Akinomaki

New Ozeki Takakeisho

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Posted (edited)

Takakeisho used the phrases: "To not bring shame on the name of ozeki, respecting the spirit of bushido, not forgetting the feeling of gratitude and compassion, I go on devoting myself to sumodo" (the path of sumo as part of bushido)

大関の名に恥じぬよう、武士道精神を重んじ、感謝の気持ちと思いやりを忘れず、相撲道に精進してまいります

with video: https://www.kobe-np.co.jp/news/sports/201903/0012185146.shtml

a_12185252.jpg

He said it all - and in one flow

18 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

Takakeisho wants to use a phase that's important for him. He checked the phrases used in the past, and very unlike Taka: "4 kanji terms are not everything." "Also the other phrases had wonderful words one for one."

Kyokai messengers were Dewanoumi with Nishiiwa

Edited by Akinomaki
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Hearty congratulations from the Swami!

 

Swami

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Posted (edited)

According to Otokonoyama's link (sorry, out of likes ;-( ), Takakeisho is the 6th fastest wrestler to rise to the rank of Ozeki (28 tournaments) and the ninth youngest ever Ozeki (22yrs 7mons 22days).  But apparently, he has the sole distinction of being the shortest ever Ozeki (in recent history, which according to their sample goes back to the 1990s)!  You know what that means?  Shortest ever Yokozuna (to be)!!!!!?!?!

Perhaps "shortest ever" was a stretch, but "cutest ever" might still be a possibility?

Edited by Amamaniac
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8 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

But apparently, he has the sole distinction of being the shortest ever Ozeki

That is really hard to believe given the history of ozumo.  Let's see if Enho can top that.  ;-)

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, robnplunder said:

That is really hard to believe given the history of ozumo.  Let's see if Enho can top that.  ;-)

A number of early Yokozuna are listed as being about the same height or even slightly shorter, but perhaps they’re excluded because they didn’t top out at Ozeki. One would assume that early Ozeki would be similar though.

For example: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidenoyama_Raigorō

Edit: The very first Ozeki I looked up was shorter than Takakeisho. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hitachiiwa_Eitarō

Maybe he’s the shortest of the modern era???

Edited by Eikokurai
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2 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

But apparently, he has the sole distinction of being the shortest ever Ozeki 

I thought Tochinoshin was the shortest ever Ozeki. 

(Sorry, too soon?)

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Takakeisho will go down in history as the "last Ozeki of the Heisei Era".  I'm sure it is not a major issue, but frankly, I would prefer to be the first Ozeki of a new era!

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1 minute ago, Amamaniac said:

Takakeisho will go down in history as the "last Ozeki of the Heisei Era".  I'm sure it is not a major issue, but frankly, I would prefer to be the first Ozeki of a new era!

If he has a long-standing ozeki career, in 12 years from now, people could refer to him as "the ozeki from another era". That is cool

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2 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

Takakeisho will go down in history as the "last Ozeki of the Heisei Era".  I'm sure it is not a major issue, but frankly, I would prefer to be the first Ozeki of a new era!

He gets to be both I feel. Officially promoted at the end of Heisei, but will make his first basho appearance in the new era.

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True enough, Nantonoyama and Eikokutai.  But actually, his Ozeki career will lose much of its significance, when not if (?) he becomes the first Yokozuna of the new era (the name of which is still secret)!

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5 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

True enough, Nantonoyama and Eikokutai.  But actually, his Ozeki career will lose much of its significance, when not if (?) he becomes the first Yokozuna of the new era (the name of which is still secret)!

Thinking about it, Tochinoshin could become the first Ozeki of the new era if he gets repromoted. That’s technically counted as a separate appearance at the rank.

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2 hours ago, Thorbjarn said:

I feel kind of bad, but I'd like photo / video evidence of this... 

Soon.

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5 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

Takakeisho will go down in history as the "last Ozeki of the Heisei Era".  I'm sure it is not a major issue, but frankly, I would prefer to be the first Ozeki of a new era!

Go for it. You've got my support.

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Interested to see how many of you feel that Takakeisho will eventually become a Yokozuna...

This maybe a fan in me talking but I think he will get it in 3-4 years if not sooner. There is some reasoning for that. In 4 years Taka will be 26 just entering his prime and the top guys will be probably out of the picture completely or old so regression gonna be expected. So there won´t be many in his way

Takayasu gonna be 33, Mitakeumi and Hokutofuji 30, Ichinojo 29 and the rest of current sanyaku 35+

Of course injuries happen and it´s not a sure thing but I think that we see Yokozuna Takakeisho in March 2023. I woudn´t be surprised if in by that tourney we see Hoshoryu and Naya in sanyaku ranks 

My fantasy banzuke of Haru 2023 :)

Takakeisho Y

Hoshoryu   O Ichinojo

 Mitakeumi O Takayasu

 Naya          S  Meisei

  Goeido      K Hokutofuji

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... such an overachieving feat given his age, stature, and one dimensional sumo style.  

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An overview of the tour Takakeisho made through the wide shows

Tokudane from 9:20h-949h was live till just when the messengers arrived - they could have continued in NonStop, but didn't.

HiruObi reported from 11:58h, Takakeisho was live at 0:13h, till 0:35h, Demon, Takaktoriki and Sugiyama kept on till 0:58h

Miyane(-ya) was personally on location, 1:52h-, 1:59h live with Takakeisho  till 2:20h (eating together)

Goody reported from 1:57h on, Takakeisho came to them at 2:22h, eating again, till 2:54h

GogoSmile reported from 2:40h, Takakeisho was live at 3:03h, till 3:23h

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1 hour ago, Midoriyama said:

Interested to see how many of you feel that Takakeisho will eventually become a Yokozuna...

This maybe a fan in me talking but I think he will get it in 3-4 years if not sooner. There is some reasoning for that. In 4 years Taka will be 26 just entering his prime and the top guys will be probably out of the picture completely or old so regression gonna be expected. So there won´t be many in his way

Takayasu gonna be 33, Mitakeumi and Hokutofuji 30, Ichinojo 29 and the rest of current sanyaku 35+

Of course injuries happen and it´s not a sure thing but I think that we see Yokozuna Takakeisho in March 2023. I woudn´t be surprised if in by that tourney we see Hoshoryu and Naya in sanyaku ranks 

My fantasy banzuke of Haru 2023 :)

Takakeisho Y

Hoshoryu   O Ichinojo

 Mitakeumi O Takayasu

 Naya          S  Meisei

  Goeido      K Hokutofuji

Like robnplunder, I have my reservations about Takakeisho's chances to become a Yokozuna, but given the "history" of sumo, I am being swayed to the "he can do it" camp.

Loved your fantasy banzuke for Haru 2023!  I'm betting on Hoshoryu like you, but when I see his name beside (nay, atop) the likes of Ichinoji, Mitakeumi, and Takayasu, I tell myself that he really needs to put on some more weight... a lot more weight!

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Back in my first stint of watching sumo (on C4 in the UK in the late 80s and early 90s), a very powerful young oshi specialist appeared in makuuchi. He was capable of beating everyone, and did, but unlike Takakeisho he was very tall, rather top heavy and quite easily unbalanced by yotsuzumo. The commentators were of the opinion that he was a one-trick pony, and sekiwake was his likely ceiling.

C4 stopped showing sumo after the London koen in 1991, and this was well before the Internet, so it was only by chance in around 1995 that I discovered the tall, top-heavy and unstable young Hawaiian, whose shikona was Akebono, had become a yokozuna...

I was one of those who thought it unlikely that Takakeisho would ever make ozeki, yet here we are. I'm glad I didn't vow to eat something I shouldn't if it happened! Never say never, and all that.

The fact of the matter is Takakeisho isn't just on track to getting the rope, he's on track to becoming a dai-yokozuna! Ozeki at his age is pretty much a prerequisite for that. Does anyone here honestly believe he and his oyakata are unaware of that statistical fact?

Does anyone here believe that Takakeisho and his oyakata are unaware of his serious need to stop becoming a helplessly wriggling tadpole as soon as someone grabs his mawashi? His youth gives him the time to work on that, to develop and maybe experiment a bit. After all, he's done the hard part and now only needs to KK every other basho to retain his rank.

He needs to expand his range of technique, as Akebono did before him, but I can't help thinking Takakeisho getting the rope is now more likely than not.

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Positive predictions regarding the future of any rikishi should always contain the words "barring injury". Example--Tochinoshin who won his first yusho, looked great doing it, and was promoted to ozeki. He then got hurt and he's never been the same. He'll be a sekiwake in May. An even worse scenario applies to Kisenosato who also won his first yusho, was promoted to yokozuna, immediately won his second one and then---disaster. And what about Terunofuji and Baruto who had extremely promising futures at one time? They are just a few of many. 

I keep thinking of what Endo might have become without an ACL injury  that was allowed to improperly heal on its own without surgery, thereby weakening it permanently. With successful surgery, would he have reached the very high echelons that many people were predicting for him? Who knows? But he definitely would be more successful than he is now. 

There have been countless rikishis whose careers were either slowed or stopped completely because they got hurt. I can only hope that Takakeisho (or any other rikishi for that matter), never becomes the victim of a severe injury.  But they're playing a very difficult game against very strong people and injury, often career hindering and sometimes career ending, unfortunately happens to be a part of it---a very big part of it. :-(

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11 hours ago, Nantonoyama said:

If he has a long-standing ozeki career, in 12 years from now, people could refer to him as "the ozeki from another era". That is cool

Following his promotion ceremony, when asked what kind of Ozeki he wants to be, he replied something to the effect of, "It's not about what kind of Ozeki I'll be, there's one more level above and that's where I'm setting my sights next." 

If it all goes according to his plan, Takekeisho won't have a long-standing Ozeki career. 

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, sekitori said:

Positive predictions regarding the future of any rikishi should always contain the words "barring injury". Example--Tochinoshin who won his first yusho, looked great doing it, and was promoted to ozeki. He then got hurt and he's never been the same. He'll be a sekiwake in May. An even worse scenario applies to Kisenosato who also won his first yusho, was promoted to yokozuna, immediately won his second one and then---disaster. And what about Terunofuji and Baruto who had extremely promising futures at one time? They are just a few of many. 

I keep thinking of what Endo might have become without an ACL injury  that was allowed to improperly heal on its own without surgery, thereby weakening it permanently. With successful surgery, would he have reached the very high echelons that many people were predicting for him? Who knows? But he definitely would be more successful than he is now. 

There have been countless rikishis whose careers were either slowed or stopped completely because they got hurt. I can only hope that Takakeisho (or any other rikishi for that matter), never becomes the victim of a severe injury.  But they're playing a very difficult game against very strong people and injury, often career hindering and sometimes career ending, unfortunately happens to be a part of it---a very big part of it. :-(

He seems to have a grounded, controlled style and sturdy build that both bode well for minimizing the risk of injury, as opposed to, say, the wild, high-flying Chiyonokuni, but when it comes to sumo, a career-altering injury is always just one bad fall away and can occur at any time (Kisenosato, Ternofuji, Ura, et al).

Edited by Kaninoyama

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