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Akinomaki

New Ozeki Takakeisho

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My god, what a  a flurry of photographers' flashlights and TV cameras. Poor Takakeisho, this means that his every move will be analysed and taken into account now. A lot of pressure for a 22 year old. All the best for him.

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7 hours ago, robnplunder said:

... such an overachieving feat given his age, stature, and one dimensional sumo style.  

One dimensional like Mike Tyson. Bob and weave and throw bombs.

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Everything is relative. Whether a rikishi has what it takes to succeed as an Ozeki or rise even higher to Yokozuna, is in part down to the competition he faces. Takakeisho may not have a great belt game, but then again, does his competition in his age bracket? Not so much. There are a few who are halfway decent, but the emerging generation seem to favour oshi sumo – Abi, Onosho, Hokutofuji, etc – and that plays to Takakeisho’s strengths. Even the yotsu guys aren’t that proficient and once the experienced pros like Hakuho and Kakuryu retire, the field will be much weaker as I see it. Takakeisho only needs to be better than the rest, not better in the all-time historical rankings.

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11 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

One dimensional like Mike Tyson. Bob and weave and throw bombs.

And once Douglas beat him, Tyson's career had a free fall.   Everyone figured out how to beat Tyson it seems.   Hopefully, Takakeisho's career will not parallel Tyson's.

Hak reminds me of Ali. 

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1 hour ago, robnplunder said:

And once Douglas beat him, Tyson's career had a free fall.   Everyone figured out how to beat Tyson it seems.   Hopefully, Takakeisho's career will not parallel Tyson's.

Hak reminds me of Ali. 

By the time Douglas beat Tyson(And I don't wanna take anything away from Buster Douglas here! Douglas fought a hell of a fight that night!)Mike's years of training with Cus D'amato and Kevin Rooney were far behind him. It was D'amato's training that turned Tyson into a human buzzsaw, and after Cus' death and his seperation from Rooney, Tyson became complacent, arrogant, and just a little sloppy. The Tyson of 1990 just wasn't the finely tuned killing-machine that he had been in 1987.

After his stint in prison he was diminished still further. I don't think It was that people figured Mike out, since his style was pretty straightforward anyway*, it was that he just wasn't trying as hard anymore either in the gym or in the ring. It's the difference between a young man who didn't think he could be anybody until someone convinced him that he could be, and a man who'd achieved his dream and just wanted to enjoy being somebody. Besides brutal punching power, discipline was what helped Mike become champ, and it was lack of discipline that cost him the title.

*Very much like Floyd Patterson's had been, except that Mike was stockier and way more powerful. Not surprising, considering Patterson was also a Cus D'amato fighter.

Edited by Shio-kago
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1 hour ago, Shio-kago said:

By the time Douglas beat Tyson(And I don't wanna take anything away from Buster Douglas here! Douglas fought a hell of a fight that night!)Mike's years of training with Cus D'amato and Kevin Rooney were far behind him. It was D'amato's training that turned Tyson into a human buzzsaw, and after Cus' death and his seperation from Rooney, Tyson became complacent, arrogant, and just a little sloppy. The Tyson of 1990 just wasn't the finely tuned killing-machine that he had been in 1987.

After his stint in prison he was diminished still further. I don't think It was that people figured Mike out, since his style was pretty straightforward anyway*, it was that he just wasn't trying as hard anymore either in the gym or in the ring. It's the difference between a young man who didn't think he could be anybody until someone convinced him that he could be, and a man who'd achieved his dream and just wanted to enjoy being somebody. Besides brutal punching power, discipline was what helped Mike become champ, and it was lack of discipline that cost him the title.

*Very much like Floyd Patterson's had been, except that Mike was stockier and way more powerful. Not surprising, considering Patterson was also a Cus D'amato fighter.

That is a very good analysis.   I sure hope Takakeisho avoids all the pitfalls Tyson walked into.   Don't get complacent, don't be arrogant, don't be sloppy ....

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And like Iron Mike, he is separated from the coach that took him to new heights. Will Chiganoura-beya be able to support him as well as the former Takanohana-beya?

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5 hours ago, robnplunder said:

And once Douglas beat him, Tyson's career had a free fall.   Everyone figured out how to beat Tyson it seems.   Hopefully, Takakeisho's career will not parallel Tyson's.

 

But before Douglas beat him (and the rape and prison etc) he was the scariest guy to enter the ring since Foreman. I recently went back and watched some of those early Tyson fights and he was terrifying. And he successfully defended the heavyweight championship nine times which is better than most. The Yokozuna I would most compare Tyson to was Asashoryu...

But you're right, Hak is Ali. No question.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Otokonoyama said:

And like Iron Mike, he is separated from the coach that took him to new heights. Will Chiganoura-beya be able to support him as well as the former Takanohana-beya?

Well he both won his first yusho and became an Ozeki after joining Chiganoura-beya, so the signs point to yes.

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7 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Everything is relative. Whether a rikishi has what it takes to succeed as an Ozeki or rise even higher to Yokozuna, is in part down to the competition he faces. Takakeisho may not have a great belt game, but then again, does his competition in his age bracket? Not so much. There are a few who are halfway decent, but the emerging generation seem to favour oshi sumo – Abi, Onosho, Hokutofuji, etc – and that plays to Takakeisho’s strengths. Even the yotsu guys aren’t that proficient and once the experienced pros like Hakuho and Kakuryu retire, the field will be much weaker as I see it. Takakeisho only needs to be better than the rest, not better in the all-time historical rankings.

And then there's the mental game. Hakuho's mental toughness is unparalleled, but early signs point to Takekeisho also being a mentally tough competitor. 

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8 hours ago, robnplunder said:

And once Douglas beat him, Tyson's career had a free fall.   Everyone figured out how to beat Tyson it seems.   Hopefully, Takakeisho's career will not parallel Tyson's.

Hak reminds me of Ali. 

Short, strong and loves exploding forward. Takakeisho will become the Smokin' Joe Frazier of sumo.

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Shin Ozeki Takakeisho was back his home prefecture of Hyogo today. He recharged his batteries with french cuisine at the fancy restaurant "Maison de Taka Ashiya" located in Ashiya city. His parents and 19 reprensentatives from the city were present to celebrate his recent promotion. The japanese chef Mr.Takayama, who appently participated to major and global french cuisine tournaments, cooked a 16 500 yen course ( 150 USD, 135 euro ) for him.  He had abalones amongst other dishes.  " 'licious" uttered Takakeisho smaking his lips and beaming.     (Note he said 'おいしいっす' in japanese which is too funny too be translated imo but I tried my best for those who don't speak japanese). He went to that restaurant two times during the basho "When I eat good food it gives me energy" said Takakeisho. The cake was mounted with a rikishi wearing a rope "I want to aim for one rank higher in the banzuke next" (yokozuna) he declared and swore to visit the restaurant again next year as a Yokozuna.

He also paid a visit to Nishinomiya city City hall. The dohyo where he trained as a kid is in this city. "It was very nostalgic" said the young Ozeki.

https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/201903280000941.html

Edited by Rainoyama
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18 hours ago, Rainoyama said:

Shin Ozeki Takakeisho was back his home prefecture of Hyogo today. He recharged his batteries with french cuisine at the fancy restaurant "Maison de Taka Ashiya" located in Ashiya city. His parents and 19 reprensentatives from the city were present to celebrate his recent promotion.

He also paid a visit to Nishinomiya city City hall. The dohyo where he trained as a kid is in this city. "It was very nostalgic" said the young Ozeki.

in the restaurant

201903280000941-w200_0.jpgo201903290000112-w200_1.jpgo b_12190011.jpgo201903290000112-w200_0.jpgo 20190328-OHT1I50200-N.jpgo

b_12190495.jpgo sum19032905020002-m1.jpgo 20190328s00005000291000p_thum.jpgo

in the city hall

sum19032818350005-m2.jpgo

flowers

 b_12190491.jpgo

and a bottle of the local based Ozeki sake

20190328atG4S_t.jpgo s.jpgwst1903290010-n1.jpgo sum19032818350005-m1.jpgo 

Edited by Akinomaki
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4 hours ago, Kaninoyama said:

And then there's the mental game. Hakuho's mental toughness is unparalleled, but early signs point to Takekeisho also being a mentally tough competitor. 

Perhaps I'm not being sufficiently charitable, but I rather suspect it's less mental toughness and more a lack of deep mental activity. I don't get the sense that Takakeisho is someone who ponders much beyond his immediate circumstance. This probably allows him to avoid the sort of anxious anticipation that plagued Kisenosato over the years. 

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It's true he doesn't really have a belt game, but I think his oshi-sumo is the most multidimensional there is today. He has very good power coming forward at attacking straight on, he has very good timing with pivots that unbalance his opponents to the side or straight down to the dohyo, he's good with pulldowns and slapdowns, and for someone who attacks as hard as he does his stability is excellent. Watch his matches with Hokutofuji for example--both guys push hard but it's Takakeisho that pretty much always manages to stay firm on his feet.

How often do we see someone get a tight grip on his belt anyway? Even Hakuho had to really work hard for it in their last match and poor Tochinoshin hasn't been able to get close to it...

Now, I'm certainly not calling yokozuna, but I don't think he's as limited stylistically as often suggested, and I'm not really convinced that he needs to develop much of a yotsu game to rise even higher on the banzuke. He may have come around at just the right time with the yokozuna being up there in sumo age....

Edited by Katooshu
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13 hours ago, Shio-kago said:

By the time Douglas beat Tyson(And I don't wanna take anything away from Buster Douglas here! Douglas fought a hell of a fight that night!)Mike's years of training with Cus D'amato and Kevin Rooney were far behind him. It was D'amato's training that turned Tyson into a human buzzsaw, and after Cus' death and his seperation from Rooney, Tyson became complacent, arrogant, and just a little sloppy. The Tyson of 1990 just wasn't the finely tuned killing-machine that he had been in 1987.

After his stint in prison he was diminished still further. I don't think It was that people figured Mike out, since his style was pretty straightforward anyway*, it was that he just wasn't trying as hard anymore either in the gym or in the ring. It's the difference between a young man who didn't think he could be anybody until someone convinced him that he could be, and a man who'd achieved his dream and just wanted to enjoy being somebody. Besides brutal punching power, discipline was what helped Mike become champ, and it was lack of discipline that cost him the title.

*Very much like Floyd Patterson's had been, except that Mike was stockier and way more powerful. Not surprising, considering Patterson was also a Cus D'amato fighter.

Huge boxing fan here (the only sports I follow are boxing and sumo) and I pretty much agree with everything stated here. Tyson was actually slipping before the Douglas fight. But his aura of invincibility was still intact and many of his opponents were mentally beaten before the fight even began. What his opponents did finally figure out was that the latter period Tyson was a bit of a frontrunner. If you stood up to him (like Douglas and Holyfield did) he'd start to mentally fold. Additionally, short and explosive fighters like Mike Tyson and David Tua typically have a somewhat short shelf life in boxing.

As for Takakeisho? I hope he continues to do well. Right now, his explosiveness is one of his greatest assets. He's been in Sumo since a very young age, so I question whether he will be able to significantly add more wrinkles to his game at this point. We shall see.

I also think the Yokozuna talk is ridiculously premature. He's yet to have a single basho as an Ozeki and some are already pegging him to be a future Dai Yokozuna.

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Mmmm...Tyson...I don't know if he was "one dimensional"...He   was incredibly athletic, used to have a efficient offensive pendulum (you guys uses that word in english for boxing?) and was insanely quick and powerful with the combinations (again...im using brazilian boxing terminology here...). When i was training boxe in my 20s i used to (pathetically) emulate his combinations. elbow and all...hahaha. Anyway is hard to tell the real status of Mike's boxe those times because he really did not faced any real deal (wakawaka).

 

Now Sato...Thats a tough one... definitely one dimensional...Kind of a dwarf...much relies on the tachiai (at least to his "easy wins, and to be regular on results you have to count with some "easy wins" per basho) and that first push from low (wich can be study and evoid). I don't know if someone can hold Ozeki rank or be Zuna with no skills, i mean 0, at mawashi...

Bububut, He does have Yokozuna numbers to his age. He is a great oshier and his low gravity center  is hard to deal with. Hes mentally strong and fearless.

I just can't tell if he will be a falling or a super star. Anyway little mf* already make history at this point. Banzai to him.(Clappingwildly...)

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1 hour ago, CT3* said:

I also think the Yokozuna talk is ridiculously premature. He's yet to have a single basho as an Ozeki and some are already pegging him to be a future Dai Yokozuna.

Agreed.  A number of things need to happen before Takakeisho fans can mention Yoko & Taka in same sentence.   Taka needs to grow longer arms, and learn yotsu sumo ;-).

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21 hours ago, RabidJohn said:

The fact of the matter is Takakeisho isn't just on track to getting the rope, he's on track to becoming a dai-yokozuna! Ozeki at his age is pretty much a prerequisite for that. Does anyone here honestly believe he and his oyakata are unaware of that statistical fact?

Most dai-yokozuna may have reached ozeki while very young, but far from everyone who reached ozeki while very young became a dai-yokozuna. So far he's just as much "on track" to be the next Kashiwado, Onokuni, Chiyotaikai, Kotooshu or Miyabiyama. (In roughly decreasing career success; all became ozeki at 22 or in Kashiwado's case even at 21. And that's less than half the number of names that I could list.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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He's only 22.  Going to be fun watching him grow. Right now , he is a like young Mike Tyson. He can do a lot with that body.  He got what he earned. He's in charge of keeping it. 

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2 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Most dai-yokozuna may have reached ozeki while very young, but far from everyone who reached ozeki while very young became a dai-yokozuna. So far he's just as much "on track" to be the next Kashiwado, Onokuni, Chiyotaikai, Kotooshu or Miyabiyama. (In roughly decreasing career success; all became ozeki at 22 or in Kashiwado's case even at 21. And that's less than half the number of names that I could list.)

I think he’d be happy to become another Ōnokuni, who did after all take the rope, even if his Yokozuna tenure was injury-riddled and relatively unexceptional (not unlike Kisenosato’s in many ways actually). He’d be very happy to become another Kashiwado.

Edited by Eikokurai
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11 hours ago, Katooshu said:

Now, I'm certainly not calling yokozuna, but I don't think he's as limited stylistically as often suggested, and I'm not really convinced that he needs to develop much of a yotsu game to rise even higher on the banzuke. He may have come around at just the right time with the yokozuna being up there in sumo age....

The important thing is that Takakeisho is highly effective with what he has & does.   That in itself is amazing given his size handicap.

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12 hours ago, CT3* said:

I also think the Yokozuna talk is ridiculously premature. He's yet to have a single basho as an Ozeki and some are already pegging him to be a future Dai Yokozuna.

Takakeisho himself is talking about being a yokozuna next year, so there's nothing ridiculous or premature about us discussing the possibility here, and I merely drew attention to the statistical fact that getting to ozeki at such a young age mirrors the path taken by most of the dai-yokozuna. However, as Pierre pointed out, not everyone who gets on that track ends up in the same place.

I agree with Katooshu that Takakeisho doesn't need to develop much of a yotsu game. His stumpy little arms aren't suited for it. However, he does need to develop a reaction other than panic (which is how it always comes across to me) when someone gets his belt. Maybe a maemitsu grip combined with gaburiyori could serve him well. We shall see...

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