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ryafuji

Ex-Kurohimeyama passes away

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Apologies if this has been posted elsewhere already. Ex-sekiwake Kurohimeyama died of pneumonia on April 25 at the age of 70. He fought for Tatsunami beya  and had a streak of 1065 consecutive makuuchi bouts. Two jun-yusho, eight sansho, six kinboshi. After retiring he coached at Tatsunami before branching out with his own Takekuma stable in 1999, although it folded after only five years in 2004. He reached 65 in 2013 and left the Kyokai (I guess that was just before the "come back for five years as a consultant" reforms.)

https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201904260000576.html

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Oh no! "Pudge face" has died. (A reference only my brother and late father would appreciate.)

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He spent the entire 70's decade as a 6-9 to 9-6 member of the joi meatgrinder.  He was a yusho-killer who was always a major hurdle for those who were looking for fame and fortune.

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Watching some of his bouts on Youtube really shows that they were much more relaxed about the tachiai then. His hands dont even get close to the dohyo

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8 hours ago, Bumpkin said:

Oh no! "Pudge face" has died. (A reference only my brother and late father would appreciate.)

 

Yoshikaze is “Mushface” to us and our friends. 

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His son was a rikishi too and his grandson is now in Sakaigawa Beya

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1 hour ago, John Gunning said:

His son was a rikishi too and his grandson is now in Sakaigawa Beya

Shikonas, please?

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10 hours ago, The Fat Cyclist said:

Watching some of his bouts on Youtube really shows that they were much more relaxed about the tachiai then. His hands dont even get close to the dohyo

They are still very relaxed about enforcing the "both hands on the dohyo" rule. There occasionally are efforts to strictly apply it to all rikishis, but they don't seem to last very long. If you want to see an example of how it should be done, look at Yoshikaze.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bumpkin said:

Shikonas, please?

Grandson is Tanakayama, son is Haguronada. Here he is with his grandson in 2016.

1a603c21cdcb414eb27b44a413c6f1ec.jpg

Edited by Katooshu
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Another sad loss, there have been quite a few recently.

 

Swami

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Katooshu said:

Grandson is Tanakayama, son is Haguronada.

Grandson Tanakayama at the shinjo shusse with a kesho mawashi of grandad Kurohimeyama

107219626.jpg

Edited by Akinomaki
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5 hours ago, sekitori said:

They are still very relaxed about enforcing the "both hands on the dohyo" rule. There occasionally are efforts to strictly apply it to all rikishis, but they don't seem to last very long. If you want to see an example of how it should be done, look at Yoshikaze.

It’s a lot better than it was though - by the late 70s and early 80s they were doing the tachi-ai from virtually a standing position. You never see that anymore. The mid 80s crackdown, which involved showing all the rikishi old film of Futabayama’s tachi-ai, definitely returned things much closer to the both fists on the ground rule. 

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He had two sons  in sumo, both of them in his own Takekuma Beya with Haguronada, the more successful of the two, reaching Makushita #51 and Hagurokuni Jonidan #34.

Haguronada

http://heyaaz.nagioff.com/2019/image/Rikishi/History/Haguronada_321.jpg

Hagurokuni

http://heyaaz.nagioff.com/2019/image/Rikishi/History/Hagurokuni_718.jpg

I wonder whether he formed his own stable in the hope that one day one of his sons would take over from him. It wasn't to be.

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3 hours ago, ryafuji said:

It’s a lot better than it was though - by the late 70s and early 80s they were doing the tachi-ai from virtually a standing position. You never see that anymore. The mid 80s crackdown, which involved showing all the rikishi old film of Futabayama’s tachi-ai, definitely returned things much closer to the both fists on the ground rule. 

Exactly my point thanks. Look at this video & neither wrestler makes any real effort to get even close to the ground.

 

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If a rule is not implemented, it should either be modified or removed altogether. The "both hands on the dohyo" rule should apply to everyone. Since it doesn't, my suggestion would be to change it to something than can be enforced--possibly "both hands close to the dohyo". If the gyoji feels that a rikishi has an unfair advantage at the tachiai by keeping his hands too high, he can call a matta and continue to do so until he feels that the rikishi is conforming to the rule. This new rule may not exactly be ideal, but it's a lot better than having one that is totally ignored and is constantly being broken.

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They both totally touched. Rikishi just had faster reflexes back then, because the power water was full of methamphetamines. 

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Posted (edited)

Today was the tsuya for ex-Kurohimeyama - at the Ryogoku Ekoin temple - with about 250 attending: 20 oyakata, riji and those obliged to him from the time in the jungyo department

D5ZkBtoUIAAXQr_.jpg:thumbo 201904300000931-w200_0.jpgo

grandson Tanakayama

201904300000931-w200_3.jpg

Hakkaku rijicho

o201904300000931-w200_2.jpgo

Jesse

 

201904300000931-w200_1.jpgo 20190430s00005000301000p_thum.jpgo b_12290110.jpgo

Edited by Akinomaki
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Sad for me that the rikishi from my youth are passing away.  "He-Me" beat all the Y/O in his day (even Taiho once) .   

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4 minutes ago, Washuyama said:

Sad for me that the rikishi from my youth are passing away.  "He-Me" beat all the Y/O in his day (even Taiho once) .   

Besides Jesse, how many are left?

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2 hours ago, Bumpkin said:

Besides Jesse, how many are left?

A few... But the number shrinks all too often...

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Today was the funeral service at the Ekoin temple.Grandson Tanakayama is in Sakaigawa-beya, oyakata and rikishi from the heya after yesterday at the tsuya attended again, sekitori with Goeido as the principal one. From the NSK riji Takashima, fuku-riji Hanakago and Izutsu, and Tokiwayama-oyakata - Kitanofuji and plenty of concerned people. As representative of the family of ex-Kurohimeyama, his eldest son, ex-makushita Haguronada held the funeral address. After the heya folded, as Takekuma-oyakata he was in Tomozuna-beya, and the now Oshima-oyakata with Tanakayama were among those carrying the coffin

His posthumous Buddhist name is 真行院 武山秀 道居士 - the actual name part in the middle is composed of kanji from his last myoseki Takekuma 武隈, his shikona 黒姫山 and his real first name Hideo 秀男

Oshima-oyakata and Tanakayama in the middle

201905010000478-w200_0.jpgo 201905010000478-w200_1.jpgo

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He suffered a cerebral infarction in March last year according to Tanakayama, although he was making progress in rehab afterwards. A couple of pictures I stumbled across:


Juryo debutants for the 1969 Haru basho, from left: Asahikuni, Kurohimeyama, Mienoumi.

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1971 Nagoya sansho winners, from left: Takanohana (Shukun-sho), Yoshinohana (Kanto-sho), Kurohimeyama (Gino-sho).

WkYc62SH_o.jpg


And an undated shot of Kurohimeyama working on the teppo pole in keiko. Due to his powerful tachiai he had the nickname 'degoichi' after the D51 steam locomotive.

Ks0ec8fr_o.jpg

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