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2019 Aki Basho Discussion (spoiler alert!)

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19 minutes ago, Katooshu said:

Just to touch on some comments made the other day, Is Enho really that much more repetitive than the average rikishi? Most have a clear stylistic leaning that sees them execute a fairly narrow range of techniques far more than others--perhaps it's easiest to identify the numerous rikishi who start pretty much every match looking to score with pushing attacks. And despite his lack of size, I find he's often the one looking to go right in there, get a grip in close, and drive the opponent out or throw him down, with less 'avoidance sumo' than someone like Ishiura. Out of the smaller guys he's probably been my favourite to watch in the 4 years I've been following.

Enho is just the most noticeable because his style is markedly different from most, but everyone is repetitive. I don’t even need to describe the styles of Takakeisho, Kotoshogiku, Aoiyama, Abi, Hokutofuji, etc for you all to picture exactly how they fight. 

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26 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

Enho is just the most noticeable because his style is markedly different from most, but everyone is repetitive. I don’t even need to describe the styles of Takakeisho, Kotoshogiku, Aoiyama, Abi, Hokutofuji, etc for you all to picture exactly how they fight. 

Enho just does what he needs to do to be competitive in an open weight combat sport where he is fighting guys who are sometimes literally twice their size. If he tried going chest to chest with his opponents he would never have made it out of Sandame, let alone to Makuuchi. His style is the only thing that allows him to compete (well the other option would be henka and we know how popular that would be as well....). I love watching Enho wrestle, and so do the Japanese crowds (who are really the ones who count). Anyone his size who has managed to make it to Makuuchi should be applauded not complained about

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About the yusho race, recently it seems to me that when all the big contenders like Hakuho or Kakuryuu are out, the level of the other sanyaku seems more or less equal and all of them are bound to get a few losses either to eachother or joijin. Which opens the door to some well-performing low maegashira like Asanoyama or Meisei who might string together 13-14 wins and who won't have quality opposition until the final few days. So in a way the top without a clear leader are cancelling eachother out, while lower rankers on a hot streak have their chances open. I'm not sure I really like this situation, but that's how Makuuchi matchmaking works right now. I wouldn't be surprised if this basho ends with a 11-4 yusho. 

Edit : spelling... 

Edited by dingo

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I don't remember to have seen before a correction of the kimarite from a plain oshidashi to just the same plain yorikiri. (Takanosho-Tobizaru - looked OK as oshidashi for me. NHK may have better angles and an explanation - alas, today it's only on BS)

Kaisei looks like he's one of those who can heal on the dohyo - he's getting better day by day -  now just one away from kachikoshi. I had at first expected him to be 1 away from makekoshi instead by now.

Edited by Akinomaki
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When did Takarafuji join the yusho race?! I didn’t notice him creeping up. If Takakeisho loses today ...

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Hokutofuji having a roller coaster ride of a basho. A kinboshi, followed by 6 straight losses, followed by 5 straight wins. Will the real Hokutofuji please stand up?

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Takekeisho is once again an Ozeki (and has emerged as the favorite to win this basho).

Edited by Kaninoyama

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4 minutes ago, Kaninoyama said:

Takekeisho is once again officially an Ozeki!

Japanese media reports (and most of us) didn't think he will get 10 wins.   Now, he may even be on a Yokozuna run if he takes the yusho.   

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7 minutes ago, robnplunder said:

Japanese media reports (and most of us) didn't think he will get 10 wins.   Now, he may even be on a Yokozuna run if he takes the yusho.   

I can’t see a Sekiwake yusho counting towards a Yokozuna run, even if it is an Ozekiwake yusho. But then what do I know? 

Edited by Eikokurai

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1 minute ago, Eikokurai said:

I can’t see a Sekiwake yusho counting towards a Yokozuna run, even if it is an Ozekiwake yusho. But then what do I know? 

It's anyone's guess since it would be a first. I'd wager back-to-back yusho will grant him the rope.

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1 minute ago, Jakusotsu said:

It's anyone's guess since it would be a first. I'd wager back-to-back yusho will grant him the rope.

The desire to have a Japanese yokozuna is strong...

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17 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

It's anyone's guess since it would be a first. I'd wager back-to-back yusho will grant him the rope.

They were reluctant to make him Ozeki after his initial three-basho qualifying run, so it’d be quite the change of heart to break with tradition for a Yokozuna promotion and count a Sekiwake yusho. He has no proven track record at the Ozeki rank either. 

Edited by Eikokurai
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If both consecutive yusho are strong, say 13-2 & 14-1, then you'd think somebody would be inclined to discuss it. If one yusho is just 11 or 12 wins, then a wait and see attitude is far more likely.

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9 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

If both consecutive yusho are strong, say 13-2 & 14-1, then you'd think somebody would be inclined to discuss it. If one yusho is just 11 or 12 wins, then a wait and see attitude is far more likely.

Anything is possible. We have nothing to go on as nobody has ever managed a Sekiwake-Ozeki yusho combo in the 15-bout era. Futabayama managed it in the 30s and didn’t get promoted. That’s the closest to a precedent we have. Hakuho came damn close, losing in a playoff as Sekiwake, and didn’t get promoted. I think that’s the closest we come post-war.

Edited by Eikokurai

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You'll note I said discuss it. That's no guarantee they'll choose to promote. As Jakusotsu pointed out, it would be a first and it is anyone's guess. The speculation will be good fun.

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3 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

You'll note I said discuss it. That's no guarantee they'll choose to promote. As Jakusotsu pointed out, it would be a first and it is anyone's guess. The speculation will be good fun.

I did note.

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1 hour ago, Eikokurai said:

I can’t see a Sekiwake yusho counting towards a Yokozuna run, even if it is an Ozekiwake yusho. But then what do I know? 

It’s only possible in Sumo games , not in real sumo ;-)

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I have no idea how they would weigh the ozekiwake factor in Takakeisho's case - if that would give him an edge over Hakuho's sekiwake near-yusho. I think he would have to win outright - no ties that force a playoff match, and no so-called soft 11 or 12 win yusho to even get a discussion started. He doesn't do that, the scant historical precedent holds and he'll need to make it three in a row if he wants to debut as a yokozuna in his "hometown" basho.

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14 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

I have no idea how they would weigh the ozekiwake factor in Takakeisho's case - if that would give him an edge over Hakuho's sekiwake near-yusho. I think he would have to win outright - no ties that force a playoff match, and no so-called soft 11 or 12 win yusho to even get a discussion started. He doesn't do that, the scant historical precedent holds and he'll need to make it three in a row if he wants to debut as a yokozuna in his "hometown" basho.

In some ways the ‘Ozekiwake’ factor gives the Kyokai the perfect excuse to promote him if they want and not to if they don’t. If they want, they can easily justify it as a false Sekiwake rank and point to the kyujo as the cause, not lack of ability. On the other hand, if they feel it’s too soon, they have all of history behind them to be able to say it’s not sufficient to win as a Sekiwake. There’s just enough ambiguity and room for interpretation in the circumstances.

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Does anybody know if the guest commentator on Abema TV on Day 12 was Asahiyutaka Katsuteru? Looked like him.

As for the Enho discussion, I love to watch him fight. I always sit up and pay close attention because I know it’s going to be entertaining and a good scrap and anything can happen. I appreciate his skill and his heart going up against guys much bigger than him and admire his ability to pull off almost magical kimarite. I just don’t like to see him win as often as he does against rikishi I like much better. Maybe I feel almost as frustrated as they do...

Edited by since_94

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