code_number3

2019 Aki Basho Discussion (spoiler alert!)

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, Otokonoyama said:

It was a tsukihiza loss by Azumaryu. Doesn't matter who is the aggressor or initiates a throw. It's one of the five hiwaza causing a loss, just the same as ishamiashi, an inadvertent step-out. You can win the tachiai, drive your opponent straight back, be in complete control of the match to the tawara, and then lose putting a toe over. Sucks, but thems the rules.

This is a very well articulated and informative explanation of something we know to be true. It’s the nature of the sport. As, unfortunately, are botched calls, despite this being the age of video replay. Still not crying any tears for Endo in that match because Azamaryu owned him, and I hope the rest of the makuuchi figure out how to do the same before too long. So tired of all Enho’s matches starting exactly the same way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

Oh-ah-zoom-ah got him good the other day... 

Would have mistaken him for Kitazakura.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Otokonoyama said:

FWIW, yesterday Mainoumi made a point of stating it was not a henka versus Endo.  Ajigawa oyakata said that he slipped right giving the appearance of going for mae-mitsu or migi-uwate, then took a swing and slapped Endo down.

Not surprised that would be Aminishiki's opinion - he did that himself a fair few times in his career.

Edited by ryafuji
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ryafuji said:

Not surprised that would be Aminishiki's opinion - he's did that himself a fair few times in his career.

Oh sure, I'll bet pretty much anything that the members of this forum have a much broader definintion of henka than do the Japanese.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

Oh-ah-zoom-ah got him good the other day...

The world's oldest-looking 29 year old will be back in makushita next basho. His chances of taking the sandanme yusho have evaporated as he has been paired with Chiyonnokuni tomorrow. He DID beat Chiyonokuni last time they met... but that was in 2008.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, since_94 said:

This is a very well articulated and informative explanation of something we know to be true. It’s the nature of the sport. As, unfortunately, are botched calls, despite this being the age of video replay. Still not crying any tears for Endo in that match because Azamaryu owned him, and I hope the rest of the makuuchi figure out how to do the same before too long. So tired of all Enho’s matches starting exactly the same way.

As opposed to all those which start out with, say, two blokes smashing into each other’s chests? :-P

  • Haha 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Agreed. I think once the current Y/O are gone, which shouldn’t be too long away, that our upper sanyaku is going to be Mitakeumi, Takakeisho, Asanoyama, Hokutofuji and Tomokaze, with the likes of Abi, Meisei, Kotoeko, and a few others taking turns in the joi and lower sanyaku ranks. I think Takayasu will stick around for a while if his injury heals as he’s still one of the better wrestlers right now. He just seems to have terrible luck.

Takayasu is also fairly younger than the rest of the bunch. Literally the only one on his 20s. If he can recover and find his ozeki run form, he might have a blessed chance against opposition that's either unexperienced or old & busted up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

Asanoyama would would be tying Kotonishiki's record of winning a hiramaku yusho twice, only without a seven year gap in between.

Is a hiramaku yusho a yusho by a rank and file megashira? The term is not in the glossary, but I see from an internet search that hirumaku is another term for megashira.. Three of the megashira still right in the thick of it, including Asanoyama who seems to be wrestling well again. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Thundersnow said:

Is a hiramaku yusho a yusho by a rank and file megashira? 

Yes it is.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to see a Asanoyama v. Takakeisho play-off to determine the yusho. When was the last playoff to determine a yusho? Being fairly new to sumo, I haven't seen one yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Dwale said:

Enho should have done nekodamashi.

whith this kumikata battle, they both looked like fine swordmen ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, nelimw said:

I would like to see a Asanoyama v. Takakeisho play-off to determine the yusho. When was the last playoff to determine a yusho? Being fairly new to sumo, I haven't seen one yet. 

September 2017, after a 2-3 start Harumafuji went 9-1 over the final 10 days and then beat Goeido in an 11-4 yusho playoff.

Not too long afterwards, karaoke happened.

Edited by Katooshu
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Rainoyama said:

Takakeisho better watch out for the  Tochi henka tomorow...

I think Tochi would have trouble this basho with getting kachikoshi, maybe he will win maybe Takakeisho will win, Takakeisho looking good this basho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Agreed. I think once the current Y/O are gone, which shouldn’t be too long away, that our upper sanyaku is going to be Mitakeumi, Takakeisho, Asanoyama, Hokutofuji and Tomokaze, with the likes of Abi, Meisei, Kotoeko, and a few others taking turns in the joi and lower sanyaku ranks. I think Takayasu will stick around for a while if his injury heals as he’s still one of the better wrestlers right now. He just seems to have terrible luck.

I like Kotoeko but I don’t think he’ll ever be consistently joi-jin. I’d put Daieisho and Ryuden up there first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, nelimw said:

When was the last playoff to determine a yusho?

Aki basho in September 2017. Harumafuji beat Goeido.after they both finished on 11-4.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Katooshu said:

September 2017, after a 2-3 start Harumafuji went 9-1 over the final 10 days and then beat Goeido in an 11-4 yusho playoff.

Oh, man. I remember that. I believe I snorted my 酒. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Tigerboy1966 said:

Aki basho in September 2017. Harumafuji beat Goeido.after they both finished on 11-4.

Wow, it's already been two years since that match? It was rather impressive. I thought the Kisensoato-Terunofuji play off might have been the most recent, but it was earlier in 2017.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Katooshu said:

September 2017, after a 2-3 start Harumafuji went 9-1 over the final 10 days and then beat Goeido in an 11-4 yusho playoff.

Not too long afterwards, karaoke happened.

And both cases are some of the most spectacular implosions by a rikishi in recent memory. 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to make out a favourite at this point but to me Asanoyama looks even better now than in his championship basho. And I'm already glad he got his kachikoshi. I know he is hardly at his level at the moment, but I would really like to see Yutakayama up there too and have a little rivalry going between those two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

As opposed to all those which start out with, say, two blokes smashing into each other’s chests? :-P

Enho's matches sometimes look more like judo than sumo ... there, I said it.:-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Midoriyama said:

They struggling more than I expected in makushita-joi. Struggling is probably a strong word but you know we probably all expected to see them in juryo by now 

I sure didn't... Upper makushita just ain't the cakewalk far too many people assume it to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mt fuji said:

I like Kotoeko but I don’t think he’ll ever be consistently joi-jin. I’d put Daieisho and Ryuden up there first.

Oh, yes, good shout on Daieisho. I’m one of those who describes him as underrated and overlooked, and there I go underrating and overlooking him. 

Edited by Eikokurai
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

Easy to claim, impossible to prove. Even a healthy Takayasu has garnered his share of improbable losses.

 

9 hours ago, lackmaker said:

A healthy Takayasu could be winning this tournament.

Just let me have my obvious bias already! (Laughing...)

 

But yes, you're both right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

Enho's matches sometimes look more like judo than sumo ... there, I said it.:-)

When you have to face rikishis who weigh from 20 kg to 125 kg. more than you do, you have to use uncoventional techniques to stay competitive.  If what you do looks more like judo than sumo and you stay within the rules of sumo, use of such techniques is perfectly okay.  I even came up with a name to describe them--"jumo". Enho seems to be performing them  quite well. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now