Asashosakari

Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Aki 2019

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Juryo yusho race:

9-2 J11e Kotonowaka, J12w Ikioi

8-3 ---

7-4 J2e Takanosho, J5e Daishomaru, J13w Kizakiumi, J14w Kaisho

And so, just two days removed from having half the division in contention, it looks like this has become a pure two-horse race. Kotonowaka sent sole pursuer Daishomaru to two wins off the pace, and Ikioi continued his resurgence against Tobizaru to keep in touch with the rookie. Of course a lot can still happen and the co-leaders might well both pick up two more losses along the way, but I'm not so sure anyone in the 7-4 group will be able to post the required four straight wins to take advantage of it if it does happen.

In any case, for Day 12 it's now Ikioi who gets to face Daishomaru, while Kotonowaka gets 6-5 Kyokutaisei. 


Lower division yusho races (Day 11 results):

5-1 Ms7w Chiyootori (Kokonoe)
6-0 Ms27e Terunofuji (Isegahama)
6-0 Ms46w Chiyonokuni (Kokonoe)

5-1 Sd1w Oazuma (Tamanoi)
6-0 Sd6e Tsushida (Tokitsukaze)
5-1 Sd36w Tsushimanada (Sakaigawa)
6-0 Sd46w Sadanohikari (Sakaigawa)
5-1 Sd63e Hitenryu (Tatsunami)
5-1 Sd75e Suzuki (Fujishima)
6-0 Sd96w Fujinowaka (Fujishima)

5-1 Jd15w Sakurai (Naruto)
6-0 Jd16e Motobayashi (Naruto)
6-0 Jd48w Sadanohana (Sakaigawa)
5-1 Jd72w Tomiyutaka (Tokitsukaze)
5-1 Jd92w Higonoryu (Kise)
6-0 Jd98w Aomihama (Dewanoumi)

5-1 Jk9e Mimori (Irumagawa)
6-0 Jk27e Murata (Takasago)
6-0 Jk30e Omura (Michinoku)

The most anticipated yusho race battle was also the by far most competitive one, with Terunofuji already moved back to the tawara by Chiyootori before he employed his bulk to prevent the forceout, rallied, and eventually secured a deep enough position to move Chiyootori back and down. He'll now get to contest the makushita yusho on Day 13 against Chiyonokuni whose thrusting attack looked very much like the Chiyonokuni of old, and which was easily sufficient to move Oazuma back and out of the dohyo.

All in all we entered this round with no less than four possibilities for same-stable playoffs, of which exactly zero managed to stay intact. Sakaigawa's smallish Tsushimanada engaged in some frantic thrusting as he usually does, but got the tables turned on him by Tsushida in short order. Stablemate Sadanohikari did better, quickly flinging down Suzuki with uwatenage after they'd entered yotsu off the tachiai. That broke up the Fujishima duo, whose other part Fujinowaka managed to score a rather easy oshidashi victory over veteran Hitenryu.

Sadanohana-Sakurai in jonidan was the other reasonably close contest, in which some back and forth action eventually led to Sadanohana gaining the upper hand and then ending it soon after. So, no Naruto playoff either, but last basho's jonokuchi champion Motobayashi did maintain his shot at doing the double; a brief advance off the tachiai by Tomiyutaka was quickly smothered and turned into Motobayashi's yorikiri victory. Much earlier in the division we saw Aomihama succeed as he was fast out of the blocks and easily yorikiried veteran low-ranker Higonoryu.

And down in jonokuchi both Murata and Omura scored very easy oshidashi wins over their opponents Mimori and Itakozakura.

There shouldn't be any surprises in the match-making for the final round now. Makushita and jonokuchi will get the straight-up yusho deciders between each division's respective 6-0 contenders (in jonokuchi it's been a year since we last had that), while there should be a cross-divisional Sd/Jd pairing between Fujinowaka and Motobayashi to decide which of these two divisions will see a Day 15 playoff. You'd have to think it'll be jonidan.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Day 12 (results, text-only results)

10-2 Sw Takakeisho

9-3 Se Mitakeumi, M8e Okinoumi, M8w Takarafuji, M10w Meisei, M14e Tsurugisho

8-4 O1w Goeido, M2w Asanoyama, M16e Yutakayama

And there's our second undisputed leader of the tournament - Okinoumi held the top spot alone for three days of action from Day 6 to 8, if new leader Takakeisho can go one day better than that the yusho will be his. But equally important today's 10th victory of his basho, earned against Myogiryu, also secured the sekiwake's shortcut return to the ozeki rank. With almost anybody else I'd be inclined to question his ability to maintain composure and motivation for the home stretch after such a milestone, but Takakeisho just might have the sheer single-mindedness required to keep forging ahead.

Most of the pursuers managed to keep up, including Okinoumi who was paired up with erstwhile co-leader Meisei and dragged him into the chasing pack as the young upstart was unable to secure a grip on the veteran and found himself shoved out of the ring before too long. Mitakeumi featured in the day's highlight bout (if we ignore that the spotlight ended up on Shikimori Inosuke for all the wrong reasons...), and prevailed decisively over struggling ozeki Tochinoshin who gave up morozashi to the sekiwake and was quickly ousted. Tochinoshin's back is now to the wall at 5-7 and a second demotion from ozeki looms large.

Surprise packages Takarafuji and Tsurugisho round out the new pursuers group thanks to clever sumo against their opponents Enho and Sadanoumi. Asanoyama, meanwhile, did not move up to 9-3 like the others, having failed to defeat his nemesis Daieisho once again. (7th straight head-to-head loss!)

And last not least Goeido is now sure to still be called ozeki in Kyushu thanks to earning his kachikoshi against Ryuden, in another Inosuke-marred bout. Both komusubi stand at 7-5 after today, Abi with a win over Shodai and Endo after a loss to Tamawashi. It still looks quite probable that no regular sanyaku slots will come available with all four incumbents en route to KK and Tochinoshin likely to take over the slot vacated by Takakeisho. Asanoyama remains a hot candidate to get victimized by that with already 8 wins at M2, but Hokutofuji (defeated Chiyotairyu today) up at M1e with a 6-6 record may also still cause headaches for the banzuke committee if he gets to kachikoshi.

    4-4-4 Kakuryu       Y    Hakuho       0-2-10
    kyujo Takayasu      O1   Goeido        8-4
     5-7  Tochinoshin   O2
     9-3  Mitakeumi     S    Takakeisho   10-2
     7-5  Abi           K    Endo          7-5

     6-6  Hokutofuji    M1
                        M2   Asanoyama     8-4
     5-7  Daieisho      M3   Tomokaze      6-6
     7-5  Tamawashi     M4
                        M5   Ryuden        6-6
                        M6   Myogiryu     6-4-2 (x)
                        M7
     9-3  Okinoumi      M8   Takarafuji    9-3
                        M9
                        M10  Meisei        9-3
                        ...
     9-3  Tsurugisho    M14


Terutsuyoshi presumably has little interest in becoming the first rikishi ever to find himself in juryo two tournaments after scoring 12 wins in makuuchi (query), so today's torikumi saw him unleash a massive henka on Azumaryu for his third win of the basho. Sophomore top division member Takagenji is already certain to be headed back to the second tier after loss #9 at the hands of Nishikigi, who himself is finally good to go for Kyushu now. Further head-to-head action in the low maegashira ranks had Daishoho dominate Tochiozan, which leaves both men with two more wins to go for the final three days.

Yutakayama is definitely safe as he became outright kachikoshi at visiting Chiyoshoma's expense today, while Kagayaki and Ishiura failed to secure their makuuchi memberships against Onosho and Kotoeko for now.

Over in the second division we finally have our first KK rikishi above J11 and it's Takanosho who is in very good position to stage a top division return after 10 months under the not so bright lights of juryo. The rest of the promotion race remains an utter mess and it's probably for the best that it appears that only up to 3 spots will likely need to be filled in makuuchi. The most noteworthy development of the last few days is arguably Wakatakakage's battle back from 2-6 to an even record and into the field of contenders.

(1)  3-9  Terutsuyoshi  M9
                        M10
                        M11
                        M12  Daishoho      4-8  (2)
(1)  5-7  Kagayaki      M13  Nishikigi     6-6  (o)
                        M14  Toyonoshima  1-9-2 (x)
(1)  6-6  Ishiura       M15  Azumaryu      6-6  (1)
(o)  8-4  Yutakayama    M16  Tochiozan     6-6  (2)
(x)  3-9  Takagenji     M17  ---

(2)  6-6  Chiyomaru     J1   Daiamami      5-7  (3)
(1)  8-4  Takanosho     J2   Chiyoshoma    5-7  (~)
(3)  6-6  Tokushoryu    J3   Wakatakakage  6-6  (3)
(~)  6-6  Yago          J4   Kiribayama    6-6  (~)
(3)  7-5  Daishomaru    J5
                        J6   Hidenoumi     7-5  (~)
(x)  6-6  Kyokushuho    J7
                        ...
(~)  9-3  Kotonowaka    J11
                        J12  Ikioi        10-2  (~)


Two more rikishi can look forward to their sekitori salary for November and December: Sokokurai finally clinched a safe record against Irodori after four previous losses in a row, and Kaio-trained newcomer Kaisho secured his kachikoshi defeating Chiyonoumi. The Kokonoe man has probably punched his ticket to makushita with that loss, his 10th of the basho.

Asagyokusei avoided that fate for the moment with victory over Mitoryu, but does still need to win all three remaining matches from here, and the same goes for Irodori after today's mentioned loss to Sokokurai. Gagamaru was also unsuccessful against upper-ranked Kiribayama and remains at risk of doing the relatively rare trip from Juryo 2 to makushita in just two tournaments.

No relevant action in makushita today after everyone got their work in on Day 11 already.

                        J5   Takanofuji   kyujo (x)
                        J6
                        J7   Yoshikaze    0-0-5 (i)
                        ...
(2)  4-8  Gagamaru      J10  Sokokurai     6-6  (o)
                        J11  Chiyonoumi    2-10 (~)
(x) 2-7-3 Seiro         J12
(3)  4-8  Irodori       J13
(3)  5-7  Asagyokusei   J14  Kaisho        8-4  (o)

(o)  5-1  Wakamotoharu  Ms1
(o)  5-1  Akua          Ms2  Chiyonoo      3-3
                        Ms3
                        Ms4  Kototebakari  4-2
     3-3  Hoshoryu      Ms5  Akiseyama     3-3
     4-2  Churanoumi    Ms6  Tsurubayashi  3-3
                        Ms7  Chiyootori    5-1

Kototebakari is being held back for a juryo appearance, and I do believe Chiyonoo, Hoshoryu and Akiseyama all are as well. At least one of the two Ms5's will definitely have to be sent up into juryo as their other possible opponents are already scheduled in makushita for Day 13. The other Ms5 could also face off against Chiyonoo, although it would be rather strange to see a Ms2-ranked rikishi avoid the exchange bout while somebody ranked much lower has to do it. We'll see how that pans out.

 

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Juryo yusho race:

10-2 J12w Ikioi

9-3 J11e Kotonowaka

8-4 J2e Takanosho, J14w Kaisho

And there's finally a sole leader in juryo as well; Ikioi and Kotonowaka had topped the yusho arasoi together since Day 9, but only the veteran remains standing now after Kotonowaka was defeated by always-dangerous Kyokutaisei. The wannabe pursuers at 4 losses dropped half their membership with Daishomaru (lost to Ikioi) and Kizakiumi falling to 7-5 and only Takanosho and Kaisho securing their KKs today.

With the race looking like it might be finishing up early after all the schedulers have blinked and decided to give us Ikioi vs Kotonowaka for tomorrow. Almost unassailable lead or back to two leaders? We'll see! The 8-4 duo has to hope for the latter outcome, but will of course have to win themselves as well - Kaisho will try to do so against promotion-seeking 6-6 Wakatakakage, and Takanosho makes his second makuuchi appearance of the basho, this time against 6-6 Azumaryu.


Lower division yusho races:

6-0 Ms27e Terunofuji (Isegahama)
6-0 Ms46w Chiyonokuni (Kokonoe)

6-0 Sd6e Tsushida (Tokitsukaze)
6-0 Sd46w Sadanohikari (Sakaigawa)
6-0 Sd96w Fujinowaka (Fujishima)

6-0 Jd16e Motobayashi (Naruto)
6-0 Jd48w Sadanohana (Sakaigawa)
6-0 Jd98w Aomihama (Dewanoumi)

6-0 Jk27e Murata (Takasago)
6-0 Jk30e Omura (Michinoku)

All the regularly expected bouts have been scheduled here, so three yusho will be decided within the next few hours with only either sandanme or jonidan getting extended to a senshuraku playoff.

Edited by Asashosakari
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The former sekitori through Day 12.

new KK: Churanoumi, Hakuyozan, Kitaharima, Tokushinho, Amakaze

new MK: Arawashi, Asabenkei, Chiyoarashi, Higonojo, Jokoryu, Takaryu, Masunoyama, Daikiho
 

Record   Rank   Shikona Heya Age Out
5-1 Ms1e Wakamotoharu Arashio 25 3
2-4 Ms1w Arawashi Minezaki 33 1
5-1 Ms2e Akua Tatsunami 28 6
3-3 Ms2w Chiyonoo Kokonoe 28 5
kyujo Ms3w Ryuko Onoe 21 1
3-3 Ms5w Akiseyama Kise 34 1
 
4-2 Ms6e Churanoumi Kise 25 2
2-4 Ms7e Asabenkei Takasago 30 8
5-1 Ms7w Chiyootori Kokonoe 26 11
3-3 Ms9w Daiseido Kise 26 3
3-3 Ms10w Toyohibiki Sakaigawa 34 10
3-3 Ms12e Fujiazuma Tamanoi 32 15
4-2 Ms14e Sakigake Shibatayama 33 28
 
3-3 Ms16w Kizenryu Kise 34 7
4-2 Ms17w Hakuyozan Takadagawa 24 2
2-4 Ms18w Chiyoarashi Kokonoe 28 37
3-3 Ms24w Sagatsukasa Irumagawa 37 33
6-0 Ms27e Terunofuji Isegahama 27 8
2-4 Ms27w Higonojo Kise 34 32
4-2 Ms28e Kitaharima Yamahibiki 33 12
2-4 Ms29e Jokoryu Kise 31 4
 
2-4 Ms35w Takaryu Kise 27 25
4-2 Ms36w Kagamio Kagamiyama 31 20
3-3 Ms37w Nionoumi Yamahibiki 32 37
5-1 Ms39w Gokushindo Nishikido 23 5
1-5 Ms40e Asahisho Tomozuna 30 14
5-1 Ms43e Keitenkai Onomatsu 29 42
6-0 Ms46w Chiyonokuni Kokonoe 29 2
4-2 Ms49w Tokushinho Kise 35 23
2-4 Ms56w Masunoyama Chiganoura 28 27
 
2-4 Sd23w Yoshiazuma Tamanoi 42 30
0-6 Sd25e Kaonishiki Azumazeki 40 48
4-2 Sd27e Amakaze Oguruma 28 9
1-5 Sd28w Dairaido Takadagawa 39 78
3-3 Sd52e Homarefuji Isegahama 34 7
5-1 Sd63e Hitenryu Tatsunami 35 48
2-4 Sd89e Daikiho Miyagino 30 10
 
kyujo Jd36w Ura Kise 27 10


Daikiho jonidan-bound... :-( And a full year of MKs for Jokoryu.

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Day 13 (results, text-only results)

10-3 Se Mitakeumi, Sw Takakeisho, M8e Okinoumi, M14e Tsurugisho

9-4 O1w Goeido, M2w Asanoyama, M8w Takarafuji, M10w Meisei, M16e Yutakayama

8-5 Ke Abi, Kw Endo, M12e Shohozan

Welcome to makujuryo, I guess. Ozeki Goeido appeared to come in with a clear battle plan against Takakeisho and executed it to perfection, so the sekiwake's yusho lead only lasted a single day.

Three out of five pursuers took advantage of the leader's stumble and closed the gap. Tsurugisho and Takarafuji were paired up among the 9-3's entering Day 13, and top division newcomer Tsurugisho executed a powerful sukuinage counter when it already looked like his veteran opponent had this one in the bag. Mitakeumi overcame Myogiryu, who had been troublesome to him of late (three straight losses dating back to last November), although the victory was rather too close for comfort, and Okinoumi demonstrated why he's in the yusho hunt and opponent Kagayaki is battling against demotion. Youngster Meisei failed to move up to double-digit wins, however, losing an entertaining if rather messy match against Shohozan.

Further to those developments at the top the 9-4 pursuer group is even more crowded than the leading section, courtesy of wins for all three rikishi who came into the day with 8-4 records. Besides Goeido, these were Asanoyama who thrust down Tamawashi after being put on the defensive, and Yutakayama who used his superior reach to keep tricky opponent Enho at distance until an opportunity for a slapdown presented itself.

New co-leader Mitakeumi has now ensured his (only) second record with double-digit victories in his 16-basho sanyaku stint, which should lead to renewed ozeki speculations even if he doesn't win the yusho. Both komusubi Abi and Endo are kachikoshi after defeating MK-bound Shimanoumi and Kotoshogiku respectively (great defensive work by Endo against the ex-ozeki!), giving us the first tournament since Kyushu 2006 in which all lower sanyaku rikishi have gone KK. Incidentally, that was also the last time the banzuke committee allowed for discretionary extra promotions of maegashira into sanyaku.

Hokutofuji and Asanoyama remain on course to test the committee's resolve on that subject, though a lifeline remains for at least one of them in the form of Tochinoshin's anti-kadoban quest; today's hard-fought victory over Ryuden leaves him just two more shiroboshi away from retaining his rank and freeing up Takakeisho's sekiwake position by proxy.

    4-4-5 Kakuryu       Y    Hakuho       0-2-11
    kyujo Takayasu      O1   Goeido        9-4
     6-7  Tochinoshin   O2
    10-3  Mitakeumi     S    Takakeisho   10-3
     8-5  Abi           K    Endo          8-5

     7-6  Hokutofuji    M1
                        M2   Asanoyama     9-4
     6-7  Daieisho      M3   Tomokaze      6-7
     7-6  Tamawashi     M4
                        M5   Ryuden        6-7  (x)
                        M6
                        M7
    10-3  Okinoumi      M8   Takarafuji    9-4
                        M9
                        M10  Meisei        9-4
                        ...
    10-3  Tsurugisho    M14
                        M15
     9-4  Yutakayama    M16

There are no Day 14 matchups scheduled among the 10-3's or among the 9-4's, so we could be ending up with as many as 9 leaders after tomorrow. The highlight bout will be the one that does involve 2 of these 9 contenders, as leader Mitakeumi will be challenged by pursuer Goeido. Next in the way of Tochinoshin's ozeki survival is Myogiryu, who holds a respectable 9-12 H2H record against the ozeki and has won their most recent two meetings, both earlier this year.


The Day 13 happenings among the low maegashira are easily summed: Henka payback for yesterday's perp Terutsuyoshi at the hands of Ishiura, and losses for everybody else. Ishiura is now good to go for Kyushu with 7 wins and may even still achieve another makuuchi kachikoshi again after six failed attempts.

The day also finally brought us our first certain promotion from juryo, where Takanosho collected win #9 in decisive fashion on his day trip to makuuchi against Azumaryu. Top-ranked Chiyomaru scored his 7th win and would be a definitive promotee as well with one more, but after that the options already get very thin - Wakatakakage (5th straight win) and Daishomaru can still get there with double success on the weekend, but that's already it for potential clear choices. Considering that two top division spots have been freed up for sure by Toyonoshima and Takagenji, we could end up seeing a lot of very lucky rikishi here, and by recent precedent this would probably mean maegashira incumbents. That's especially good news for Daishoho and Tochiozan who'd ordinarily need to win both remaining bouts after today's losses but could well end up saving their hides with just one.

(1)  3-10 Terutsuyoshi  M9
                        M10
                        M11
                        M12  Daishoho      4-9  (2)
(1)  5-8  Kagayaki      M13
                        M14  Toyonoshima  1-9-3 (x)
(o)  7-6  Ishiura       M15  Azumaryu      6-7  (1)
                        M16  Tochiozan     6-7  (2)
(x)  3-10 Takagenji     M17  ---

(1)  7-6  Chiyomaru     J1   Daiamami      5-8  (x)
(o)  9-4  Takanosho     J2   Chiyoshoma    6-7  (~)
(~)  6-7  Tokushoryu    J3   Wakatakakage  7-6  (2)
(x)  6-7  Yago          J4   Kiribayama    6-7  (x)
(2)  8-5  Daishomaru    J5
                        J6   Hidenoumi     7-6  (x)
                        ...
(x)  9-4  Kotonowaka    J11
                        J12  Ikioi        11-2  (~)


In lower juryo newcomer Asagyokusei's hopes to remain in the division may have been dashed by Tobizaru today, as he's now makekoshi and demotable from J14. However, given that no less than four slots will be vacated ahead of him a 7-8 finish might still see him survive. He has fallen behind Irodori for the moment, however, after the second-time juryo member managed to defeat high-ranked veteran Tokushoryu. Gagamaru got a quick victory over Mitoryu today and continues to hold the best position of those who aren't out of the woods yet. Chiyonoumi, meanwhile, battled valiantly against Ichiyamamoto but just couldn't finish him off, and with 11 losses there should be no way for him to stay in the division anymore.

The only active competitor on the makushita side was Wakamotoharu who has finished his basho with a 6-1 record after a close utchari victory over rather lower-ranked opponent Shonannoumi. Should be a decent boost into juryo for Kyushu basho. (Then again, his first promotion came via 7-0 and a debut up at J10 wasn't enough to avoid the immediate return to makushita due to only 5 wins scored.)

                        J5   Takanofuji   kyujo (x)
                        J6
                        J7   Yoshikaze    0-0-5 (i)
                        ...
(1)  5-8  Gagamaru      J10
                        J11  Chiyonoumi    2-11 (x)
(x) 2-7-4 Seiro         J12
(2)  5-8  Irodori       J13
(~)  5-8  Asagyokusei   J14

(o)  6-1  Wakamotoharu  Ms1
(o)  5-1  Akua          Ms2  Chiyonoo      3-3
                        Ms3
                        Ms4  Kototebakari  4-2
     3-3  Hoshoryu      Ms5  Akiseyama     3-3
     4-2  Churanoumi    Ms6  Tsurubayashi  3-4  (x)
                        Ms7  Chiyootori    5-1

Under normal circumstances I really should be marking Kototebakari as a certain promotion by now as he ought to be guaranteed at least the fourth promotion slot, but given other idiosyncratic decisions in recent times, who knows if they wouldn't consider Churanoumi at 5-2 or Chiyootori at 6-1 to be ahead of him. He does get the opportunity to decide his own fate tomorrow, being one of two makushitans sent up into juryo; he will face Gagamaru. Also going for a visit is Hoshoryu against Irodori. Chiyonoo and Akiseyama remain available for further crossover duty or could (as mentioned yesterday) also play off for one kachikoshi on senshuraku.

Akua and Chiyootori are also in action against one another tomorrow, a bout that ordinarily wouldn't have promotion implications but might here.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Juryo yusho race:

11-2 J12w Ikioi

10-3 ---

9-4 J2e Takanosho, J11e Kotonowaka

It's not officially decided yet, but it's looking rather good for Ikioi to win his second juryo championship after Kyushu 2011. Kotonowaka gave him a good challenge, but the veteran was able to defend everything thrown at him to move two clear in the race.

Takanosho, last seen co-leading at 6-2, has rallied back into somewhat-contention with three straight wins, and has it in his hands to extend this race to full length - he's Ikioi's opponent for tomorrow. Kaisho, the other contender who entered at 8-4, found himself semi-henkaed by Wakatakakage and wasn't able to retain his spot. Kotonowaka goes up against promotion-seeking Tokushoryu on Day 14.


Lower division yusho races (Day 13 results):

6-1 Ms27e Terunofuji (Isegahama)
7-0 Ms46w Chiyonokuni (Kokonoe)

6-1 Sd6e Tsushida (Tokitsukaze)
7-0 Sd46w Sadanohikari (Sakaigawa)
6-1 Sd96w Fujinowaka (Fujishima)

7-0 Jd16e Motobayashi (Naruto)
6-1 Jd48w Sadanohana (Sakaigawa)
7-0 Jd98w Aomihama (Dewanoumi)

7-0 Jk27e Murata (Takasago)
6-1 Jk30e Omura (Michinoku)

The makushita decider was a see-saw match that lived up to its billing and then some, with Chiyonokuni eventually able to find an opening to oust ex-ozeki Terunofuji from the dohyo. He has now won yusho in every division from jonidan to juryo, and while a future makuuchi title would be a great story, let's hope he doesn't ever get an opportunity to contend for one in jonokuchi.

The banzuke committee was very generous to his stablemate Chiyonoo after his makushita yusho last time, moving him from Ms41w all the way up to Ms2w, and given how upper makushita appears to shape up for Kyushu it's conceivable that Chiyonokuni could get similarly lucky, rather than end up around Ms4-5 as 7-0 records typically do from his current ranking. Terunofuji for his part should find himself ranked Ms10-ish next basho, so still only high enough to gun for promotion via zensho.

It will be the jonidan division that gets to share in the senshuraku spotlight, courtesy of Motobayashi's rather quick victory over Fujinowaka. Aomihama earned the other playoff spot defeating fellow lower makushita-experienced Sadanohana, also with ease. It wasn't all bad for Sakaigawa-beya, however, as Sadanohikari converted the stable's other yusho opportunity, pulling down an overeager Tsushida shortly after the tachiai. The sandanme championship is the first yusho for the 23-year-old Mongolian who has struggled to make major headway in his 5-year career thus far, but will now be making his long-awaited makushita debut off this basho's result. Oddly enough he could well be meeting Tsushida there again: 7-0 from Sd46 and 6-1 from Sd6 should both be tickets to ranks around the Ms30 mark.

Finally, the jonokuchi title went the expected way with Murata defeating Omura in a match that had a bit of a Man vs. Boy look to it. For Kyushu just change the Jk in his ranking to Jd and subtract 10, and you probably have Murata's approximate position on the next banzuke, where he'll almost certainly be the favourite to win the divisional championship as well.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Day 14 (results, text-only results)

11-3 Se Mitakeumi, Sw Takakeisho, M8e Okinoumi

10-4 M2w Asanoyama, M14e Tsurugisho

9-5 O1w Goeido, Ke Abi, M8w Takarafuji, M10w Meisei, M12e Shohozan, M16e Yutakayama

As if a basho with such a free-for-all yusho race weren't controversial enough... After Tsurugisho got overwhelmed in short order by Kotoyuki and thus failed in his bid for an 11th win, three successive matches late in the session featured the remaining co-leaders - all of whom were victorious. However, both Okinoumi's win by (questionable) judge stoppage against Endo and Mitakeumi's cheap henka over ozeki Goeido were probably not what most people were hoping to see. Takakeisho arguably provided the one bright spot here with his speedy dismantling of Ryuden, which also sent the latter to his makekoshi.

Yesterday's five-strong group of 9-4 contenders mostly fell by the wayside, with only Asanoyama collecting his 10th win at Tomokaze's expense (another one newly, and in his case first time, makekoshi). With that record he's now in range for what would certainly be called exceptionally bad banzuke luck if he doesn't receive a sanyaku promotion. The same goes for Hokutofuji after today, having clinched kachikoshi against Tamawashi despite his 1-6 start into the tournament. As Katooshu mentioned in the catch-all thread, no kachikoshi M1e has been denied promotion in half a century, so this would definitely be a new milestone if he doesn't make it. Of course, a 9th win tomorrow would all but force their hand, IMHO, as would an 11th for Asanoyama.

Tochinoshin unwittingly (and unwillingly) provided the final impetus for this sanyaku crunch when he completed the loss of his ozeki rank in one of the most anti-climactic ways I recall seeing in a must-win demotion bout. That being said the bout may well have gone Myogiryu's way even without that early finish, so it's hard to say the ozeki's makekoshi is undeserved. My reservations about his career longevity aside I'm still going to root for him to collect his 10 wins once more in November.

With Endo's weird loss and Abi's clear victory over Takarafuji the four (regular) lower sanyaku spots should be set not only in composition but also in order, with Mitakeumi and Tochinoshin as East and West Sekiwake, and Abi and Endo retaining their respective komusubi positions; whatever the banzuke committee decides to do about Hokutofuji and/or Asanoyama, a discretionary promotion of Abi to sekiwake with "only" 9 or 10 wins should be a major longshot. (Before anyone says, "but he's had back-to-back KK and maybe 18 wins!": Query.)

    4-4-6 Kakuryu       Y    Hakuho       0-2-12
    kyujo Takayasu      O1   Goeido        9-5
(x)  6-8  Tochinoshin   O2
    11-3  Mitakeumi     S    Takakeisho   11-3
     9-5  Abi           K    Endo          8-6

     8-6  Hokutofuji    M1
                        M2   Asanoyama    10-4
     7-7  Daieisho      M3   Tomokaze      6-8  (x)
     7-7  Tamawashi     M4
                        M5
                        M6
                        M7
    11-3  Okinoumi      M8   Takarafuji    9-5
                        M9
                        M10  Meisei        9-5  (x)
                        ...
(x) 10-4  Tsurugisho    M14
                        M15
(x)  9-5  Yutakayama    M16

The torikumi makers have decided to forego the regularly expected Takakeisho-Abi matchup for tomorrow in favour of Takakeisho-Okinoumi, which will serve to ensure a yusho line of 12-3. Of course, the winner of that matchup will have to wait a few more minutes to find out whether or not Mitakeumi manages to defeat Endo and set up a playoff for the title. The bad taste of today's henka win aside, I suspect most fans will be rooting for the playoff option. (But how crazy would it be if Okinoumi wins his match and then Endo of all people hands him the title by beating Mitakeumi?)

These two matches will be part of the sanyaku soroibumi lineup, but the basho will be concluded by the ozeki confrontation between Goeido and Tochinoshin. As I said a few days ago I wasn't too keen on the possibility of "nothing to fight for" Goeido vs. 7-7 Tochinoshin, but with Tochinoshin makekoshi it's not much better. If nothing else, let's hope both guys use the opportunity to close the tournament with a good straight-forward match with no audience-insulting shenanigans.


I don't know how he did it, but Takagenji beat Terutsuyoshi having all but lost the match about seventeen different times before already. Terutsuyoshi remains very much in danger of demotion after that, as does everybody else who wasn't already safe yesterday. Tochiozan is even outright demotable after his third straight defeat for his lowest-ranked makekoshi ever. (He never had one on the way up through makushita and juryo a decade and a half ago.) It remains to be seen if he actually does get demoted since the number of possible candidates for a trip down continues to exceed those bidding for a ticket up.

Daishoho was the only demotion contender able to improve his position today, though he didn't have to do much more than let Chiyotairyu fall on his face after deflecting his tachiai charge. Azumaryu's feel-good story ended (for now) in makekoshi through a pushout by Shohozan, and Kagayaki flung himself off the dohyo against Kotoeko.

The juryo division does have its second proper claimant after today, thanks to Chiyomaru obtaining his kachikoshi against Tobizaru, so at least the slots opened up by Toyonoshima and Takagenji can be filled with certainty. Both further candidates Wakatakakage (decisively in makuuchi against Ishiura) and Daishomaru (over Kyokutaisei) were also victorious on Day 14 and can still reach promotable-looking final scores tomorrow. Promotion on their existing win totals is also in the realm of possibility, but nobody besides a senshuraku-losing Tochiozan would really look bad enough to drop, so that's not something they should count on.

Tokushoryu is still in with a shout at 7-7 after defeating erstwhile yusho candidate Kotonowaka today, especially if the other two contenders both lose tomorrow. Ikioi is the freshly crowned juryo champion having dispatched chaser Takanosho, and provides a wildcard for the promotion race.

(1)  3-11 Terutsuyoshi  M9
                        M10
                        M11
                        M12  Daishoho      5-9  (1)
(1)  5-9  Kagayaki      M13
                        M14  Toyonoshima  1-9-4 (x)
                        M15  Azumaryu      6-8  (1)
                        M16  Tochiozan     6-8  (~)
(x)  4-10 Takagenji     M17  ---

(o)  8-6  Chiyomaru     J1
(o)  9-5  Takanosho     J2   Chiyoshoma    6-8  (x)
(~)  7-7  Tokushoryu    J3   Wakatakakage  8-6  (1)
                        J4
(1)  9-5  Daishomaru    J5
                        ...
                        J12  Ikioi        12-2  (~)

And in fact they have scheduled Ikioi vs Tokushoryu for tomorrow. That's a much more relevant matchup than pre-Day 15 juryo winners usually get to close out their campaigns (which tend to be against the likes of random 8-6 or 5-9 guys), so I'm inclined to believe the committee have their eyes on him as a promotion candidate.

Another matchup that smacks of a certain deliberateness is Tochiozan's, as he has been set against long-time top division companion Kotoshogiku for what will be their 40th (and final?) meeting. Tochiozan leads this rivalry 20-19.

Unusually for this late in a basho they have also found a demotion-relevant head-to-head that hasn't happened yet, so Kagayaki and Azumaryu will contest for one safe spot. Daishoho will have to go against upper-ranked Shimanoumi (9-1 lead for Daishoho in this pairing!), while Terutsuyoshi battles Nishikigi who, being 6-8 at M13w, has nearly featured in this demotion race himself.


The suspense has largely lifted from the competition in low juryo after Gagamaru clinched a safe record against visitor Kototebakari and both Irodori and Asagyokusei dropped to 9 losses. Irodori's defeat came against highly regarded Hoshoryu whose newly attained minimum kachikoshi at Ms5 might see him get promoted to the sekitori ranks after all given the plethora of demotable candidates. (Considering the recent trend towards putting a premium on makushita rikishis' final matches in juryo, I guess Hoshoryu gets promoted now and Kototebakari doesn't? Now that would be something for them to take a stand on...)

In further Day 14 action Akua performed strongly against former komusubi Chiyootori and picked up a deserved win to get back to juryo with back-to-back 6-1 records.

                        J5   Takanofuji   kyujo (x)
                        J6
                        J7   Yoshikaze    0-0-5 (i)
                        ...
(o)  6-8  Gagamaru      J10
                        J11  Chiyonoumi    2-12 (x)
(x) 2-7-5 Seiro         J12
(~)  5-9  Irodori       J13
(x)  5-9  Asagyokusei   J14

(o)  6-1  Wakamotoharu  Ms1
(o)  6-1  Akua          Ms2  Chiyonoo      3-3
                        Ms3
                        Ms4  Kototebakari  4-3  (o)
(o)  4-3  Hoshoryu      Ms5  Akiseyama     3-3
     4-2  Churanoumi    Ms6
                        Ms7  Chiyootori    5-2

Asagyokusei should be done at 9 losses ("should be", not "is"), Irodori just might still hang on somehow if he can defeat 6-8 Tobizaru tomorrow. With the lack of actual exchange bout opportunities the schedulers have given Chiyonoo and Akiseyama their head-to-head KK playoff after all. (Which I personally feel rather conflicted about since I'd have liked both to get back to juryo...)

Under normal circumstances this should work out as promotions for the two 6-1's, the two 4-3's, the Chiyonoo-Akiseyama winner, and the last spot going to either Irodori, Churanoumi or Chiyootori, but what's normal these days. I've marked up the table with the sane outcome expectation anyway. For completeness, Churanoumi's possible backdoor path into juryo leads past Ms12w Oki, a 23-year-old talent who has achieved kachikoshi at his career-high rank here.

A possible complication might come about if Irodori, Akiseyama and Churanoumi all win. I don't know if they will feel like dropping a J13e 6-9 for a relatively weak promotion candidate, but there's also the issue that Ms6e 5-2 would arguably look too strong compared to Ms5w 4-3 even with the well-known invisible dividing line between Ms5 and Ms6 in play, so Churanoumi could then be the 5th promotion candidate ahead of Akiseyama (taking a slot that should definitely be available, rather than Irodori's)... All potentially rather messy.


And last not least, senshuraku will also feature the decision in the jonidan yusho race between still undefeated collegiate rookie Motobayashi and recent mid-makushita Aomihama. Judging the current skills of injury returnees is always a tricky matter, but from what I've seen Aomihama should be good enough to provide a stern test to the newcomer.

Edited by Asashosakari
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5 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Yesterday's five-strong group of 9-4 contenders mostly fell by the wayside, with only Asanoyama collecting his 10th win at Tomokaze's expense (another one newly, and in his case first time, makekoshi). With that record he's now in range for what would certainly be called exceptionally bad banzuke luck if he doesn't receive a sanyaku promotion. The same goes for Hokutofuji after today, having clinched kachikoshi against Tamawashi despite his 1-6 start into the tournament. As Katooshu mentioned in the catch-all thread, no kachikoshi M1e has been denied promotion in half a century, so this would definitely be a new milestone if he doesn't make it. Of course, a 9th win tomorrow would all but force their hand, IMHO, as would an 11th for Asanoyama.

 

Anyone else feel like skipping GTB for Kyushu?  Maybe entering stealthily under a different name from a different computer?  It feels like it's going to be a completely different game than usual.

Edited by Gurowake

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8 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

Anyone else feel like skipping GTB for Kyushu?  Maybe entering stealthily under a different name from a different computer?  It feels like it's going to be a completely different game than usual.

I'm currently thinking of what the low maegashira ranks may have to look like if they do add two sanyaku slots and I'm ready to weep.

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if you create two sanyaku slots, who for M1, M2 and M3 ?

daeisho Myaguru

okinoumi tarakafuji

kotoyuki Meisei

... why not ... big jump but they deserve

Edited by Umizoi

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I think they will create an extra Komosubi slot for Hokutofuji and the rest are out of luck. 

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3 hours ago, Gurowake said:

 

Anyone else feel like skipping GTB for Kyushu?  Maybe entering stealthily under a different name from a different computer?  It feels like it's going to be a completely different game than usual. 

I'm looking forward to the rest of you cowering and brooding while I drink half a bottle of gin before making my final draft to win the yusho with 39 points. 

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2 hours ago, Umizoi said:

Myaguru

脈留 - absent vein? 

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10 hours ago, Gurowake said:

 

Anyone else feel like skipping GTB for Kyushu?  Maybe entering stealthily under a different name from a different computer?  It feels like it's going to be a completely different game than usual.

Either bet on the sanyaku or just put a 4 rikishi sanyaku and then do something weird like shift all west maegashira down 1 to hedge bets. Really weird.

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Day 15 (results, text-only results)

12-3 Se Mitakeumi, Sw Takakeisho

11-4 M8e Okinoumi

10-5 O1w Goeido, M2w Asanoyama, M10w Meisei, M14e Tsurugisho, M16e Yutakayama

With the two yokozuna and ozeki Takayasu out, Tochinoshin only held together by his bandages, and Goeido being Goeido, it's been a(nother) tournament for the new generation to make their mark. And that's what we got with the two current frontrunners of this generation - both Takakeisho and Mitakeumi easily dispatched of their senshuraku opponents Okinoumi and Endo, giving us the first-ever playoff involving two lower sanyaku wrestlers. And following another strong showing in their playoff battle the Aki 2019 top division champion is - Mitakeumi! The perennial sekiwake is now part of the rather exclusive club of two-time yusho winners below the rank of ozeki, and its first new member in just over two decades. His victory also completes a full 12 months with all different makuuchi yusho winners.

In addition, Mitakeumi was rewarded with one of four special prizes - he was already certain to receive one entering the day, but got to "upgrade" from the kanto-sho to the better regarded shukun-sho with his championship. Another shukun-sho went Asanoyama's way, acknowledging the maegashira's impressive 10 wins in his first ever joi kachikoshi, while a pair of kanto-sho were presented to veteran Okinoumi for his role in the yusho race (with an additional shukun-sho up for grabs, had he won the title), and to top division rookie Tsurugisho who excelled with 10 wins in his debut.

Champion Mitakeumi will certainly be considered for promotion to ozeki again in two months, with a likely target of another 12 wins to complete the standard goal of 33 wins. Given his lengthy tenure and track record in sanyaku it's unlikely that he'll be asked to achieve anything more than that, besides "showing good sumo". Whether or not 11 wins for a total of 32 will be deemed sufficient may depend on just who shows up (and stays) in Fukuoka - if it's another yokozuna-less tourney, 11 might not look that hot.

He won't be the only one trying to obtain the second-highest rank as about-to-be-demoted Tochinoshin will of course attempt to duplicate former ozeki Tochiazuma's feat of making it back with 10 wins twice. For now his ozeki career came to an end with a loss to Goeido in the tournament's final regulation match, which appeared to be a bit of an afterthought in between two sekiwakes' regular bouts and their playoff encounter. Goeido for his part has finished the basho with respectable 10 wins.

Both komusubi Abi and Endo were defeated to end their Aki campaigns, so there should be no doubt that they'll be appearing in Kyushu as komusubi as well. Whether or not they'll be the only ones... Promotion-contending Asanoyama may have made the banzuke committee's job a bit easier by losing to Meisei today; 10 wins from M2w isn't considerably better than results they've already given the thumbs down to in the recent past (9 from M1w, 11 from M3w), so I'm inclined to expect him in the maegashira ranks on the next banzuke.

Hokutofuji, however, posted his 8th win in a row against Takarafuji to finish the basho 9-6. The very top-ranked rikishi anywhere - be it M1e, J1e or Ms1e - have tended to receive preferential treatment no matter who's been in charge of the banzuke over the decades, and I just can't fathom that they're going to deny him a spot, especially considering he had posted the same 9 wins already from the M1 West side last time. So, I would expect that we'll be given a 10-rikishi sanyaku featuring 3 ozeki including repromoted Takakeisho as well as 3 komusubi. (My lawyer has advised me to add that this should not be considered as GTB advice...)

In any case the new joi-jin will include Daieisho once again following his second straight 8-7 record against top opposition (the ones available anyway), as well as Myogiryu who clinched his kachikoshi against Abi despite missing three days this basho. Okinoumi and resurgent Meisei will also get back up there, and so may Takarafuji who hasn't been seen in the joi in almost two years.

    4-4-7 Kakuryu       Y    Hakuho       0-2-13
    kyujo Takayasu      O1   Goeido       10-5
(x)  6-9  Tochinoshin   O2
    12-3  Mitakeumi     S    Takakeisho   12-3  (o)
     9-6  Abi           K    Endo          8-7

(?)  9-6  Hokutofuji    M1
                        M2   Asanoyama    10-5  (?)
     8-7  Daieisho      M3   Tomokaze      7-8
     7-8  Tamawashi     M4
                        M5
                        M6   Myogiryu     8-5-2
                        M7
    11-4  Okinoumi      M8   Takarafuji   9-6
                        M9   Kotoyuki     9-6
                        M10  Meisei      10-5


The results in the low maegashira and high juryo ranks ended up working out much less messily than one would have expected, mostly thanks to successful performances by those on the juryo side. Both Wakatakakage and Daishomaru won on senshuraku to earn promotion-worthy records #3 and #4, and the same number of top division slots is available now - Tochiozan's first appearance in juryo since 2007 was already likely before today, but another loss to Kotoshogiku made completely sure of it, and Azumaryu lost the demotion playoff against Kagayaki, who finally had a convincing match again.

Terutsuyoshi extricated himself from the demotion commotion at the last moment, defeating hapless Nishikigi, while Daishoho has a borderline demotable record at 5-10 with today's loss to Shimanoumi (despite the overwhelming historical advantage mentioned yesterday). Tokushoryu and juryo champion Ikioi essentially contested for the right to contest that spot, and that match went the 7-7 high-ranker's way, so it's between Tokushoryu and Daishoho for the final makuuchi spot in Kyushu. Recent trends should favour the incumbent here, but stranger things have happened.

Youngster Takagenji is headed back to juryo following back-to-back 4-11 results, while Wakatakakage will be bubbling up to the top flight for the first time after 9 appearances in juryo that included no less than 7 kachikoshi (albeit none better than 9-6). I don't rate his chances too highly as far as avoiding an immediate trip back down goes, but maybe he'll surprise. He will be the second top division-ranked wrestler to come out of Arashio-beya, following Sokokurai (who clinched his kachikoshi today, so a good Day 15 for the stable).

The big juryo story of the basho was of course Ikioi's revival. It remains to be seen if he can hold his physical condition together now or if this was just a last hurrah-type of result.

(o)  4-11 Terutsuyoshi  M9
                        M10
                        M11
                        M12  Daishoho      5-10 (?)
(o)  6-9  Kagayaki      M13
                        M14  Toyonoshima  1-9-5 (x)
                        M15  Azumaryu      6-9  (x)
                        M16  Tochiozan     6-9  (x)
(x)  4-11 Takagenji     M17  ---

(o)  8-7  Chiyomaru     J1
(o) 10-5  Takanosho     J2
(?)  8-7  Tokushoryu    J3   Wakatakakage  9-6  (o)
                        J4
(o) 10-5  Daishomaru    J5
                        ...
                        J12  Ikioi        12-3  (x)

A lot of rikishi are headed towards spots in the double-digit maegashira ranks for Kyushu, with those in the table joined by Nishikigi (M13w 6-9, three straight losses to end the basho), as well as erstwhile joi members Shodai, Ichinojo and Chiyotairyu who are all set to fall deeply. Some rikishi will end up very lucky here, but it's not at all clear who it will be at first glance.


And finally the finishing touches on the situation between juryo and makushita, where the most messy scenario ended up coming about. Akiseyama and Chiyonoo had to battle twice when their initial bout ended inconclusive, and the slight upset was achieved by Akiseyama here to pick up his last-minute kachikoshi, denying Chiyonoo the return to juryo for now. Akiseyama's own return can't be deemed a certainty, however, as Churanoumi collected the crucial 5th win and Irodori also made a final bid to retain his spot in the second division.

                        J5   Takanofuji   kyujo (x)
                        J6
                        J7   Yoshikaze    0-0-5 (i)
                        ...
                        J11  Chiyonoumi    2-13 (x)
(x) 2-7-6 Seiro         J12
(?)  6-9  Irodori       J13
(x)  5-10 Asagyokusei   J14

(o)  6-1  Wakamotoharu  Ms1
(o)  6-1  Akua          Ms2  Chiyonoo      3-4  (x)
                        Ms3
                        Ms4  Kototebakari  4-3  (o)
(o)  4-3  Hoshoryu      Ms5  Akiseyama     4-3  (?)
(?)  5-2  Churanoumi    Ms6
                        Ms7  Chiyootori    5-2  (??)

Barring major precedent-breaking decisions such as treating Chiyootori as more worthy than Akiseyama (or even than Hoshoryu), the first four KK on the ranking should be safe for promotion. Hoshoryu could well be seen as a worse candidate than Churanoumi, but even then he'd still be in line for one of the 5 definitely available spots. So, it should come down to two out of Irodori / Akiseyama / Churanoumi to complete the division. Churanoumi is of course outside the top 5 zone which tends to bring penalties, but we saw promotions with even worse rank/record combinations not that long ago when the juryo results demanded it. However, Irodori's position is significantly better than that of any of the demotees back there in Hatsu 2018, so he could well survive.

The good news is that Irodori's fate is really the only variable here - we'll find out the names of the promoted rikishi by Wednesday, and their number will tell us whether or not he hung on. My personal guess is that he drops and both Akiseyama and Churanoumi get to go back to juryo, but it's not something I'd tell you to bet your life savings on.

Either way we should be getting two fresh faces for juryo with Kototebakari (surely under a new shikona) and Hoshoryu. Both talents have moved up the banzuke at comparable speed, having taken 11 and 10 ranked tournaments respectively with each wrestler scoring just one 3-4 makekoshi along the way. We'll see if they're already good enough to hold their own in the paid ranks or if a bit more seasoning will be required.


Lastly, the makuuchi playoff of course wasn't the only one to be contested on senshuraku. The jonidan winner was still to be determined, and while recent makushitan Aomihama managed to defend against Motobayashi's initial onslaught off the tachiai, he gave up morozashi soon after and found himself across the bales in a matter of seconds. Second divisional yusho for Motobayashi, 20 won matches including the unofficial ones in maezumo and playoffs. I do suspect that upper sandanme will prove somewhat tougher for him, but he should be ranked high enough that 5 wins in Kyushu will get him to makushita for January. Aomihama for his part will appear near the very bottom of sandanme, where he could well be a threat for another 7-0 if no other rikishi with comparable pedigrees happen to be ranked in his vicinity.


As always thanks for reading and discussing all the promotion/demotion goings-on, let's do it all again in November. ;-)

Edited by Asashosakari
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On 23/09/2019 at 04:31, Asashosakari said:

So, I would expect that we'll be given a 10-rikishi sanyaku featuring 3 ozeki including repromoted Takakeisho as well as 3 komusubi.

If they really go for an extra sanyaku-slot,  would 3 sekiwake (Abi) be totally unreasonable?

Edited by Jakusotsu
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If they deny Hokutofuji promotion they're effectively saying that komusubi is now a maximum of two as well as a minimum.

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8 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

If they really go for an extra sanyaku-slot,  would 3 sekiwake (Abi) be totally unreasonable?

I would think so. Making him sekiwake leaves them open to issues with a 7-8 next basho. At komosubi with a 7-8 he's out of sanyaku. The problem is a traffic jam in sanyaku.. They don't want the extra slots if it can be helped. The best way to insure that is if you have to create one,  give the best chance of it going away next basho by making it the lowest one. 

This is going to become an issue though as it's clear they are getting some sanyaku level  rikishi but they aren't consistent enough for an ozeki run. 

Edited by Rocks

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11 minutes ago, ryafuji said:

If they deny Hokutofuji promotion they're effectively saying that komusubi is now a maximum of two as well as a minimum.

No they will be saying that to force a promotion, you need to do more than just a 9-6 from m1e. I expect that if he had been in contention for the title on the last day he would get promoted. They are just rasing the bar to a higher level than it was previously to open 3rd spots in the titled ranks. I am fine with that.

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If the 2 slots for Komusubi and Sekiwake were fixed, with the exception of a demoted Ozeki to make a 3rd Sekiwake-slot neccessary with the 2 present Sekiwake going KK, there wouldn't be a problem. But as the past showed us, these slots are not fixed to 2.

Denying Abi the promotion with 8-7 last basho was ok. Denying him the promotion again, this time with 9-6 is - in my spoiled, western eyes - a bit like not appreciating his accomplishments. Same for Hokutofuji and in a minor case for Endo.

2 past banzuke, one with 4 Komusubi, one with 4 Sekiwake. And in case of the Sekiwake, there was no Ozeki demotion involved. Just 4 guys who deserved to be Sekiwake. And there are more examples!

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Banzuke.aspx?b=196707&heya=-1&shusshin=-1

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Banzuke.aspx?b=197003&heya=-1&shusshin=-1

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All 47 M1e 9-6 have been promoted to san'yaku. Also, all 16 M2w 10-5 have enjoyed the same. I think Hokutofuji definitely gets promoted, Asanoyama might be too. I'm leaning on Abi staying at komusubi. 

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13 minutes ago, Atenzan said:

All 47 M1e 9-6 have been promoted to san'yaku. Also, all 16 M2w 10-5 have enjoyed the same.

But Kotoshogiku at m2e not

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Hokutofuji to komusubi

Asanoyama to M1e

Endo and Abi remain at komusubi

My predictions 

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