that matters. Everyone who makes it to ozeki, whether they retire while still ozeki or drop to juryo or even further, is treated as an ozeki on retirement. They're still referred to as "former ozeki (shikona)" and given the appropriate retirement benefits of a former ozeki.

Thanks, that makes sense and explains a lot. 

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41 minutes ago, Katsunorifuji said:

Does that retirement salary only last a short time and the option of fighting as a rank and filer for a while evens out the financial difference?

It's certainly the case that continuing to compete is financially worthwhile as such - for instance, compared to the monthly salary of 1.032 million yen that Goeido will now receive as oyakata*, Kotoshogiku is still making 1.4 million per month as maegashira (plus bonus payments, in his case about 30% on top of that base amount). But yeah, as fwuzzle23's comment stated, the timing of the actual retirement makes no difference as to the benefits that can be obtained from that. IMHO though, the money probably doesn't make that much of a difference either way - some guys have the will and desire to compete to the bitter end, while others just feel they're physically done and are happy to move on to the next phase of their sumo career in coaching.

It will often be different for rikishi who already know they're not going to stay in the Kyokai and will try to make the paychecks come in for as long as possible; retirements by them are quite rare while they still have room to spare on the banzuke before the unsalaried ranks beckon.
 

* Which is what the vast majority of oyakata get in salary - guys who didn't make it to ozeki start with lower amounts if they manage to remain in the Association, but they get there within about 5 years as well. On the flipside, oyakata who are elected or selected for executive positions will earn more than that.

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I have some extra time now that I'm stuck at home so I cut together a bunch of Kintamayama videos to make a Goeido Kubinage highlight reel.
 

Gonna miss the champion of Kubinage

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Awesome! It worked against everyone, even a guy with no neck (Laughing...)

According to the numbers in sumodb, his kubinage frequency is 13x that of other rikishi, on average... (Eek...)

Somehow Goeido didn't score a kubinage win within 2017-2019, during which he got defeated by kubinage for the only time in his career (by Chiyosoma).

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