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Otokonoyama

Setsubun 2019 Edition

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The Geek was at the Hie Shrine in Nagatacho, Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo to participate in the festivities.

 

 

Edited by Otokonoyama
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This dapper former yokozuna was at Ohkunitama Shrine in Fuchu, Tokyo.

 

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Takagenji

Takakeisho puts some pep in his throws.

And guy again, very yokozuna-like delivery.

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Takakento, Masunoyama, and Takamasaki

Wakaseiun and Takakento

Yuriki, hairdresser Tokosen, Masunoyama, Wakaseiun

Chiganoura guys at Fureai Plaza in Sakae Town in Chiba. Masunoyama is from Sakae.

Edited by Otokonoyama
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Hakuho was at Naritasan Shinso Temple in Chiba.

Brought Mitakeumi along.

Not to mention Okinoumi and Endo.

 

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Sumo wrestlers, actors toss beans at ‘setsubun’ festival in Narita

NARITA, Chiba Prefecture--Kabuki star Ichikawa Ebizo, yokozuna Hakuho and actors in a TV period drama threw beans during a ceremony at Naritasan Shinshoji temple here on Feb. 3 to pray for a bumper crop.

Scattering beans at “setsubun,” the last day of winter in the traditional lunar calendar, is a custom practiced at shrines, temples and homes. The bean tossing is believed to drive out demons and attract good fortune.

The temple prepared 860 kilograms of soy beans and 400 kilograms of unshelled peanuts for the bean-scattering ceremony.

About 60,000 visitors flooded the temple as setsubun fell on a warm and fine Sunday.

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201902030030.html

Edited by Otokonoyama
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I swear, the first time I saw those pink Gibson Flying V jackets in a video of a Setsubun several years ago, I thought the story was about an Osaka theater company's rendition of Rocky Horror Picture Show. (Thinkingindepth...)

There seems to be some variation in the type of Kataginu worn.  Do the style and color vary from shrine to shrine?

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So Groundhog Day is the 2nd and sorta is related to the same astronomical thing, being halfway between the solstice and the equinox.  But Setsubun is the 3rd.  Might this have something to do with the fact that Asia is over 12 hours ahead of America?  The astronomical point in time averages out to a different day in the two different parts of the world.   It looks like a blog that's the top hit for googling the two holidays together says that's the case.  http://estylekagawa.blogspot.com/2011/02/groundhog-day-vs-setsubun-and-coming.html

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The day setsubun is on moves a little bit, it seems to depend on leap years. Maybe over hundreds of years the average is about 12 hours ahead so it could be a right assumption.

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21 hours ago, Gurowake said:

So Groundhog Day is the 2nd and sorta is related to the same astronomical thing, being halfway between the solstice and the equinox.  But Setsubun is the 3rd.  Might this have something to do with the fact that Asia is over 12 hours ahead of America?  The astronomical point in time averages out to a different day in the two different parts of the world.   It looks like a blog that's the top hit for googling the two holidays together says that's the case.  http://estylekagawa.blogspot.com/2011/02/groundhog-day-vs-setsubun-and-coming.html

French-speaking part of Europe (basically France and some parts of Belgium and Switzerland) also celebrate Candelmas on feb 2nd. It is linked to the same mid-season stuff.

In Japan the season is centered on the equinox/solstice, so spring (Haru) has begun.

It is not straightforward to set a date for an event, given the way time was counted in the past and that time-arranging features (feb 29 in some years) implies that day and hour of astronomical solstices and equinoxes vary over time

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Hokutofuji as usual at the Chuusonji in Hiraizumi, Iwate

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Tamawashi with Kataonami-oyakata at the Takaosan Yakuou-in in Hachioji

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and at the Jindaiji in Chofu

 

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Futagoyama-beya at the Hitachi-no-kuni Soushaguu in Ishioka, Ibaraki

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brothers Hidenoumi and Tobizaru at the Kashima jingu

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Kaisei at the Kuon-ji in Minobu, Yamanashi

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Sadogatake with Kotoeko in Suzuka at the Tsubaki grand shrine

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Arawashi, Takayasu and Tagonoura in Tsuchiura at the Houshakuji o

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more from the others

Kise

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Goeido

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Takakeisho

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really another

Taka in Uji, Kyoto

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Edited by Akinomaki
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