Akinomaki

New Ozeki Takakeisho

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When does talk begin about someone's potential to make yokozuna? As soon as they become ozeki(if not sooner).

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1 hour ago, RabidJohn said:

 

I agree with Katooshu that Takakeisho doesn't need to develop much of a yotsu game. His stumpy little arms aren't suited for it. However, he does need to develop a reaction other than panic (which is how it always comes across to me) when someone gets his belt. Maybe a maemitsu grip combined with gaburiyori could serve him well. We shall see...

 

We shall see, indeed.   

Most professional athletes do not develop a new major skill once past age 20 or so. Before some of you jump all over this, of course, there are exceptions.  Some turned their professional career around with a new skill learned after 20, or even after 30.  But I have not seen much of that "exception" in sumo.    Can Takakeisho be one of the exceptions to learn another major skill in his arsenal to get him to the Yokozuna level?   I personally don't think so unless he can grow his reach by several inches.   And I heard that's not possible even with modern medical technology (Sigh...).     And I don't think getting bulkier will help Takakeisho to win more.  He looks like he is already carrying the most effective weight as is.   

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Of course there are exceptions even in sumo. Asashoryu did a lot of pushing and tsuppari before he made Yokozuna and was forced  to adopt a belt game when he was promoted.

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1 hour ago, Naganoyama said:

 Asashoryu did a lot of pushing and tsuppari before he made Yokozuna and was forced  to adopt a belt game when he was promoted.

Asashoryu was an amazing athlete. While he was able to adopt yotsu-zumo techniques and perform them very effectively, I doubt if the vast majority of rikishis (including Takakeisho) could even begin to do anything like that. He was  an extreme exception to the rule that rikishis can't develop new tecniques--and master them to the degree that he did. While Takakeisho may be an excellent rikishi, he's not close to being the athlete that Asashoryu was. Very few people are. 

Edited by sekitori
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7 hours ago, robnplunder said:

Most professional athletes do not develop a new major skill once past age 20 or so.

That's not true at all. Many baseball pitchers develop additional out pitches in midcareer, and it's very common for NFL players to move to a different position between university and the pros. MMA fighters who don't have a ground game develop one, and so forth. It's far, far more than "some exceptions."

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2 hours ago, Sue said:

That's not true at all. Many baseball pitchers develop additional out pitches in midcareer, and it's very common for NFL players to move to a different position between university and the pros. MMA fighters who don't have a ground game develop one, and so forth. It's far, far more than "some exceptions."

Many baseball pitchers? NFL players?  For every success story, I'd wager there are far more failure stories whom we don't even know their names.    Far, far more.   Can Takakeisho defy the odd?   Can Shodai ever learn another tachihai technique that can change his ozumo prospect?    Will see.

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4 hours ago, Churaumi said:

Or Abi? If anyone needs a new tachi-ai it’s him.

Abi needs to do some arm curls. Has there ever been an upper-level rikishi with arms as skinny as his?

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Does anyone here thinks Takakeisho can benefit from more weight?   Personally, I think he is at most effective weight.  

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9 minutes ago, robnplunder said:

Does anyone here thinks Takakeisho can benefit from more weight?   Personally, I think he is at most effective weight.  

I would say definitely not. It would likely slow him and limit his mobility.

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As he tried to get back on track after his first kyujo Haru 2018, Takakeisho was introduced to a personal trainer. What then changed was "the way he used his brain". He made him put into words the meaning of what he had done intuitively till then. This way it got easier to reproduce these feats and get rid of ups and down in his mood. Before the bout: heel scrubbing, slapping his mawashi, a lick at the salt, exhaling - each action has a reason. "Rather than getting taught something new, I got scientific explanations for what I learned from my former teachers."

With the help of this trainer, he made it from m10 to ozeki in one year. Room for growth was in his core, the abdomen - he hadn't made full and proper use of this center point for kicking and upper body movements.  Not his muscle mass increased, he made better use of it: "I learned the secret of how to activate the network of cerebral nerves that control the movements and thus reached a stable way to exhibit power." http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/news/2019/03/30/gazo/20190329s00005000490000p.html

with his personal trainer

20190329s00005000490000p_thum.jpg

 

19 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

Takakeisho today was home in Ashiya and was appointed hometown ambassador

The city  made him their first such PR ambassador

b_12194061.jpgo

Yesterday on Miyane-ya 3:14-3:37h

Edited by Akinomaki
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On 27/03/2019 at 19:34, Midoriyama said:

Interested to see how many of you feel that Takakeisho will eventually become a Yokozuna...

This maybe a fan in me talking but I think he will get it in 3-4 years if not sooner. There is some reasoning for that. In 4 years Taka will be 26 just entering his prime and the top guys will be probably out of the picture completely or old so regression gonna be expected. So there won´t be many in his way

Takayasu gonna be 33, Mitakeumi and Hokutofuji 30, Ichinojo 29 and the rest of current sanyaku 35+

I begrudgingly agree.  I don't think Takakeisho's sumo is particularly intelligent, nor reflects the versatility/breadth of technique that I would personally like to see in a yokozuna.  But it's not up to me.  However, it would seem he has the perfect convergence of age and timing insofar as the top tier being on the wane so yushos may be there for the taking and it would be hard for the YDC to argue what with the Kisenosato precedent.

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11 hours ago, robnplunder said:

Does anyone here thinks Takakeisho can benefit from more weight?   Personally, I think he is at most effective weight.  

Hes blowing back Takayasu very effectively. Someone who's a big banger. Takakeishou needs the speed, he's at the right weight IMO 

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Shin Ozeki Takakeisho mounted a dohyo for the first time since his promotion today and did his first sanyaku soroibumi as an Ozeki at the Ise Grand Shrine (one of the most important Shinto sanctuaries in Japan located in the Mie prefecture). A makuuchi tournament was held and the cheers were raining although he lost in the first round. "I'm starting to come back to earth, I have to gambarize more" he said. The name of the new era will be announced tomorow (April 1rst). "I was born during Heisei so it'll be the first time I experience the change of an era. I want to start well and strong" declared the 22 years old Ozeki

https://www.nikkansports.com/m/battle/sumo/news/201903310000813_m.html?mode=all

Edited by Rainoyama
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The NSK with other videos today also published one for Takakeisho's ozkei promotion

Edited by Akinomaki
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More enlightening stuff from Chris Gould:

 

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On 30/03/2019 at 22:04, Philioyamfugi said:

Hes blowing back Takayasu very effectively. Someone who's a big banger. Takakeishou needs the speed, he's at the right weight IMO 

The 6-3 record in Takayasu’s favour, all fought since July 2017, suggests otherwise. Takakeisho won their most recent bout, but Takayasu won the previous three.

Edited by Eikokurai

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Takakeisho - Mitakeumi 0-5. 

5 in a row! Not good for a good ozeki. 

I'm worried about our new ozeki. 

Edited by Qwerry

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15 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

The 6-3 record in Takayasu’s favour, all fought since July 2017, suggests otherwise. Takakeisho won their most recent bout, but Takayasu won the previous three.

Well i think we have seen a rise in Takakeisho. ..remember his first match with Hakahou, arms spread and waiting for him like Jesus. .. not such a pushover now...great exciting matches coming up with both these guys 

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41 minutes ago, Philioyamfugi said:

Well i think we have seen a rise in Takakeisho. ..remember his first match with Hakahou, arms spread and waiting for him like Jesus. .. not such a pushover now...great exciting matches coming up with both these guys 

I agree that Takakeisho has stepped up. The past year he has been on a steep learning curve. But, I don’t think he yet has the edge over any of the sanyaku guys, bar Tochinoshin whose injured knees have been unable to withstand Takakeisho’s barrage. 

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14 hours ago, Qwerry said:

Takakeisho - Mitakeumi 0-5. 

5 in a row! Not good for a good ozeki. 

I'm worried about our new ozeki. 

No worries.  Takakeisho has a slight winning record against all the sanyukus in the last few bashos Takakeisho was on the Ozeki run.   Things will balance out for Takakeisho as he matures in the new rank.

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38 minutes ago, robnplunder said:

No worries.  Takakeisho has a slight winning record against all the sanyukus in the last few bashos Takakeisho was on the Ozeki run.   Things will balance out for Takakeisho as he matures in the new rank.

He does if we include wins against an injured Kisenosato and the one-basho Komusubi (Kaisei, Myogiryu and Hokutofuji). Against the Y/O and sanyaku regulars (Mitakeumi, Tamawashi and Ichinojo) it’s already pretty balanced. Over the last four basho, when he’s been on his Ozeki run(s), his records are:

Mitakeumi 4-0 Takakeisho 

Tamawashi* 1-3 Takakeisho

Ichinojo* 1-3 Takakeisho

Takayasu 3-1 Takakeisho 

Goeido 3-1 Takakeisho 

Tochinoshin 0-4 Takakeisho 

Kakuryu 1-1 Takakeisho 

Hakuho 2-1 Takakeisho 

 

Aite 15-14 Takakeisho 

 

The * indicates that the number includes one bout with Tamawashi in the joi and two bouts with Ichinojo in the joi.

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29 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

He does if we include wins against an injured Kisenosato and the one-basho Komusubi (Kaisei, Myogiryu and Hokutofuji). Against the Y/O and sanyaku regulars (Mitakeumi, Tamawashi and Ichinojo) it’s already pretty balanced. Over the last four basho, when he’s been on his Ozeki run(s), his records are:

True.   Takekeisho held his own against the sanyukus either way.  If he maintain his current level, he will be an average Ozeki.   If he wants to an yusho or two, make a run for Yoko status, he needs to have decisively winning record against the sanyukus.     For now, it's too much to ask for the young kid.   Let's see how he goes from here.

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On ‎28‎/‎03‎/‎2019 at 18:54, CT3* said:

Huge boxing fan here (the only sports I follow are boxing and sumo) and I pretty much agree with everything stated here. Tyson was actually slipping before the Douglas fight. But his aura of invincibility was still intact and many of his opponents were mentally beaten before the fight even began. What his opponents did finally figure out was that the latter period Tyson was a bit of a frontrunner. If you stood up to him (like Douglas and Holyfield did) he'd start to mentally fold. Additionally, short and explosive fighters like Mike Tyson and David Tua typically have a somewhat short shelf life in boxing.

 

UFC  for me.....

Watch "Ruthless Robbie Lawler" fold in his match against fellow Southpaw "Nick Diaz."

The commentator just got done saying people where afraid to fight Lawler now.......  

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