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Yubinhaad

Juryo Promotions for 2019 Nagoya

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Five promotions, four newcomers, one old shikona.

Debut:

Kotonowaka (琴ノ若, formerly Kotokamatani) - Sadogatake-beya - last basho Mk2e, 4-3
Ichiyamamoto - Nishonoseki - Mk3e, 5-2
Kizakiumi - Kise - Mk3w, 5-2
Ryuko - Onoe - Mk4e, 6-1

Return:

Takanofuji - Chiganoura - Mk2w, 7-0 Yusho


No sign of the intai list yet, but I can tell you that Soranoumi, Shunba and three-time Jonokuchi yusho winner Ikeru are among those calling it a day.

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5 hours ago, Yubinhaad said:

Ryuko - Onoe - Mk4e, 6-1

Kizakiumi - Kise - Mk3w, 5-2

Ryuukou is Onoe's nephew. Kizakiumi, who started at Sandanme tsukedashi, is Juryo Churanoumi's brother.

Edited by Kintamayama
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Kotokamatani is of course the son of ex-sekiwake Kotonowaka and is now adopting his father's shikona. I wonder how many father and son sekitori there have been. (Sadanoumi is another example right now.)

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1 hour ago, ryafuji said:

Kotokamatani is of course the son of ex-sekiwake Kotonowaka and is now adopting his father's shikona. I wonder how many father and son sekitori there have been.

And of course former sekiwake Kotonowaka is now Sadogatake-oyakata, boss of the heya of which the new Kotonowaka is a member. How often has a rikishi trained in his father's stable and inherited his father's shikona?

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41 minutes ago, RabidJohn said:

And of course former sekiwake Kotonowaka is now Sadogatake-oyakata, boss of the heya of which the new Kotonowaka is a member. How often has a rikishi trained in his father's stable and inherited his father's shikona?

Tochiazuma, Takanohana, Masuiyama

Edited by Faustonowaka
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Well, no surprises here.

 

But what comes rather unexpected is that we only have one shikona change among the first timers.

In Ichiyamamoto's case, his shisho might follow the pattern he used with Matsutani->Shohozan before (Makuuchi promotion).

Kizakiumi - surname + umi ... nothing out of the ordinary. I strongly believed we see a change here.

Ryuko ... well, we have Meisei. So why no Ryuko.

 

 

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The shikona change for the young Kotonowaka was always in the works, his father had announced it at the time he entered. Should he make Yokozuna he will become Kotozakura.

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9 minutes ago, WAKATAKE said:

The shikona change for the young Kotonowaka was always in the works, his father had announced it at the time he entered. Should he make Yokozuna he will become Kotozakura.

Papers say Ozeki.

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3 hours ago, Raishu said:

But what comes rather unexpected is that we only have one shikona change among the first timers.

Is it that unexpected? It used to be very rare for a rikishi not to adopt a formal shikona upon promotion to juryo but it seems to me to becoming much more of a thing to keep your own surname. But I have no data to back it up.

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1 hour ago, ryafuji said:

Is it that unexpected?

In a way, yes. Especially when we take a closer look at each case.

For example, it appeared to me, that Ichiyamamoto only served as a placeholder, because there is almost always a Yamomoto on the banzuke. Maybe to give his deshi an incentive, Nishonoseki denied him a formal shikona right away, so he had to earn it. This seems to happen frequently with very talented rikihi - examples could be Tamaki from Takasago (no Asa--shikona) or Tsukahara from Kasugano (no Tochi-shikona). But let's wait and see if the "Shohozan-rule" will apply here (from now on, I will be rooting for him to reach Makuuchi, so we can find out ;-)).

Kizakiumi was not able to use his surname, because his older brother had already picked it up for the banzuke (he would later become Churanoumi upon Juryo promotion). Therefore, a prefix or suffix was needed. In my dreamy imagination, I expected Kise-oyakata to come up with another Okinawa-related shikona, so both brothers had something to represent together (almost like the Onami brothers in Arashio).

Concerning Ryuko, I am not that surprised. The name represents a certain strength and it had been used as shikona before (Ryuko Seiho - former komusubi).

Like WAKATAKE remarked, Kotokamatani was the obvious pick, since his potential future name change had already been announced on the day of his arrival in Ozumo.

After all, 1 out of 4 still seems to be unusual - regarding the circumstances described above.

Quote

It used to be very rare for a rikishi not to adopt a formal shikona upon promotion to juryo but it seems to me to becoming much more of a thing to keep your own surname. But I have no data to back it up.

Well, it does not have any statistic relevance, but in May only 6 out of 70 sekitori used either their surname or first name (or parts of it) as shikona. I am not sure whether there are more rikishi these days, who like to keep their real name upon promotion, but we always had the Wajimas, Masuda(+yama)s, Kitaos, Kakizoes, Dejimas, Yamamoto(+yama)s or Shimotoris. I would imagine, sound and meaning have something to do with. By coincidence - if I remember correctly, Yamamotoyama is also the name of a famous tee company. So there came some publicity with it as well.

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35 minutes ago, Raishu said:

For example, it appeared to me, that Ichiyamamoto only served as a placeholder, because there is almost always a Yamomoto on the banzuke. Maybe to give his deshi an incentive, Nishonoseki denied him a formal shikona right away, so he had to earn it.


The press articles reveal that Ichiyamamoto's shikona was suggested by a former president of the sumo department at Chuo University, who felt that 9 kanji strokes was auspicious in some way. He has since passed away and Ichiyamamoto didn't want to change it yet. He will consider it if and when he reaches a higher level.

That aside, it's great to see Nishonoseki-oyakata looking well and happy after his accident a while back.

D7tL4MBXYAEVnmO.jpg

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20 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

That aside, it's great to see Nishonoseki-oyakata looking well and happy after his accident a while back.

D7tL4MBXYAEVnmO.jpg

It's quite rare to see so much genuine happiness in one picture. :-D

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Just in the last few years (2016 forward), Yutakayama, Hokutofuji, and Takakeisho changed their shikona only upon reaching Makuuchi, while there's Yago, Ura, and Ishiura who kept their surnames, and Meisei who kept his given name.  Only Tsurugisho, Asanoyama, Shimanoumi, Daiamami, Churanoumi, and Tobizaru changed their shikona upon reaching Juryo away from their surnames.  Takanosho also changed his shikona, but it already was not his surname.  So it was only 6/13 prior to this basho in recent years.  1/4 isn't too bad, especially considering the three that didn't change didn't just have their bare surnames for shikona - one has a prefix, one a suffix, and one uses his given name.  The last one is 1/2 in these 3ish years, with Hokutofuji originally going by his given name as well as Meisei.  I don't think we've recently had any others that had shikona based on their surnames that weren't merely their surnames.  Plenty others exist and have existed - they just don't usually reach Juryo with those names (Kotoeko for example, who debuted before the period I was looking at anyway).

 

Edited by Gurowake
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15 hours ago, ryafuji said:

Kotokamatani is of course the son of ex-sekiwake Kotonowaka and is now adopting his father's shikona. I wonder how many father and son sekitori there have been. (Sadanoumi is another example right now.)

Lists of father and son sekitori were in the papers

PK2019053002100061_size0.jpgo

Edited by Akinomaki
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And in English/romaji, stolen as always from old Kyokai banzuke topics (the 2010.07 edition in this case):

(Table 2) Father-Son Sekitori

  Father Sekitori
Debut
Top Rank Son Sekitori
Debut
Top Rank
1 Kagamiiwa 11/1801 K. Kagamiiwa 1/1826 M. #8
2 Isenohama 1/1884 M. #3 Isenohama 5/1905 O.
3 Masuiyama 1/40 O. Masuiyama 7/69 O.
4 Jindachi
(Kenryu)
3/53 J. #1 Daishin
(Ozutsu)
7/77 S.
5 Kakureizan
(Tsurugamine)
5/52 S. Kakureizan 7/81 J. #2
Fukuzono
(Sakahoko)
7/81 S.
Genjiyama
(Terao)
7/81 S.
6 Oginohana 5/57 S. Oginohana 7/89 M. #2
Oginishiki 11/91 K.
7 Hanada
(Takanohana I)
3/68 O. Wakahanada
(Wakanohana III)
3/90 Y.
Takahanada
(Takanohana II)
11/89 Y.
8 Tochiazuma 5/65 S. Tochiazuma 5/96 O.
9 Matsumura
(Sadanoumi)
3/78 K. Sadanoumi 7/10 (J. #14)


Edit: DB links added.

Edited by Asashosakari
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2nd generation is plain and clear - the papers just say 3rd generation sekitori is very rare, but neither say first ever nor who of the 10 above might  have had a maternal grandfather as seikitori, which usually means: which other of the fathers married the daughter of an oyakata.

Edited by Akinomaki

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The 4 freshmen on the 4th at the sumo training institute had the introduction course for new sekitori: Kabutoyama- and Nishikijima-oyakata instructed them to be ready for Nagoya, including the dohyo-iri movements with a 15min. explanation video.  http://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201906040000405.html

Kizakiumi, Ichiyamamoto, Kotonowaka, Ryuko

201906040000405-w1300_0.jpg

D8MenLEUIAEZiet.jpg:thumbo D8MedAzUEAAALOY.jpg:thumbo

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