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Haru Basho 2019 Discussion [SPOILERS]

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2 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

"It's a bit better. I can move it," said Hakuhou at the press conference today. He still can't bend it and was drinking using his left hand and will decide if he will be joining the jungyo (March 30th) after 3-4 days of rest and has no intention of going to the hospital at his point. "I can understand how Kisenosato felt," he said. So at this point, there is no official diagnosis, just Hakuhou's feeling.

 

I don’t like this. I thought Hakuhō would be smart enough to get all necessary treatment ASAP and rest as much as needed, especially after the Kisenosato fiasco. What is he doing?

I’m relieved the injury doesn’t seem to be career-ending like Kisenosato’s, but he needs to get treated and take off the whole year if needed.

As far as the guy saying Hakuhō faked the injury– obviously the lack of “likes” on the post shows what the forum thinks of it, and I (as mentioned by others) would rather ignore such preposterous claims than clutter the forum with arguments.

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13 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

Wonder who is going to clean up if Hakuho does end up sitting 3 out.

Eventually we see the rise of Yokozuna Goeido!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

"It's a bit better. I can move it," said Hakuhou at the press conference today. He still can't bend it and was drinking using his left hand and will decide if he will be joining the jungyo (March 30th) after 3-4 days of rest and has no intention of going to the hospital at his point. "I can understand how Kisenosato felt," he said. So at this point, there is no official diagnosis, just Hakuhou's feeling.

 

John Hamm, raising the injured arm:

sum19032511410009-p1.jpg

You can clearly see, that he rises his shoulder too and lend his head to this side. If he "only" could not bend his right arm, lifting should not such a problem. But it seems it is.

 

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4 minutes ago, Tsubame said:

You can clearly see, that he rises his shoulder too and lend his head to this side. If he "only" could not bend his right arm, lifting should not such a problem. But it seems it is.

Sorry, but that's rubbish. A man is not a robot, you know?

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5 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

Sorry, but that's rubbish. A man is not a robot, you know?

Given a certain sportiness: Go in front of a mirror, lift your angled arm, watch wether you rise your shoulder and tilt your head too or not.

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I do.

Edit: and to elaborate a bit further - if you're hurting, every movement will subconsciously try to levy that pain, so it's not unusal that Hakuho tilts his head in anticipation of pain, even if it's "only" the biceps that hurts.

Edited by Jakusotsu

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9 hours ago, Jabbamaru said:

some of you guys talks about sumo appreciation like its some kind of fine taste...well...To me is more like a guilty pleasure...i know, i know...Sumo brings all that fine japanese/shinto aesthetics, and its really stunning visually...But the essence are two not so bright fellows  smashing each other...i mean come on...its not poetry, literature, philosophy or even archery (yaaaay ichi; gambateeeee mfk!!!) or chess to stays on the sports session... you ain't find no Capablanca, no zen master,  on ozumo...no one needs to be offended by no ones lack of gentlemansnesses here...

(Bow...)

To be honest I don't agree at all. Something being violent doesn't automatically rob it of aesthetic value. And sumo, while brutal and physical, ultimately is more than just two big guys smashing into each other, otherwise the biggest guys would always win. I'm not a Hakuho fan, but I think he demonstrated that quite ably this basho. His physical abilities are starting to fail him, but his mental and strategic skills aren't. There were multiple bouts where his opponent had him in a bad position, but his timing and split-second decision making was what made the difference, and led him to the zensho.

Ultimately it comes down to how much you want to get out of it. If you go in just wanting to see two huge guys smash each other, that's what you're going to see. But you shouldn't assume that everyone just sees exactly what you do.

It's funny you should bring up chess, because I used to follow the chess world a fair bit (not so much these days) and I'll tell you this; for all the reputation of chess players as intellectual types, there is far more lying, backstabbing, politics, scandal, bullying and omerta mentality in the chess world than the sumo world could dream of.

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I really do not want to deviate, but I can‘t resist: my money‘s down that there were/are significantly less sumo masters who suffer from the effects of excessive alcohol intake during their careers than chess players. I also do not know a single sumo grandmaster who steadfastly claimed he wrestled a dead, like at least one chess grand champion did. Sorry, goodbye and see you in May.

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4 hours ago, ALAKTORN said:

I don’t like this. I thought Hakuhō would be smart enough to get all necessary treatment ASAP and rest as much as needed, especially after the Kisenosato fiasco. What is he doing?

I’m relieved the injury doesn’t seem to be career-ending like Kisenosato’s, but he needs to get treated and take off the whole year if needed.

 

Strange. Hakuhó semms to me the kind of guy who is pragmatic enough to go to a proper doctor and have hmself treated, whatever it takes. He certainly woudn't want to transform into a Kisenosato-like walking injury.  

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10 minutes ago, Apayasu said:

Strange. Hakuhó semms to me the kind of guy who is pragmatic enough to go to a proper doctor and have hmself treated, whatever it takes. He certainly woudn't want to transform into a Kisenosato-like walking injury.  

I wonder if he's looking ahead to retirement, which has to come next year if not sooner, and thinking he wants to compete as much as possible while he still can rather than sit out a bunch of what will likely be his last active year.

I hope not, though. I would much rather see him at 100% condition than in the kind of condition we saw Kisenosato in at the end of his career.

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4 hours ago, Jaakunakunshu said:

I'm not a Hakuho fan, but I think he demonstrated that quite ably this basho. His physical abilities are starting to fail him, but his mental and strategic skills aren't. There were multiple bouts where his opponent had him in a bad position, but his timing and split-second decision making was what made the difference, and led him to the zensho.

Same, I'm not a fan of his, but his Takakeisho bout left me awestruck with appreciation of his timing and, frankly, brute strength.  The way he swatted Takakeisho's head and neck a couple of times with seemingly little effort, but successfully sweeping him to the side left me open-mouthed.  Takakeisho fought well but appeared utterly shocked by the onslaught of power.  Tochinishin tried the same swatting once or twice in his bout but lacked (i) the timing; and (ii) the sheer power and build.  

As to Hakuhou's injury, the level of immediate pain is not always an indicator as to seriousness.  Some injuries can burn like heck straight away but turn out to be low level and vice versa...which is exactly why one should see a doctor.  I don't know why he is delaying seeking medical attention - the sooner he gets a diagnosis and opinion on a treatment plan, the sooner he can actually begin productive healing.

  

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8 hours ago, ALAKTORN said:

I don’t like this. I thought Hakuhō would be smart enough to get all necessary treatment ASAP and rest as much as needed, especially after the Kisenosato fiasco. What is he doing?

I’m relieved the injury doesn’t seem to be career-ending like Kisenosato’s, but he needs to get treated and take off the whole year if needed.

This side of Sumo really puzzles me. 

A fast diagnosis prevents more serious consequences and/or speed up the recover. I do can't  understand especially for athlets of this level.

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After some wacko bashos this one felt like really "classic-styled" sumo. :-) I very much enjoyed watching your vids @Kintamayama , big thanks for top quality as usual. Happy for Takakeisho, sad for Tochinochin and I surely hope that one of my favs, Ikioi, takes a long break for proper recovery... :-(

May can't arrive too soon... 

2wwosd.jpg

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