specialweek 2

Kisenosato intai

Recommended Posts

"Even though it's very regrettable that I wasn't able to live up to everyone's expectations as a yokozuna, I don't regret one bit of my career on the dohyo. I feel like I couldn't have made it here on my own. I was supported by a lot of people and I remember the face of each person. I have nothing but extreme gratitude. I had practiced and gotten in shape before the tournament. I had a feeling inside like 'this is do or die' and I trained well. The result of that came in the form of three losses from opening day, and I don't have a single regret. Since the injury, I was confident that I was doing the best I could. I wrestled with everything I had in the world. But I felt for the first time that I was unable to go on. Whether or not I'm retiring with my head high, I've always thought about coaching. But while I've decided to continue on with sumo so I can support others, I'm sorry to have left a result like this."

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2019/01/ff24f2190779-sumo-kisenosatos-retirement-leaves-sport-without-japanese-grand-champion.html

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Otokonoyama said:

Whether or not I'm retiring with my head high, I've always thought about coaching. But while I've decided to continue on with sumo so I can support others,

Good to hear this from himself.

Kisenosato is dead, long live Araiso-Oyakata!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

His playoff win against Teronufuji was a classic. This was day after his injury and nobody expected him to return. He showed the heart of a Yokozuna. This is how he should be rembered. 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I can really add to what's already been said here.  It's a real shame, but was inevitable now. He was never going to be competitive (as in yusho-winning) again, but he at least proved himself with the two consecutive yusho when he was fit.  I hope he takes some time out to regroup and embraces his new role with gusto.  He cuts a slightly lonely figure, so being at the heart of a heya will be good for him in these circumstances.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long in coming only because Kisenosato wanted to keep fighting. He gave his life to sumo and gave us many years of quality performances. Far from being forgotten, he will serve as an inspiration to younger wrestlers as they seek to follow him to the top. I will always remain a Kisenosato fan.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Philioyamfugi said:

His playoff win against Teronufuji was a classic. This was day after his injury and nobody expected him to return. He showed the heart of a Yokozuna. This is how he should be rembered. 

It also costed his career. Such action, although heroic, should not be encouraged in sports. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Dapeng said:

It also costed his career. Such action, although heroic, should not be encouraged in sports. 

It was a freak accident that caused the injury. And the fact that he came back the next day, with one arm tied behind his back, and won two in a row against Terunofuji to clinch his back to back yusho is the stuff of legend: "I would rather be ashes than dust".

The decision not to undergo surgery to fix the tear was very bad though, and the rest of the "healing naturally" nonsense...

Edited by autotroph
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, autotroph said:

The decision not to undergo surgery to fix the tear was very bad though, and the rest of the "healing naturally" nonsense...

Sure. According to a peer-reviewed research article, the pec major rupture, if immediately repaired surgically, the strength can be effectively restored. He should have immediately gone under surgery instead of continuing fighting that had certainly aggravated the injury.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the longest intai press conference ever - and NeTele NNN covers it in full on their news channel:

"Not a thread of regret in my life on the dohyo"

of course all news and news show program today were full of the news of the day - only foreign fans who have only witnessed the last 2 years of his career will ever forget Kisenosato

Edited by Akinomaki
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

only foreign fans who have only witnessed the last 2 years of his career will ever forget Kisenosato

As a foreign fan who started following closely right after Hatsu 2017 I won't. And I will do my best to contextualize the whole tragedy surrounding Kisenosato for everyone who will forget him or try to put him down. It was very moving to watch the ordeal the Yokozuna went through, and while I had wished he would have gotten surgery (and later on... rather would have quit earlier), I still admire his effort and will to fight. Here is hoping he will find joy and fulfillment as an oyakata. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Dapeng said:

It also costed his career. Such action, although heroic, should not be encouraged in sports. 

 

4 hours ago, autotroph said:

It was a freak accident that caused the injury. And the fact that he came back the next day, with one arm tied behind his back, and won two in a row against Terunofuji to clinch his back to back yusho is the stuff of legend: "I would rather be ashes than dust".

The decision not to undergo surgery to fix the tear was very bad though, and the rest of the "healing naturally" nonsense...

 

4 hours ago, Dapeng said:

Sure. According to a peer-reviewed research article, the pec major rupture, if immediately repaired surgically, the strength can be effectively restored. He should have immediately gone under surgery instead of continuing fighting that had certainly aggravated the injury.  

Let's not forget, the situation was strikingly similar to Takanohana's: both won the yusho with an injury which ultimately led to their demise. The major difference: Takanohana went for surgery (in France, IIRC). Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Dapeng said:

Sure. According to a peer-reviewed research article, the pec major rupture, if immediately repaired surgically, the strength can be effectively restored. He should have immediately gone under surgery instead of continuing fighting that had certainly aggravated the injury.  

It's easier said than done for most athletes.   Unless their powers to be forced them to make the right medical decision, left alone to athletes, they will make the decision in favor of playing through.   Many athletes ruined their career doing that.   Some do it to not lose their position in the team.   Others do it b/c they are overconfident of their particular situation.   The taste of victory, win, etc., can be very addictive.   Put all these reasons together, athletes will make the wrong logical decision in regards to their injury.   Terunofuji and Ura come to my mind besides Kise.   Although Kise wouldn't lose his "spot" whereas Teru & Ura would lose their position while sitting out of on injury.  

Edited by robnplunder
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't really have time to write anything at the time of the initial announcement, so for what it's worth a few thoughts. 

I was never one of Kisenosato's fans. In fact, some years ago when he was more immature and tended to mess with other rikishi with his tachiai antics, I disliked him. A good example of one such bout with Kisenosato's tachiai antics and the result of it is here - 

 

 

However, as time passed and Kisenosato came to be the only real challenger to the Yokozuna, I slowly started to respect him. It is obvious that he loves sumo above all and works very hard to get results. This attitude and perseverance carried him to the very pinnacle of sumo, and for a short moment he could enjoy the fruits of his years of toiling. It is a tragedy that his well-earned Yokozuna career is cut so short and he won't be able to leave an even bigger mark on sumo than he already has. I sincerely hope that he'll be able to impart his experience on the following generations as a successful oyakata and perhaps even raise a Yokozuna himself. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As usual I avoided possible spoiler sources until I'd seen Moti's digest today, so it was with some relief that I saw the yobidashi step up with the banner while the announcer said "Yokozuna Kisenosato intai".

About bloody time! I thought, possibly a little uncharitably, but I really am just glad it's over.
Someone mentioned earlier that Kisenosato's life story would make a good biopic. I agree. It's got that cherry blossom symbolism of falling at the peak of perfection, which is pretty much exactly what happened to him in March 2017. Pity there doesn't seem to be a bird or two involved, as that would be a classic.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dingo said:

A good example of one such bout with Kisenosato's tachiai antics and the result of it is here - 

I've never seen that bout!  It's a shame that European rikishi are unable to act calm and disinterested; why, you can see that Baruto-smirk a mile away!;-)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/01/2019 at 19:00, Kaninoyama said:

I highly doubt he will fade into obscurity. He was immensely popular with Japanese fans, became the first Japanese Yokozuna in almost 20 years after heartbreaking struggle to attain that rank, conducted himself with impeccable "hinkaku" throughout his career, and will thus be remembered and revered as a Japanese sumo hero for many years to come. 

 

Yes, good point.  I was thinking along the lines of various records and fame on paper.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He just barely missed the top 10 longest Ozeki careers thanks to that untimely promotion.;-)

But he did get:

Most top division wins

  Name Wins Years Highest rank
1 Hakuhō 1001 2004– Yokozuna
2 Kaiō 879 1993–2011 Ōzeki
3 Chiyonofuji 807 1975–91 Yokozuna
4 Kitanoumi 804 1972–84 Yokozuna
5 Taihō 746 1960–71 Yokozuna
6 Kisenosato 714 2004–2019 Yokozuna

and

Most consecutive wins

  Name Wins[2] Start End Duration Defeated by
1 Futabayama 69 7 January 1936 3 January 1939 2 years, 11 months and 27 days Akinoumi
2 Tanikaze 63 1 October 1778 6 February 1782 3 years, 4 months and 5 days Onogawa
Hakuhō 63 14 January 2010 2 November 2010 9 months and 19 days Kisenosato
Edited by itchyknee
Search his name here for more: http://www.chijanofuji.com/Records.html
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Otokonoyama said:

 

This is pretty cool for the historical perspective it provides

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First job as Araiso-oyakata today for ex-Kisenosato - going around the NSK departments to introduce himself as oyakata newbie

GqxCtZ23QI4Q4qGu.jpg:thumbvid

s.jpg s.jpg sum19011715490019-m1.jpgo b_11986741.jpgo 20190117s00005000187000p_thum.jpgo

Edited by Akinomaki
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The NSK had a rijikai yesterday and acknowledged that Kisenosato took on the toshiyori name Araiso. Kyokai rules demand that he stays 1 year as heya attached oyakata before he can become independent and open a heya - and he may do so already for the Olympics. Since nearly 1 year ago he is looking for premises - somewhere between Akihabara and Asakusabashi station is seen as likely - not many sumo-beya there, but the AKB48 headquarters - it may turn out to be called AKB=Akiba-beya. http://www.hochi.co.jp/sports/sumo/20190116-OHT1T50183.html

the area  for a possible Araiso-beya - Akihabara - Asakusabashi - Ryogoku stations

20190117-OHT1I50031-L.jpg

 

Edited by Akinomaki
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 5
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now